Enfilade

Display | William Hogarth, 1697–1764

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on November 26, 2014

Now on view at Tate Britain:

William Hogarth, 1697–1764
Tate Britain, London, 27 October 2014 — 26 April 2015
Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, Summer 2015

William Hogarth, The Painter and his Pug, 1745 (London: Tate, purchased 1824).

William Hogarth, The Painter and his Pug, 1745 (London: Tate, purchased 1824).

This display marks the 250th anniversary of the death of Hogarth. It includes almost all of his paintings in the Tate Collection, as well as prints, drawings and rarely seen items from the Tate Library and Archive.

The story of art in this country often begins with William Hogarth, who died in late October 1764. Satirist, printmaker, portraitist, history painter and art theorist, in the two hundred and fifty years since his death Hogarth has regularly been positioned as the founding father of British art. This persistent notion was reflected in the early years of Tate’s displays: for decades his was the earliest British work on show at Tate.

Hogarth first gained recognition painting scenes from the theatre. He went on to make his name with his darkly humorous ‘modern moral’ series depicting the declining fortunes of foolish or ignoble characters, and brought similar vivacity to the polite interiors of his ‘conversation piece’ portraits. In 1735 he founded an academy for artists and later wrote a treatise on the aesthetic theories he developed over the course of his career. Whether painting, printmaking or writing, he was concerned with forging and defending a distinctly British art.

In 1951 Tate mounted the first major exhibition of Hogarth’s work since 1814. Tate gained independence from the National Gallery in 1955 and started acquiring works in its own right, and further exhibitions and displays followed reflecting research into Hogarth’s life and art. From the early 1950s Tate also acquired work by earlier British artists, allowing Hogarth to be seen in the context of his predecessors: an innovative champion of British art, but by no means the first British artist.

Read more about Hogarth at the Tate

The online materials are useful, particularly Tim Batchelor’s account of the “Exhibitions and Displays” of Hogarth’s work at Tate (11 November 2014). CH

Exhibition | Hogarth, Reynolds, Turner: The Dawn of Modernity

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on March 20, 2014

From the museum:

Hogarth, Reynolds, Turner: Pittura inglese verso la modernità
The Dawn of Modernity: Painting in Britain in the 18th Century
Fondazione Roma Museo, Palazzo Sciarra, Rome, 15 April — 20 June 2014

Curated by Carolina Brook and Valter Curzi

pittura-inglese-romaThe exhibition offers the public a comprehensive overview of the social and artistic development that took place during the XVIII century in step with the hegemony gained by Great Britain at the historical, political, and economic level. For this purpose a corpus of over one hundred works belonging to prestigious institutions such as the British Museum, the Tate Gallery, the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Royal Academy, the National Portrait Gallery, the Museum of London, and the Uffizi Gallery has been formed and is accompanied by a nucleus of works from the important American collection belonging to the Yale Center for British Art.

During the eighteenth century England became an authentic international power, leader of the Industrial Revolution and of the domination of the sea routes, and thus raised the issue of establishing its own artistic school for the first time. The economic development lead by Great Britain created a new middle-class which included professionals, industrialists, merchants, scientists and philosophers who, having found that visible arts considerably affirmed their new social status, became patrons of those masters who over the century contributed to the definition of a domestic school.

The exhibition is divided into seven sections featuring a selection of works by the most significant English painters, for the purpose of documenting the portrait and landscape genres that found more fortune during this century, creating a figurative language capable of interpreting modernity which, in the nineteenth century, became a reference throughout Europe. Visitors may admire artists such as Hogarth, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Wright of Derby, Stubbs, Füssli, Constable, and Turner. Their works offer a significant cross-section of the peculiarity and originality of English art, an exhibition of which has not been held in Rome since 1966.

Update (added 19 April 2014) The exhibition press release, which details the seven sections, is available as a PDF file here».

The catalogue is available from Skira:

Carolina Brook and Valter Curzi, Hogarth, Reynolds, Turner: Pittura inglese verso la modernità (Rome: Skira, 2014), 304 pages, ISBN: 8857222707, €40.

Exhibition: ‘Sin and the City’, Hogarth at Princeton

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on August 31, 2011

From the exhibition website:

Sin and the City: William Hogarth’s London
Firestone Library, Princeton University, 26 August 2011 — 29 January 2012

William Hogarth, "Beer Street," 1751, etching and engraving (Princeton University: Graphic Arts Collection, Firestone Library)

This fall the Princeton University Library will celebrate eighteenth-century London as seen through engravings by one of its most popular storytellers. Sin and the City: William Hogarth’s London, on view 26 August 2011 to 29 January 2012, presents Hogarth’s unflinching chronicle of the city’s development from a medieval town to a swirling modern metropolis.

Whether examining scenes along the impoverished roads of St. Giles parish, peering into the dark cellars of Blood Bowl Alley, or accompanying a procession to the Tyburn gallows, Hogarth’s engravings plunge us into a city that is not only grand and powerful but also chaotic, crime-ridden, and sometimes even heartbreaking.

The exhibition includes 70 engravings by Hogarth, along with the work of his contemporaries, such as Jonathan Swift, John Gay, and Henry Fielding, among others. Period maps and original documents from the first production of The Beggar’s Opera will also be on view.

A full exhibition checklist is available here»

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Afternoon Roundtable Discussion: A Midnight Modern Conversation
Princeton University, 7 October 2011

With
Linda Colley, Shelby M.C. Davis 1958 Professor of History, Princeton University;
Mark Hallett, Professor of History of Art, University of York;
Tim Hitchcock, Professor of Eighteenth-Century History, University of Hertfordshire; and
Claude Rawson, Maynard Mack Professor of English, Yale University.
James Steward, Director of the Princeton University Art Museum will moderate.

A reception will follow.

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Additional information is available at the Events page. The exhibition organizers have also created a useful map detailing key locations for Hogarth’s prints.

Forthcoming: ‘Hogarth’s Hidden Parts’

Posted in books by Editor on November 21, 2010

Out this month, as noted at the publisher’s website:

Bernd W. Krysmanski, Hogarth’s Hidden Parts: Satiric Allusion, Erotic Wit, Blasphemous Bawdiness and Dark Humour in Eighteenth-Century English Art (Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms Verlag, 2010), ISBN: 9783487144719, EUR 48.

If you think of William Hogarth as a moralist who gave charitable support to foundlings and provided ethical guidance through his pictorial satires, then it is high time you changed your mind. This challenging, thoroughly researched and thought-provoking book reveals many new findings on Hogarth, showing us a different, hidden and immoral English artist: a carouser, a debauchee, and a spiteful joker who mercilessly attacked his contemporaries. Although a pictorial satirist and a successful print-dealer, Hogarth nevertheless wallowed in obscene amusement, frequented prostitutes, possibly had paedophilic tendencies, and seemingly died from the lingering effects of syphilis. Hogarth the popular painter and engraver is shown here as a dark humorist who dealt primarily in sexual double entendre and produced blasphemous motifs that satirically lambasted “high” religious art and debunked the eighteenth-century taste for Old Master work. This book ought to change the way we think about Hogarth.

Review: ‘William Hogarth’s Surprising Cosmopolitanism’

Posted in books, reviews by Editor on March 14, 2010

Recently posted at H-Albion:

Robin Simon, Hogarth, France and British Art (London: Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal, 2007), 313 pages, ISBN 978-0-9554063-0-0, $90.

Reviewed by Douglas Fordham, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Virginia; published on H-Albion, January 2010.

Since his death in 1764, William Hogarth has become a protean figurehead for a great many impulses in British culture. John Trusler’s “Hogarth Moralized” (1768) was an early and overt instance of the ends to which Hogarth’s life and oeuvre could be put, and Hogarth continues to be, if not moralized, then at least channeled into a disparate series of voices and roles. While the “New Art History” of the past two decades has turned its pragmatic sights on Hogarth the calculating businessman, it has also tended to reduce the artist to a somewhat bland spokesman for a polite and commercial age.[1] In the writings of David Solkin and David Bindman, in particular, Hogarth has been cast as a cultural latitudinarian, mainstream in his preoccupations and eager to please. To the extent that Hogarth’s works reveal contradictions, unpleasant truths, or impolite expressions they tend to be viewed as apt reflections of an anxious age. This view of the artist offered a calculated response to Ronald Paulson’s towering contribution to Hogarth scholarship, beginning in the 1970s, which emphasized the artist’s antinomian impulses and his empathetic eye for the sub-cultural. If Hogarth merges seamlessly into hegemonic discourses in the former, he activates a dizzying array of allusions and a daunting density of meaning in the voluminous writings of Paulson.[2] While each of these accounts, and a great many others, have transformed our understanding of the artist and his age, readers are ultimately tasked with choosing which Hogarth they prefer. For it hardly seems possible for one individual to embody so many contrary impulses.

Robin Simon makes a welcome contribution to this debate in “Hogarth, France and British Art,” where he offers a surprisingly fresh iteration of the artist and his milieu. Simon’s Hogarth is cosmopolitan in his understanding of European Old Masters and contemporary French art, sophisticated in his handling of oil paints, and a friend to “Tory wits” and Whig politicians alike. Hogarth emerges in Simon’s account as an intellectually serious artist and a deeply gifted painter who almost single-handedly elevated British art to a Continental level of refinement. In his desire to translate French theories and standards into a uniquely English vernacular, “Hogarth demands to be ranked with the literary giants of the ‘Augustan’ age in England” (p. 8). Simon shares with Paulson a propensity for making analogies between English literature and art, and some of Simon’s most compelling observations entail comparisons between Hogarth’s paintings and the English stage. . . .

The paradox latent in Simon’s approach is that Hogarth already had an English visual vernacular at his disposal in London printshops, on painted street signs, and in countless urban spectacles. While Simon deliberately challenges the “determinedly insular” (p. 3) quality of recent Hogarth scholarship, at what cost does Hogarth the cosmopolitan painter become divested from Hogarth the graphic satirist as Diana Donald and Mark Hallett, for example, have presented him?[3] This is a question of synthesis, however, rather than a legitimate critique of Simon’s stated aims. On its own terms, Simon’s book deserves to be read by everyone with an interest in British culture in the first half of the eighteenth century, and it dramatically improves our understanding of Anglo-French relations. It also manages to present us with yet another incarnation of the artist from which to choose. This is a significant accomplishment in itself, and if this new Hogarth sits uncomfortably alongside his forebearers, then it can only encourage us to look anew at Hogarth’s astonishingly diverse and provocative career.

For the full review, click here»

Notes (more…)

ASECS 2019, Denver

Posted in by Editor on March 14, 2019

Frederic C. Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum (Photo: Wikimedia Commons, August 2010). The Hamilton building, by Daniel Libeskind, opened in October 2006. Works from the Berger Collection Educational Trust have been on long-term loan at DAM since 1996; in February of this year 65 works of British art from the trust—including paintings by Thomas Gainsborough, Angelica Kauffman, George Stubbs, and Benjamin West—were donated to the museum. A selection will be on view beginning 2 March 2019 in Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection, organized by Kathleen Stuart, curator of the Berger Collection at the DAM.

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2019 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Grand Hyatt, Denver, 21–23 March 2019

The 50th annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies takes place at the Grand Hyatt in Denver. HECAA will be represented by the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Susanne Anderson-Riedel and scheduled for Saturday morning. Our annual business meeting will take place Friday evening at 6:00. A selection of 31 additional panels is included below (of the 198 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full slate of offerings, see the program.

H E C A A E V E N T S

HECCA Business Meeting
Friday, 6:00–7:00, Mt Evans

Anne Schroder New Scholars Session (HECAA)
Saturday, 8:00–9:30, Mt Harvard
Chair: Susanne ANDERSON-RIEDEL, University of New Mexico
1. Danielle EZOR, Southern Methodist University, “‘Of Exquisite Whiteness’: Porcelain and Constructing Race”
2. Lauren Kellogg DISALVO, Dixie State University, “‘Fancy Portraits’ and Women in Antique Guise”
3. Joshua HAINY, Truman State University, “John Flaxman’s Shield of Achilles: The Visualization of an Ancient Greek Text”
4. Katherine ISELIN, University of Missouri, “A Collection of the ‘Spintrian’ Medals of Tiberius and the Role of Ancient Erotic Art in Eighteenth-Century Collecting Culture”

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O T H E R S E S S I O N S R E L A T E D T O T H E V I S U A L A R T S

T H U R S D A Y , 2 1 M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Roundtable: From Dissertation to Book (Cultural Studies Caucus)
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Sopris B
Chair: Rajani SUDAN, Southern Methodist University
1. Melissa SCHOENBERGER, College of the Holy Cross, “The Author and the Applicant”
2. Bridget ORR, Vanderbilt, “Thinking Bigger: Being Read by Publishers and the Profession beyond Your Professors”
3. James MULHOLLAND, North Carolina State University, “What I’ve Learned about Writing a Book: Lessons about Time Management, Revision Plans, and Interacting with Publishers”
4. Angie HOGAN, University of Virginia Press, “What to Expect from a University Press Publisher”
5. Robert MARKLEY, University of Illinois, “From Dissertation to Book . . . to Book, to Book”

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Producers, Creators, Designers: Women Artists
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Evans
Chairs: Franny BROCK, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Lindsay DUNN, Texas Christian University
1. Kelsey BROSNAN, New Orleans Museum of Art, “Flowers, Fluids, and Femininity: The Olfactory Texture of Anne Vallayer-Coster’s Flower Paintings”
2. Katie SAGAL, Cornell College, “Vegetal Reality and Artistic Originality: Henrietta Maria Moriarty’s Botanical Illustrations”
3. Kelsey MARTIN, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Prints, Politics, and Publics: Women Printmakers during the 1789 French Revolution”
4. Molly MAROTTA, Florida State University, “‘That union of parts’: Museum Building as Nation Building in Barbara Hofland’s Ekphrastic Descriptions in the 1835 Description of the House and Museum of the North Side of Lincoln’s Inn Fields, The Residence of Sir John Soane”

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Making Stars: Biography and Celebrity
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Wilson
Chairs: Nora NACHUMI, Yeshiva University and Kristina STRAUB, Carnegie Mellon University
1. Elaine MCGIRR, University of Bristol, “Shooting Star: Theophilus Cibber’s Disastrous Self-Fashioning”
2. Jane WESSEL, Austin Peay State University, “Charles Mathews and Transmedia Biography”
3. Stuart SHERMAN, Fordham University, “Actress-Autobiographers in Print and Time: Catherine Clive, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Charke, and the Mid-Century Pivot from Playhouse towards Periodicity”
4. Heather McPHERSON, University of Alabama, Birmingham, “Image/Counter-Image: Contesting Celebrity in Graphic Satire”

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Roundtable: Race, Gender, Empire, and the Archives (SHARP)
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Grays Peak A
Chair: Sean MOORE, University of New Hampshire
1. Beth Fowkes TOBIN, University of Georgia, “Drawings in the Archives”
2. Rachael Scarborough KING, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Race, Gender, and Religion in the Ballitore Collection”
3. Rebecca SCHNEIDER, University of Colorado, Boulder, “Jamaican Archives and the Study of Freedom, Dead and Alive”

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Reinventing Graduate Student Mentoring
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Kathryn TEMPLE, Georgetown University
1. Manushag POWELL, Purdue University
2. Jacob MYERS, University of Pennsylvania
3. Lisa MARUCA, Wayne State University
4. Mark VARESCHI, University of Wisconsin, Madison
5. Juliet SHIELDS, University of Washington
6. Mita CHOUDHURY, Purdue University Northwest

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Collecting Studies: Circulation and Disruption
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Evans
Chair: Bénédicte MIYAMOTO, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle
1. Sarah BAKKALI, Université Paris Nanterre, “The Portfolio as ‘Portable Museum’: Disrupting French Collecting Practices”
2. Cristina MARTINEZ, University of Ottawa, “The Removal of Poussin’s Sacraments from Italy: Smuggling, Displacing Cultural Property, and Developing Copyright”
3. Jeffrey SCHRADER, University of Colorado, Denver, “Sacred Images as a Foundation of Collecting Practices in the Spanish Monarchy”
4. Louisiane FERLIER, The Royal Society, “Classifying the Royal Society Collections in the Eighteenth Century (and Now)”

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Gesturing toward the Antique
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Torrey Peak
Chairs: Monica Anke HAHN, Community College of Philadelphia and Craig HANSON, Calvin College
1. Ersy CONTOGOURIS, Université de Montréal, “Emma Hamilton’s Attitudes: Appropriating the Antique”
2. Tracy EHRLICH, Parsons School of Design/The New School, “Gesture, Antiquity, Aesthetics: Rome before Winckelmann and Goethe”
3. Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University, “When in Rome: Antiquity and Ambition in Jean Ranc’s The Sons of the Duke of Berwick
4. Ashley HANNEBRINK, Harvard University, “Classicizing Gestures in and around French Eighteenth-Century Sculpture”

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Changing Faces: New Directions in Portraiture
Thursday, 11:30–1:00, Mt. Harvard
Chair: William CLARK, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY
1. Vivian P. CAMERON, Independent Scholar, “A Question of Identity: Vigée-Lebrun’s Madame Dugazon as Nina
2. Caroline CULP, Stanford University, “Painting Outside Time: Icons and Anachronism in Copley’s Revolutionary Boston”
3. Dorothy JOHNSON, University of Iowa, “Historical Faces/Historical Fictions? Art and Ontology in David’s Portraits”
4. Bradford MUDGE, University of Colorado, Denver, “Face Value: Portraits, Money, and Genre”

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Roundtable: Forms of Empire (Race and Empire Caucus)
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Grays Peak B
Chairs: Julie Chun KIM, Fordham University and Sunil AGNANI, University of Illinois, Chicago
1. Eugenia ZUROSKI, McMaster University, “What Happened in the Chinese Summer House?: Empire’s Ambivalent Details”
2. Chloe Wigston SMITH, University of York, “Empire, Handmade”
3. Douglas FORDHAM, University of Virginia, “Worldmaking in Aquatint”
4. Edward LARKIN, University of Delaware, “Visualizing the Chronotope of Empire”
5. Abby COYKENDALL, Eastern Michigan University, “The Empire of Form and the British Novel: Clara Reeve’s Destination
Respondent: Wendy Anne LEE, New York University

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Roundtable: Recovering Women’s Satiric Voices; or, A Feminist’s Work is Never Done, I
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Sharon SMITH, South Dakota State University
1. Jonathan SADOW, SUNY Oneonta, “Satirizing ‘Satire’ and Haywood’s Eovaai
2. Ersy CONTOGOURIS, Université de Montréal, “Hannah Humphrey, London’s Leading Caricature Printseller”
3. Susan CARLILE, California State University, Long Beach, “The Satiric Voices of Charlotte Lennox”
4. Shawn Lisa MAURER, College of the Holy Cross, “Recovering ‘Satirical’ Austen: The Work of the Juvenilia”
5. Jocelyn HARRIS, University of Otago, “Jane Austen, Satirist”

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Small Things in the Eighteenth Century, II
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Torrey Peak
Chair: Beth Fowkes TOBIN, University of Georgia
1. Marina KLIGER, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, “‘Small gifts kindle friendship’: Amateur Art and the Politics of Exchange in Post-Revolutionary France
2. Joanna GOHMANN, The Walters Art Museum, “A Small Box with a Big Punch: A Case Study in the Intellectual Complexity of Small Things”
3. Nathalie RIZZONI, Sorbonne Université, “French Eighteenth-Century Handscreens or Cardboard Treasures in American Public Collections”

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Interactions between Art and Insurance
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Mt. Wilson
Chair: Jennifer CHUONG, Harvard University
1. Avigail MOSS, University of Southern California, “A Gallery of Risk and Virtue: The Eighteenth-Century Image of Insurance”
2. Matthew HUNTER, McGill University, “From the Ship and Bladebone to The Slave Ship and Back Again: Turner and Insurance”
3. Sarah CARTER, McGill University, “Underwriting Art: Thomas Coutts and Fuseli’s Milton Gallery”

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Publishing in an Eighteenth-Century Journal
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Matthew WYMAN-MCCARTHY, Eighteenth-Century Studies
1. Eve Tavor BANNET, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture
2. Robert MARKLEY, Eighteenth-Century Theory and Interpretation
3. Cheryl NIXON, Eighteenth-Century Studies
4. Cedric REVERAND, Eighteenth-Century Life
5. Roxann WHEELER, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture

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Members Reception
Thursday, 6:00–7:30, Capitol Peak

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F R I D A Y , 2 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Print Room Pedagogies: Teaching in the Print Room
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Evans
Chair: Hope SASKA, University of Colorado, Boulder
1. Thora BRYLOWE, University of Colorado, Boulder, “Learning to Look: Teaching Literature in the Museum”
2. Rebecca MAY, Duquesne University, “‘The very subject before us…the flies that haunt the places of dissection’: Teaching Anatomical Knowledge Using Archival Illustrations”
3. Cynthia ROMAN, Yale University, “W. S. Lewis’s Print Room to the Lewis Walpole Library: Making Connections between Documentary Content and Materiality in the Study of Eighteenth-Century Prints”
4. Alden GORDON, Trinity College, “Print History Courses for Undergraduate Liberal Arts Students”

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The Landscape Garden in Eighteenth Century England and Beyond
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Elbert B
Chair: Janet WHITE, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
1. Elizabeth MJELDE, De Anza College, “William Gilpin at Stowe”
2. Dana Gliserman KOPANS, SUNY Empire State College, “…to the gulph in which I am now swallowed up’: Some Literary Uses of Landscape Architecture”
3. Felix MARTIN, Aachen University, “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin—An English Landscape Garden?”

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Bon Appétit: Dining in the Eighteenth Century
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Yale
Chair: Joanna GOHMANN, The Walters Art Museum
1. Sarah Sylvester WILLIAMS, Independent Scholar, “Nicolas Lancret and the Sociability of Dining”
2. Nicole MAHONEY, University of Maryland College Park, “The Politics of Dinner: French Sociability, Material Culture, and Cuisine in the Early American Republic”
3. Lauren FREESE, University of South Dakota, “‘Life is like a good bowl of punch’: The Communicative and Social Function of Food Imagery in Eighteenth-Century American Periodicals”
4. Thomas NEAL, University of Akron, “‘La mesa ilustrada’: Culinary Discourse in Eighteenth-Century Spain”

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Picturing the Stage I (Theatre and Performance Studies Caucus)
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Michael BURDEN, New College, Oxford University
1. Laurence MARIE, Columbia University, “Is Painting the New Model for Eighteenth-Century Acting?”
2. Deborah PAYNE, American University, “Theatrical Illustrations as Scholarly Evidence”
3. Laurel PETERSON, The Morgan Library and Museum, “Spectacular Stages: Set Design and Mural Painting in the Age of Vanbrugh”
4. Mark LEDBURY, University of Sydney, “Painter, Playwright, Entrepreneur: Prince Hoare and Innovation Transfer in 1790s London”

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Art, Literature, and Medicine in Eighteenth-Century Italy
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Yale
Chair: Francesca SAVOIA, University of Pittsburgh
1. Paolo PALMIERI, University of Pittsburgh, “Animal magnetism in Da Ponte’s libretto for Mozart’s Così fan tutte
2. Wendy Wassyng ROWORTH, University of Rhode Island, “Anatomists and Portraiture: Some Encounters on the Grand Tour in Italy”
3. Rebecca MESSBARGER, Washington University, St. Louis, “Visceral Sense: From Criminal Corpses to Donor Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Bologna”
4. Irene Zanini CORDI, Florida State University, “This Body of Mine in Pain: Women’s Poetic and Discursive Portrayals of the Medicated Female Body”

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50 Years of Women at ASECS
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Sopris B
Chair: Melissa SCHOENBERGER, College of the Holy Cross
1. Margaret Anne DOODY, University of Notre Dame
2. Felicity NUSSBAUM, University of California, Los Angeles
3. Heather McPHERSON, University of Alabama, Birmingham
4. Kristina STRAUB, Carnegie Mellon University
5. Susan S. LANSER, Brandeis University

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Roundtable: Job Market Crash Course (Graduate Student Caucus)
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Maroon Peak
Chair: Kristin DISTEL, Ohio University
1. Dennis MOORE, Florida State University, “How (and How Much) to Promote Your Accomplishments”
2. Ann CAMPBELL, Boise State University, “How to Adapt a Tenure-Track Dossier to Apply for Lectureships”
3. Jonathan KRAMNICK, Yale University, “Perspectives on the Changing Job Market”
4. Joseph BARTOLOMEO, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “Be ‘Yourself’: The Professional Persona”
5. Aleksondra HULTQUIST, Stockton University, “Adjunct to Tenure Track?”

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The Colors of Race
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Mt. Elbert B
Chairs: Oliver WUNSCH, Harvard Art Museums and Jennifer CHUONG, Harvard University
1. Rebecca CHUNG, The Legacy Press, “‘Not quite black’: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s Representations of Racialized Skin, in Text and Portraiture”
2. Sarah COHEN, SUNY Albany, “Fabricating Race through Metalwork in French Sugar Casters”
3. Elizabeth ATHENS, University of Connecticut, “That ‘Variety of Complexions’: Racial Variance in William Hogarth’s The Analysis of Beauty
4. Olivia CARPENTER, Harvard University, “‘Rendered Remarkable’: Race, Color, and Character in The Woman of Colour

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ASECS Business Meeting, Presentation of Awards, and Presidential Address
Friday, 2:30–4:15, Colorado Ballroom
ASECS Business Meeting All ASECS Members are encouraged to attend.
Presiding: Lisa BERGLUND, Executive Director
ASECS Presidential Address
Presiding: Christopher MS JOHNS, Norman and Roselea Goldberg Professor of History of Art Vanderbilt University
Melissa HYDE University of Florida, “Ambitions, Modest and Otherwise: Women and the Visual Arts in France”

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Repurposing
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Mt. Oxford
Chairs: Lauren Kellogg DISALVO, Dixie State University and Sarah Sylvester WILLIAMS, Independent Scholar
1. Matthew GIN, Harvard University, “Made Anew: Repurposed Materials and the Production of Ephemeral Festival Architecture in Eighteenth-Century Paris”
2. Shaena WEITZ, Independent Scholar, “The Afterlife of ‘Nina’: Creative Reuse of Music in Post-Revolutionary France”
3. Bethany WONG, Whittier College, “Sarah Siddons in America”
4. Mary CRONE-ROMANOVSKI, Florida Gulf Coast University, “Seats of Power: Repurposing the Chair in Three Novels of the Long Eighteenth Century”

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Picturing the Stage, II (Theatre and Performance Studies Caucus)
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Austin Peay State University
1. Jennie MACDONALD, Independent Scholar, “‘The Most Artistic Thing’: Framing the Theatre in Miniature”
2. Mita CHOUDHURY, Purdue University Northwest, “Domesticity Re(de)fined: The Architecture of Theatrical Space at Home”
3. Vanessa ROGERS, Rhodes College, “Picturing Polly: Iconographical Approaches to The Beggar’s Opera

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Freakery: The Limits of the Body
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Mt. Wilson
Chair: Stan BOOTH, University of Winchester
1. Noelle GALLAGHER, University of Manchester, “Noseless in London: Nasal Disfigurement in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Art”
2. Scott SANDERS, Dartmouth College, “Freaky Sounds: Vocal Physiology as conceived through Marginalized Voices”
3. Tonya HOWE, Marymount University, “‘Sometimes we frame our Selves to be lame’: Bodies of Farce on the Eighteenth-Century Stage”

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Virtute Duce, comite Fortuna Music for Harpsichord and Flute by Elisabetta de Gambarini and Anna Bon, A Lecture-Recital
Friday, 7:30–9:00, Colorado Ballroom
Kimary FICK, Oregon State, Baroque Flute
Alison DeSIMONE, University of Missouri, Kansas City, Harpsichord

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S A T U R D A Y , 2 3 M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Pressing Questions for ASECS at 50: The Digital Humanities and the Global Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 9:45–11:15, Mt Evans
Chair: Christy PICHICHERO, George Mason University
1. Jeff RAVEL, MIT
2. Nicole ALJOE, Northeastern University
3. Paris SPIES-GANS, Harvard University
4. Rebecca GEOFFROY-SCHWINDEN, University of North Texas
5. Karen STOLLEY, Emory University
6. Michael YONAN, University of Missouri
7. Chi-Ming YANG, University of Pennsylvania
8. Kristel SMENTEK, MIT

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Art and Material Culture from the Ibero-American Realms
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Mt. Harvard
Chair: Jeffrey SCHRADER, University of Colorado, Denver
1. Rachel ZIMMERMAN, Colorado State University, Pueblo, “Sacred, Secular, Exotic, European: Imitation Lacquer Chinoiserie in Colonial Minas Gerais, Brazil”
2. Sabena KULL, University of Delaware, “Floral Garland Paintings in Eighteenth-Century Peru: Circumscribing the Sacred from Europe to the Colonial Andes”
3. James MIDDLETON, Independent Scholar, “Dress and Trade in a Mid-Eighteenth-Century New Spanish Topographical Painting”
4. Gustavo FIERROS, University of Denver, “Toward an Equinoctial Landscape during the Eighteenth Century”

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Between Art and Labor: Craft in the Global Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Mt. Elbert B
Chair: Cassidy PICKEN, Capilano University
1. Ruth MACK, SUNY Buffalo, “‘Useful, Again and Again’: Theory in Worker-Poet Craft”
2. Isabelle MASSE, McGill University, “The Transmission of Craftsmanship: Making Pastel Sticks in Eighteenth-Century Lausanne”
3. Katarina O’BRIAIN, St. Mary’s University, “Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Craft Labor”

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Living with the Ancients
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Mt. Princeton
Chair: Paul KELLEHER, Emory University
1. Helen DEUTSCH, University of California, Los Angeles, “‘TO VIRTUE ONLY and HER FRIENDS, A FRIEND’: Pope, Wimsatt, and the Erotics of Criticism”
2. Chris ROULSTON, University of Western Ontario, “Sexuality in Translation: Anne Lister and the Ancients”
3. Caroline GONDA, University of Cambridge, “Identity and the Classics in Anne Damer’s Notebooks”

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Going Public: Taking Eighteenth-Century Material Culture into the Public Eye
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Torrey Peak
Chair: Jamie KINSLEY, Arizona State University
1. Susannah OTTAWAY, Carleton College, “‘The Biggest Object in Our Collection’: Material Culture and Museum Collaboration in the History of Social Welfare”
2. Susan EGENOLF, Texas A&M University, “Gods in the Western Midlands: Bringing Josiah Wedgwood to 21st-Century Texas”
3. Maureen HARKIN, Reed College, “Tapestry and Topiary: Adam Smith’s Defense of Craft”
4. Caitlan TRUELOVE, University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, “Ambiguity and Intertextuality in the Music of Outlander (2014–Present)”
Respondent: Jessica RICHARD, Wake Forest University

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Women and Whiteness
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Katharine JENSEN, Louisiana State University
1. Emily Clare CASEY, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, “White Revivals: Women in the Guise of Shakespeare’s Miranda in Eighteenth-Century Portraiture”
2. Christopher DOUGLAS, University of Alabama, “More than ‘half an Englishwoman’: Performing Race, Nationality, and Belonging in The Woman of Colour
3. Katherine ARPEN, Guilford College, “Elevating the White Heroine in Paul et Virginie
4. Oliver WUNSCH, Harvard Art Museums, “Carriera’s Whiteness”

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Quinquagenary Reception and Cash Bar
Saturday, 5:30–6:30, Capitol Peak

Comments Off on ASECS 2019, Denver

ASECS 2019, Denver

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on February 28, 2019

Frederic C. Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum (Photo: Wikimedia Commons, August 2010). The Hamilton building, by Daniel Libeskind, opened in October 2006. Works from the Berger Collection Educational Trust have been on long-term loan at DAM since 1996; in February of this year 65 works of British art from the trust—including paintings by Thomas Gainsborough, Angelica Kauffman, George Stubbs, and Benjamin West—were donated to the museum. A selection will be on view beginning 2 March 2019 in Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection, organized by Kathleen Stuart, curator of the Berger Collection at the DAM.

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2019 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Grand Hyatt, Denver, 21–23 March 2019

The 50th annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies takes place at the Grand Hyatt in Denver. HECAA will be represented by the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Susanne Anderson-Riedel and scheduled for Saturday morning. Our annual business meeting will take place Friday evening at 6:00. A selection of 31 additional panels is included below (of the 198 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full slate of offerings, see the program.

H E C A A  E V E N T S

HECCA Business Meeting
Friday, 6:00–7:00, Mt Evans

Anne Schroder New Scholars Session (HECAA)
Saturday, 8:00–9:30, Mt Harvard
Chair: Susanne ANDERSON-RIEDEL, University of New Mexico
1. Danielle EZOR, Southern Methodist University, “‘Of Exquisite Whiteness’: Porcelain and Constructing Race”
2. Lauren Kellogg DISALVO, Dixie State University, “‘Fancy Portraits’ and Women in Antique Guise”
3. Joshua HAINY, Truman State University, “John Flaxman’s Shield of Achilles: The Visualization of an Ancient Greek Text”
4. Katherine ISELIN, University of Missouri, “A Collection of the ‘Spintrian’ Medals of Tiberius and the Role of Ancient Erotic Art in Eighteenth-Century Collecting Culture”

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O T H E R  S E S S I O N S  R E L A T E D  T O  T H E  V I S U A L  A R T S

T H U R S D A Y ,  2 1  M A R C H  2 0 1 9

Roundtable: From Dissertation to Book (Cultural Studies Caucus)
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Sopris B
Chair: Rajani SUDAN, Southern Methodist University
1. Melissa SCHOENBERGER, College of the Holy Cross, “The Author and the Applicant”
2. Bridget ORR, Vanderbilt, “Thinking Bigger: Being Read by Publishers and the Profession beyond Your Professors”
3. James MULHOLLAND, North Carolina State University, “What I’ve Learned about Writing a Book: Lessons about Time Management, Revision Plans, and Interacting with Publishers”
4. Angie HOGAN, University of Virginia Press, “What to Expect from a University Press Publisher”
5. Robert MARKLEY, University of Illinois, “From Dissertation to Book . . . to Book, to Book”

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Producers, Creators, Designers: Women Artists
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Evans
Chairs: Franny BROCK, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Lindsay DUNN, Texas Christian University
1. Kelsey BROSNAN, New Orleans Museum of Art, “Flowers, Fluids, and Femininity: The Olfactory Texture of Anne Vallayer-Coster’s Flower Paintings”
2. Katie SAGAL, Cornell College, “Vegetal Reality and Artistic Originality: Henrietta Maria Moriarty’s Botanical Illustrations”
3. Kelsey MARTIN, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Prints, Politics, and Publics: Women Printmakers during the 1789 French Revolution”
4. Molly MAROTTA, Florida State University, “‘That union of parts’: Museum Building as Nation Building in Barbara Hofland’s Ekphrastic Descriptions in the 1835 Description of the House and Museum of the North Side of Lincoln’s Inn Fields, The Residence of Sir John Soane”

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Making Stars: Biography and Celebrity
Thursday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Wilson
Chairs: Nora NACHUMI, Yeshiva University and Kristina STRAUB, Carnegie Mellon University
1. Elaine MCGIRR, University of Bristol, “Shooting Star: Theophilus Cibber’s Disastrous Self-Fashioning”
2. Jane WESSEL, Austin Peay State University, “Charles Mathews and Transmedia Biography”
3. Stuart SHERMAN, Fordham University, “Actress-Autobiographers in Print and Time: Catherine Clive, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Charke, and the Mid-Century Pivot from Playhouse towards Periodicity”
4. Heather McPHERSON, University of Alabama, Birmingham, “Image/Counter-Image: Contesting Celebrity in Graphic Satire”

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Roundtable: Race, Gender, Empire, and the Archives (SHARP)
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Grays Peak A
Chair: Sean MOORE, University of New Hampshire
1. Beth Fowkes TOBIN, University of Georgia, “Drawings in the Archives”
2. Rachael Scarborough KING, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Race, Gender, and Religion in the Ballitore Collection”
3. Rebecca SCHNEIDER, University of Colorado, Boulder, “Jamaican Archives and the Study of Freedom, Dead and Alive”

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Reinventing Graduate Student Mentoring
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Kathryn TEMPLE, Georgetown University
1. Manushag POWELL, Purdue University
2. Jacob MYERS, University of Pennsylvania
3. Lisa MARUCA, Wayne State University
4. Mark VARESCHI, University of Wisconsin, Madison
5. Juliet SHIELDS, University of Washington
6. Mita CHOUDHURY, Purdue University Northwest

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Collecting Studies: Circulation and Disruption
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Evans
Chair: Bénédicte MIYAMOTO, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle
1. Sarah BAKKALI, Université Paris Nanterre, “The Portfolio as ‘Portable Museum’: Disrupting French Collecting Practices”
2. Cristina MARTINEZ, University of Ottawa, “The Removal of Poussin’s Sacraments from Italy: Smuggling, Displacing Cultural Property, and Developing Copyright”
3. Jeffrey SCHRADER, University of Colorado, Denver, “Sacred Images as a Foundation of Collecting Practices in the Spanish Monarchy”
4. Louisiane FERLIER, The Royal Society, “Classifying the Royal Society Collections in the Eighteenth Century (and Now)”

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Gesturing toward the Antique
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Torrey Peak
Chairs: Monica Anke HAHN, Community College of Philadelphia and Craig HANSON, Calvin College
1. Ersy CONTOGOURIS, Université de Montréal, “Emma Hamilton’s Attitudes: Appropriating the Antique”
2. Tracy EHRLICH, Parsons School of Design/The New School, “Gesture, Antiquity, Aesthetics: Rome before Winckelmann and Goethe”
3. Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University, “When in Rome: Antiquity and Ambition in Jean Ranc’s The Sons of the Duke of Berwick
4. Ashley HANNEBRINK, Harvard University, “Classicizing Gestures in and around French Eighteenth-Century Sculpture”

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Changing Faces: New Directions in Portraiture
Thursday, 11:30–1:00, Mt. Harvard
Chair: William CLARK, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY
1. Vivian P. CAMERON, Independent Scholar, “A Question of Identity: Vigée-Lebrun’s Madame Dugazon as Nina
2. Caroline CULP, Stanford University, “Painting Outside Time: Icons and Anachronism in Copley’s Revolutionary Boston”
3. Dorothy JOHNSON, University of Iowa, “Historical Faces/Historical Fictions? Art and Ontology in David’s Portraits”
4. Bradford MUDGE, University of Colorado, Denver, “Face Value: Portraits, Money, and Genre”

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Roundtable: Forms of Empire (Race and Empire Caucus)
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Grays Peak B
Chairs: Julie Chun KIM, Fordham University and Sunil AGNANI, University of Illinois, Chicago
1. Eugenia ZUROSKI, McMaster University, “What Happened in the Chinese Summer House?: Empire’s Ambivalent Details”
2. Chloe Wigston SMITH, University of York, “Empire, Handmade”
3. Douglas FORDHAM, University of Virginia, “Worldmaking in Aquatint”
4. Edward LARKIN, University of Delaware, “Visualizing the Chronotope of Empire”
5. Abby COYKENDALL, Eastern Michigan University, “The Empire of Form and the British Novel: Clara Reeve’s Destination
Respondent: Wendy Anne LEE, New York University

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Roundtable: Recovering Women’s Satiric Voices; or, A Feminist’s Work is Never Done, I
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Sharon SMITH, South Dakota State University
1. Jonathan SADOW, SUNY Oneonta, “Satirizing ‘Satire’ and Haywood’s Eovaai
2. Ersy CONTOGOURIS, Université de Montréal, “Hannah Humphrey, London’s Leading Caricature Printseller”
3. Susan CARLILE, California State University, Long Beach, “The Satiric Voices of Charlotte Lennox”
4. Shawn Lisa MAURER, College of the Holy Cross, “Recovering ‘Satirical’ Austen: The Work of the Juvenilia”
5. Jocelyn HARRIS, University of Otago, “Jane Austen, Satirist”

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Small Things in the Eighteenth Century, II
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Torrey Peak
Chair: Beth Fowkes TOBIN, University of Georgia
1. Marina KLIGER, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, “‘Small gifts kindle friendship’: Amateur Art and the Politics of Exchange in Post-Revolutionary France
2. Joanna GOHMANN, The Walters Art Museum, “A Small Box with a Big Punch: A Case Study in the Intellectual Complexity of Small Things”
3. Nathalie RIZZONI, Sorbonne Université, “French Eighteenth-Century Handscreens or Cardboard Treasures in American Public Collections”

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Interactions between Art and Insurance
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Mt. Wilson
Chair: Jennifer CHUONG, Harvard University
1. Avigail MOSS, University of Southern California, “A Gallery of Risk and Virtue: The Eighteenth-Century Image of Insurance”
2. Matthew HUNTER, McGill University, “From the Ship and Bladebone to The Slave Ship and Back Again: Turner and Insurance”
3. Sarah CARTER, McGill University, “Underwriting Art: Thomas Coutts and Fuseli’s Milton Gallery”

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Publishing in an Eighteenth-Century Journal
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Matthew WYMAN-MCCARTHY, Eighteenth-Century Studies
1. Eve Tavor BANNET, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture
2. Robert MARKLEY, Eighteenth-Century Theory and Interpretation
3. Cheryl NIXON, Eighteenth-Century Studies
4. Cedric REVERAND, Eighteenth-Century Life
5. Roxann WHEELER, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture

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Members Reception
Thursday, 6:00–7:30, Capitol Peak

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F R I D A Y ,  2 2  M A R C H  2 0 1 9

Print Room Pedagogies: Teaching in the Print Room
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Evans
Chair: Hope SASKA, University of Colorado, Boulder
1. Thora BRYLOWE, University of Colorado, Boulder, “Learning to Look: Teaching Literature in the Museum”
2. Rebecca MAY, Duquesne University, “‘The very subject before us…the flies that haunt the places of dissection’: Teaching Anatomical Knowledge Using Archival Illustrations”
3. Cynthia ROMAN, Yale University, “W. S. Lewis’s Print Room to the Lewis Walpole Library: Making Connections between Documentary Content and Materiality in the Study of Eighteenth-Century Prints”
4. Alden GORDON, Trinity College, “Print History Courses for Undergraduate Liberal Arts Students”

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The Landscape Garden in Eighteenth Century England and Beyond
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Elbert B
Chair: Janet WHITE, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
1. Elizabeth MJELDE, De Anza College, “William Gilpin at Stowe”
2. Dana Gliserman KOPANS, SUNY Empire State College, “…to the gulph in which I am now swallowed up’: Some Literary Uses of Landscape Architecture”
3. Felix MARTIN, Aachen University, “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin—An English Landscape Garden?”

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Bon Appétit: Dining in the Eighteenth Century
Friday, 8:00–9:30, Mt. Yale
Chair: Joanna GOHMANN, The Walters Art Museum
1. Sarah Sylvester WILLIAMS, Independent Scholar, “Nicolas Lancret and the Sociability of Dining”
2. Nicole MAHONEY, University of Maryland College Park, “The Politics of Dinner: French Sociability, Material Culture, and Cuisine in the Early American Republic”
3. Lauren FREESE, University of South Dakota, “‘Life is like a good bowl of punch’: The Communicative and Social Function of Food Imagery in Eighteenth-Century American Periodicals”
4. Thomas NEAL, University of Akron, “‘La mesa ilustrada’: Culinary Discourse in Eighteenth-Century Spain”

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Picturing the Stage I (Theatre and Performance Studies Caucus)
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Michael BURDEN, New College, Oxford University
1. Laurence MARIE, Columbia University, “Is Painting the New Model for Eighteenth-Century Acting?”
2. Deborah PAYNE, American University, “Theatrical Illustrations as Scholarly Evidence”
3. Laurel PETERSON, The Morgan Library and Museum, “Spectacular Stages: Set Design and Mural Painting in the Age of Vanbrugh”
4. Mark LEDBURY, University of Sydney, “Painter, Playwright, Entrepreneur: Prince Hoare and Innovation Transfer in 1790s London”

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Art, Literature, and Medicine in Eighteenth-Century Italy
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Yale
Chair: Francesca SAVOIA, University of Pittsburgh
1. Paolo PALMIERI, University of Pittsburgh, “Animal magnetism in Da Ponte’s libretto for Mozart’s Così fan tutte
2. Wendy Wassyng ROWORTH, University of Rhode Island, “Anatomists and Portraiture: Some Encounters on the Grand Tour in Italy”
3. Rebecca MESSBARGER, Washington University, St. Louis, “Visceral Sense: From Criminal Corpses to Donor Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Bologna”
4. Irene Zanini CORDI, Florida State University, “This Body of Mine in Pain: Women’s Poetic and Discursive Portrayals of the Medicated Female Body”

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50 Years of Women at ASECS
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Mt. Sopris B
Chair: Melissa SCHOENBERGER, College of the Holy Cross
1. Margaret Anne DOODY, University of Notre Dame
2. Felicity NUSSBAUM, University of California, Los Angeles
3. Heather McPHERSON, University of Alabama, Birmingham
4. Kristina STRAUB, Carnegie Mellon University
5. Susan S. LANSER, Brandeis University

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Roundtable: Job Market Crash Course (Graduate Student Caucus)
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Maroon Peak
Chair: Kristin DISTEL, Ohio University
1. Dennis MOORE, Florida State University, “How (and How Much) to Promote Your Accomplishments”
2. Ann CAMPBELL, Boise State University, “How to Adapt a Tenure-Track Dossier to Apply for Lectureships”
3. Jonathan KRAMNICK, Yale University, “Perspectives on the Changing Job Market”
4. Joseph BARTOLOMEO, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “Be ‘Yourself’: The Professional Persona”
5. Aleksondra HULTQUIST, Stockton University, “Adjunct to Tenure Track?”

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The Colors of Race
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Mt. Elbert B
Chairs: Oliver WUNSCH, Harvard Art Museums and Jennifer CHUONG, Harvard University
1. Rebecca CHUNG, The Legacy Press, “‘Not quite black’: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s Representations of Racialized Skin, in Text and Portraiture”
2. Sarah COHEN, SUNY Albany, “Fabricating Race through Metalwork in French Sugar Casters”
3. Elizabeth ATHENS, University of Connecticut, “That ‘Variety of Complexions’: Racial Variance in William Hogarth’s The Analysis of Beauty
4. Olivia CARPENTER, Harvard University, “‘Rendered Remarkable’: Race, Color, and Character in The Woman of Colour

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ASECS Business Meeting, Presentation of Awards, and Presidential Address
Friday, 2:30–4:15, Colorado Ballroom
ASECS Business Meeting All ASECS Members are encouraged to attend.
Presiding: Lisa BERGLUND, Executive Director
ASECS Presidential Address
Presiding: Christopher MS JOHNS, Norman and Roselea Goldberg Professor of History of Art Vanderbilt University
Melissa HYDE University of Florida, “Ambitions, Modest and Otherwise: Women and the Visual Arts in France”

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Repurposing
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Mt. Oxford
Chairs: Lauren Kellogg DISALVO, Dixie State University and Sarah Sylvester WILLIAMS, Independent Scholar
1. Matthew GIN, Harvard University, “Made Anew: Repurposed Materials and the Production of Ephemeral Festival Architecture in Eighteenth-Century Paris”
2. Shaena WEITZ, Independent Scholar, “The Afterlife of ‘Nina’: Creative Reuse of Music in Post-Revolutionary France”
3. Bethany WONG, Whittier College, “Sarah Siddons in America”
4. Mary CRONE-ROMANOVSKI, Florida Gulf Coast University, “Seats of Power: Repurposing the Chair in Three Novels of the Long Eighteenth Century”

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Picturing the Stage, II (Theatre and Performance Studies Caucus)
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Pike’s Peak
Chair: Austin Peay State University
1. Jennie MACDONALD, Independent Scholar, “‘The Most Artistic Thing’: Framing the Theatre in Miniature”
2. Mita CHOUDHURY, Purdue University Northwest, “Domesticity Re(de)fined: The Architecture of Theatrical Space at Home”
3. Vanessa ROGERS, Rhodes College, “Picturing Polly: Iconographical Approaches to The Beggar’s Opera

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Freakery: The Limits of the Body
Friday, 4:30–6:00, Mt. Wilson
Chair: Stan BOOTH, University of Winchester
1. Noelle GALLAGHER, University of Manchester, “Noseless in London: Nasal Disfigurement in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Art”
2. Scott SANDERS, Dartmouth College, “Freaky Sounds: Vocal Physiology as conceived through Marginalized Voices”
3. Tonya HOWE, Marymount University, “‘Sometimes we frame our Selves to be lame’: Bodies of Farce on the Eighteenth-Century Stage”

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Virtute Duce, comite Fortuna Music for Harpsichord and Flute by Elisabetta de Gambarini and Anna Bon, A Lecture-Recital
Friday, 7:30–9:00, Colorado Ballroom
Kimary FICK, Oregon State, Baroque Flute
Alison DeSIMONE, University of Missouri, Kansas City, Harpsichord

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S A T U R D A Y ,  2 3  M A R C H  2 0 1 9

Pressing Questions for ASECS at 50: The Digital Humanities and the Global Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 9:45–11:15, Mt Evans
Chair: Christy PICHICHERO, George Mason University
1. Jeff RAVEL, MIT
2. Nicole ALJOE, Northeastern University
3. Paris SPIES-GANS, Harvard University
4. Rebecca GEOFFROY-SCHWINDEN, University of North Texas
5. Karen STOLLEY, Emory University
6. Michael YONAN, University of Missouri
7. Chi-Ming YANG, University of Pennsylvania
8. Kristel SMENTEK, MIT

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Art and Material Culture from the Ibero-American Realms
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Mt. Harvard
Chair: Jeffrey SCHRADER, University of Colorado, Denver
1. Rachel ZIMMERMAN, Colorado State University, Pueblo, “Sacred, Secular, Exotic, European: Imitation Lacquer Chinoiserie in Colonial Minas Gerais, Brazil”
2. Sabena KULL, University of Delaware, “Floral Garland Paintings in Eighteenth-Century Peru: Circumscribing the Sacred from Europe to the Colonial Andes”
3. James MIDDLETON, Independent Scholar, “Dress and Trade in a Mid-Eighteenth-Century New Spanish Topographical Painting”
4. Gustavo FIERROS, University of Denver, “Toward an Equinoctial Landscape during the Eighteenth Century”

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Between Art and Labor: Craft in the Global Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Mt. Elbert B
Chair: Cassidy PICKEN, Capilano University
1. Ruth MACK, SUNY Buffalo, “‘Useful, Again and Again’: Theory in Worker-Poet Craft”
2. Isabelle MASSE, McGill University, “The Transmission of Craftsmanship: Making Pastel Sticks in Eighteenth-Century Lausanne”
3. Katarina O’BRIAIN, St. Mary’s University, “Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Craft Labor”

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Living with the Ancients
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Mt. Princeton
Chair: Paul KELLEHER, Emory University
1. Helen DEUTSCH, University of California, Los Angeles, “‘TO VIRTUE ONLY and HER FRIENDS, A FRIEND’: Pope, Wimsatt, and the Erotics of Criticism”
2. Chris ROULSTON, University of Western Ontario, “Sexuality in Translation: Anne Lister and the Ancients”
3. Caroline GONDA, University of Cambridge, “Identity and the Classics in Anne Damer’s Notebooks”

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Going Public: Taking Eighteenth-Century Material Culture into the Public Eye
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Torrey Peak
Chair: Jamie KINSLEY, Arizona State University
1. Susannah OTTAWAY, Carleton College, “‘The Biggest Object in Our Collection’: Material Culture and Museum Collaboration in the History of Social Welfare”
2. Susan EGENOLF, Texas A&M University, “Gods in the Western Midlands: Bringing Josiah Wedgwood to 21st-Century Texas”
3. Maureen HARKIN, Reed College, “Tapestry and Topiary: Adam Smith’s Defense of Craft”
4. Caitlan TRUELOVE, University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, “Ambiguity and Intertextuality in the Music of Outlander (2014–Present)”
Respondent: Jessica RICHARD, Wake Forest University

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Women and Whiteness
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Mt. Elbert A
Chair: Katharine JENSEN, Louisiana State University
1. Emily Clare CASEY, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, “White Revivals: Women in the Guise of Shakespeare’s Miranda in Eighteenth-Century Portraiture”
2. Christopher DOUGLAS, University of Alabama, “More than ‘half an Englishwoman’: Performing Race, Nationality, and Belonging in The Woman of Colour
3. Katherine ARPEN, Guilford College, “Elevating the White Heroine in Paul et Virginie
4. Oliver WUNSCH, Harvard Art Museums, “Carriera’s Whiteness”

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Quinquagenary Reception and Cash Bar
Saturday, 5:30–6:30, Capitol Peak

Exhibition | Ladies of Quality and Distinction

Posted in exhibitions, lectures (to attend) by Editor on September 22, 2018

Press release for the exhibition now on view at The Foundling:

Ladies of Quality and Distinction
The Foundling Museum, London, 21 September 2018 — 20 January 2019

Andrea Soldi, Portrait of Isabella Duchess of Manchester, 1738 (London: Whitfield Fine Art).

This autumn, for the first time, visitors to the Foundling Museum will have an opportunity to discover portraits and stories of the remarkable women who supported the establishment and running of London’s Foundling Hospital. Marking 100 years of female suffrage, Ladies of Quality and Distinction resets the focus of the Hospital’s story and radically re-hangs the Museum’s Picture Gallery.

Despite its male face, women permeate every aspect of the Hospital story—as mothers, supporters, wet nurses, staff, apprentice masters, artists, musicians, craftsmen, and foundlings. Yet for almost 300 years, history has placed these women as a footnote in the story. The Museum is redressing this balance by bringing these overlooked stories to the fore.

Following a successful campaign via Art Happens, the Art Fund’s crowdfunding platform, the Museum brings together portraits of the ‘ladies of quality and distinction’ who signed Thomas Coram’s original petition to King George II in 1735, calling for the establishment of a Foundling Hospital. Working closely with eighteenth-century specialist Elizabeth Einberg, the Museum has identified portraits of these duchesses in public and private collections across the UK. Hung together for the first time, these paintings will temporarily replace the portraits of male governors that line the walls of the Museum’s Picture Gallery, reuniting the Ladies on the site of the charity they helped establish, and highlighting their role in shaping British society today. Included are magnificent court portraits by leading eighteenth-century painters William Hogarth, Thomas Hudson, and Godfrey Kneller. The majority of the portraits are in private collections, having remained within the family or ancestral home. Some paintings have not been on public display for many years.

Downstairs in the Museum’s exhibition gallery, the lives of the women who supported the day-to-day running of the institution will be brought to life. Women worked in many different roles at the Hospital, from laundresses and scullery maids, to cooks and matrons. Beyond its walls the organisation was supported by a small army of wet nurses who fostered the children in their infancy, as well as inspectors who supervised them. It was not until the twentieth century that the first woman was appointed Governor. Nevertheless, many female supporters of similar social class to the Hospital Governors gave valued advice, particularly around the proper care of infants, girls, and female staff.

Highlighted stories include: Mrs Prudence West, a female inspector and the only woman to run a branch Hospital; Miss Eleanor Barnes, one of the earliest female Governors of the Hospital; Mrs Elizabeth Leicester, an early matron of the Foundling Hospital who oversaw some of its most challenging years; and Jane Pett, a dry nurse highly acclaimed for her exceptional care.

Caro Howell, Director of the Foundling Museum said: “Women of every social class permeate every aspect of the Foundling Hospital story. After centuries of omission, their revolutionary, catalytic and invaluable contributions can at last be celebrated. We are incredibly grateful to the 336 donors who supported our Art Happens campaign to make this important exhibition possible.”

This exhibition forms part of the Museum’s year-long programme of exhibitions, displays, and events to mark the centenary of female suffrage, by celebrating women’s contribution to British society, culture, and philanthropy from the 1720s to the present day. The Museum raised over £20,000 towards this exhibition through a successful Art Happens crowdfunding campaign. The Museum is incredibly grateful to all our exhibition donors, including the 336 donors who gave to our Art Happens campaign, our main corporate exhibition sponsor Saxton Bampfylde, and to Art Fund, whose support made conservation of paintings loaned for this exhibition possible.

P R O G R A M M I N G

Georgian Women
The Foundling Museum, London, 19 October 2018

Discover what it meant to be a woman during this period and how three writers have brought the era to life. Speakers include Imogen Hermes Gowar, author of the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlisted novel The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock; writer and television presenter Janet Ellis, author of The Butcher’s Hook; and Katharine Grant, whose novel Sedition was described by The Guardian as “subversive and unmissable.” Cash bar on the night. The programme begins at 19:00 (doors open at 18:30). Tickets £15 (£12.50 concessions and Foundling Friends). Details, including booking information, are available here.

Film Screening: The Duchess
The Foundling Museum, London, 9 November 2018

Join us for a unique cinema experience and enjoy the sensational 18th-century drama The Duchess, screened in the Picture Gallery. Keira Knightley and Ralph Fiennes star in this film exploring the life of Georgiana Spencer, Duchess of Devonshire, as she struggles to protect her children from her unscrupulous husband and social pressures, and find her independence. The film begins at 19:00. Tickets are £12. Details, including booking information, are available here.

Wikithon: Ladies Of Quality & Distinction
The Foundling Museum, London, 17 November 2018

Join our Wikipedia edit-a-thon and help us bring the overlooked stories of women and the Foundling Hospital to the fore. Bring your laptop and prepare with our Edit-a-thon guide. Led by researchers from the project Editing the Long Nineteenth Century: Recovering Women in the Digital Age in partnership with the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, the session begins at 13:00 and lasts until 16:00; it is free, but booking is essential. This event is part of the Being Human Festival, organized by the School of Advanced Study, University of London, in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.

Call for Papers | ASECS 2019, Denver

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on July 7, 2018

Frederic C. Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum (Photo: Wikimedia Commons, August 2010). The Hamilton building, by Daniel Libeskind, opened in October 2006. Works from the Berger Collection Educational Trust have been on long-term loan at DAM since 1996; in February of this year 65 works of British art from the trust—including paintings by Thomas Gainsborough, Angelica Kauffman, George Stubbs, and Benjamin West—were donated to the museum. A selection will be on view beginning 3 March 2019 in Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection, organized by Kathleen Stuart, curator of the Berger Collection at the DAM.

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From ASECS:

2019 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Denver, 21–23 March 2019

Proposals due by 15 September 2018

Proposals for papers at the at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, in Denver, are now being accepted. Proposals should be sent directly to the session chairs no later than 15 September 2018. Along with our annual luncheon and business meeting, HECAA will be represented with the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Christina Lindeman. A selection of additional sessions that might be relevant for HECAA members is included below. A full list of panels is available as a PDF file here.

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Anne Schroder New Scholars Session
Christina K. Lindeman (University of South Alabama), clindeman@southalabama.edu

This is an open session intended for advanced graduate students and early career scholars in the art and architectural history of the eighteenth century.

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Picturing the Stage (Theatre and Performance Studies Caucus)
Michael Burden (Oxford University), michael.burden@new.ox.ac.uk

What is the relationship between the moving action of live theatre and the static ‘pictures’ that both adorned the stage and visually represented it? How did eighteenth-century audiences (and how do modern scholars) ‘picture’ or imagine stage action? The stage, by definition, makes ‘pictures’. In an eighteenth-century theatre, the proscenium arch forms a picture frame through which the theatre-goer viewed the action, and onstage pictures, such as moveable scenery, added dimension to the play text. Offstage, meanwhile, theatrical pictures proliferated, especially images of performers, both in conventional portraits, in character, and as caricatures. Pictures were also used in support of the dramas themselves; one of the great publishing schemes of the eighteenth century, John Bell’s plays, was accompanied by a series of prints of performers ‘in character’. Capturing stage action on the page or canvas, however, was not an easy task and presents the artist with a series of challenges, and it presents us with versions of the same challenges in interpreting the results. We invite papers on any aspect of the topic and encourage participants to be creative in interpreting the title of the panel.

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Interfaces (Roundtable, Digital Humanities Caucus)
Mattie Burkert (Utah State University), mattie.burkert@usu.edu and Collin Jennings (Miami University Ohio), jenninc@miamioh.edu

Interfaces are thresholds that separate and mediate; they are surfaces through which users encounter tools, as well as protocols that allow different systems to interact. Interfaces are central to digital scholarly work, enabling the operations of databases, archives, and exhibitions that provide new forms of access to historical materials. Interface design often prioritizes ease of use, but recent critiques of search engines and social media platforms have shown how streamlined, user-friendly interfaces can obscure choices made about what is displayed and how. Humanities scholars have a role in these conversations, both in critiquing existing interfaces and in developing new approaches. How, we might ask, can we design interfaces that highlight principles like transparency and ambiguity without sacrificing usability? We invite proposals that explore interface models for digital projects, as well as ones that examine how eighteenth-century authors and illustrators engaged what we might anachronistically call interfaces. These could include experimental forms (Chambers’s “view of knowledge,” Priestley’s timeline) or reflections on the limits of such sites (Sterne’s blank page). How can we reconsider Enlightenment interfaces, and how do interfaces affect the way we produce knowledge in eighteenth-century studies? How might a focus on interface change the way we approach our materials?

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Forms of Empire (Roundtable, Race and Empire Caucus)
Sunil Agnani (University of Illinois-Chicago), jukim@fordham.edu

Some recent scholarship on literary and aesthetic form has been framed as a corrective to critical overemphasis on historical, political, and cultural contexts. This panel asks, however, whether paying attention to a particular historical subject—namely, empire—actually precludes the study of form. After all, eighteenth-century writers and artists depicting empire experimented with genres ranging from travel narrative to porcelain ware. The administration of empire also depended heavily on forms like illustrations and maps. This roundtable thus seeks brief papers on the relationship between aesthetics and empire. Papers on diverse forms and geographical locales are welcome. Also welcome are papers that address the problems involved in aestheticizing the types of exploitation that constituted eighteenth-century empire. What were the limits of such a project in the eighteenth century, and what are the limits of the project of considering both aesthetics and empire today? Note: this roundtable will be a companion session to the Race and Empire Caucus’s other roundtable on “Forms of Resistance.” To encourage dialogue across sessions, organizers will ask participants in one roundtable to serve as respondents for the other. Papers will be circulated in advance.

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Ireland, Scotland, and the Sublime Landscape (Irish Caucus)
Michael Griffin (University of Limerick), Michael.J.Griffin@ul.ie

In 1739 Susanna Drury’s painting The Giant’s Causeway offered a glimpse of a sublime aesthetic in landscape painting in Ireland. Dr. Johnson’s description of the subject of Drury’s painting as “worth seeing, but not worth going to see” suggests, in spite of its dismissive tone, a domesticated appreciation for the wild Irish landscape. There has been a significant recent interest in the influence of Scotland and Ireland in and on the evolution of a Romantic aesthetic. To this panel we invite papers which discuss the influence of Irish and Scottish culture, not just on the culture of the Romantic period traditionally defined (1789–1830) but going back to an earlier moment when ideas of sublimity were being applied in innovative ways: to the representation of landscape in Ireland and Scotland, but also to representations by Irish and Scottish writers and artists of sublime landscapes more generally. A core consideration will be the extent to which sublimity in landscape complimented or complicated national and/or regional enlightenments. Proposals can be interdisciplinary, and we would welcome considerations of painters alongside literature and aesthetics. Please send a 300-word abstract for a 20-minute paper, along with a 50-word biographical note.

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The Black Legend (Ibero-America Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies)
Catherine Jaffe (Texas State University), cj10@txstate.edu and Karen Stolley (Emory University), kstolle@emory.edu

The Black Legend, the negative opinion of Spaniards and the Spanish Empire as cruel and intolerant, first emerged in response to accounts of Spanish abuses during the sixteenth-century conquest period and lived on in the eighteenth century in the context of evolving imperial, religious and commercial rivalries. How was the Black Legend envisioned, represented, fictionalized, historicized, critiqued, perpetuated, deployed, debated, dramatized, or denounced, in the transatlantic world during the long eighteenth century, and/or in eighteenth-century studies? We invite 15-minute papers from all fields—literature, history, art history, music, political theory, etc.—that offer fresh perspectives on the Black Legend in the eighteenth century.

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Queer Female Networks (Roundtable, Aphra Behn Society)
Jade Higa (University of Hawaii), jadehiga@hawaii.edu

In her poem, “To my Excellent Lucasia, On Our Friendship,” Katherine Philips writes, “thou art all that I can prize, / My joy, my life, my rest.” Restoration era poems of love between women by writers such as Philips establish and emphasize the importance of female networks throughout the eighteenth century. From 1660 to 1830, women supported each other in politics, art, literature, the theater, and more. In these networking relationships, women also developed strong attachments to one another that many scholars have recognized as at least homosocial if not homoerotic. This roundtable will further the conversation surrounding these queer female networks of the long eighteenth-century. Questions might include but are not limited to: What did specific queer female networks accomplish? How do these female networks complicate the false homo/hetero binary? How are implications of queerness a necessary element of these female networks? Proposals on these questions, on specific female relationships, or on any other subject related to queer female networks are welcome.

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Community Colleges and the Eighteenth Century (Roundtable)
Chloe Northrop (Tarrant County College), chloe.northrop@tccd.edu

Due to the growth of community colleges in America, many graduate students and early career scholars are finding employment opportunities in these institutions. In the past, community colleges have been on the sidelines of the conventional academic hierarchy. While the focus of community colleges mainly surrounds teaching survey level courses, the purpose of this roundtable will be to examine how scholars of the eighteenth century remain connected to the academic world of their respective disciplines. Furthermore, this roundtable will also focus on methods of instruction that incorporates the eighteenth century into classrooms. These presentations will illuminate both the barriers and opportunities present in the community college setting. We welcome proposals from all disciplines connected with community colleges and from full time and adjunct professors.

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The Lives of the Plants
Katie Sagal (Cornell College), aksagal@gmail.com

With the recent rise in critical plant studies as a vector for understanding the relationship between humans and nature, it is worth reflecting in 2019 on how eighteenth-century thinkers understood the relationship between humanity and vegetality. Where the conventional narrative of man’s inevitable and triumphal dominion over nature has long since been disrupted by early eco-criticism (like Carolyn Merchant’s landmark book The Death of Nature), this panel hopes to continue to rethink the possible intersections between people and plants in the Enlightenment. This panel thus proposes to think both about and beyond traditional narratives of taxonomizers, explorers, and collectors to sort through the complex and complicated nodes between humans (always a part of nature) and plant life (always a part of the human experience). We might also think specifically about the “lives of the plants” in ways that are separate from and not reliant upon human intervention. Papers might cover any aspect of the relationship between humans and plants in the eighteenth century, encompassing critical perspectives on medicine, science, pornography, fiction, poetry, visual arts, and so on.

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Women and Whiteness
Katharine Jensen (Louisiana State University), kjensen@lsu.edu

Inspired by Sue Lanser’s 2018 Presidential Address, this panel seeks multiple approaches to the racial/racist/class assumptions informing representations of women and whiteness in the eighteenth century. Whether literary, historical, or visual, the papers might consider: Are women portrayed and privileged as white to counter what were perceived as threats by people of color? Is this privileging linked to class as well, or instead, and why? Are women of color ever portrayed as ‘white’ and why? How do representations of women and whiteness do political work to enlist readers’ or viewers’ emotions and to what end?

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Scholarship across the Aisle: Establishing Meaningful Scholarly Relationships outside of One’s Linguistic/Cultural Tradition (Roundtable)
Logan J. Connors (University of Miami), logan.connors@miami.edu and Jason H. Pearl (Florida International University), jpearl@fiu.edu

In honor of the organization’s 50th anniversary, this roundtable seeks to reflect upon the disciplinary boundaries that are caused by specific linguistic and cultural traditions and posit new methods for crossing the divides that continue to characterize eighteenth-century studies. We seek a diverse group of scholars with different theoretical approaches and areas of specialization. Participants are encouraged to consider the following questions: what structures prevent us from engaging with scholars outside of our national/linguistic traditions? What can we do to make ASECS more welcoming to people working in areas outside British literature (the most dominant specialization inside the organization)? What can we do to facilitate more interaction among scholars of different fields? It’s common to talk of ‘the global eighteenth century’ and the value of interdisciplinarity— and yet we separate ourselves by subspecialty every year. What would it take for us to work beyond those boundaries and create meaningful interactions (conferences, colloquia, seminars, workshops, etc.) that allow us to learn more from each other?

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Repurposing
Lauren DiSalvo (Dixie State University), lauren.disalvo@dixie.edu and Sarah Sylvester Williams (Independent Scholar), sarahjswilliams@gmail.com

Objects have long been recycled, reused, and repurposed. In the eighteenth century Habsburg Empress Maria Theresa and her children repurposed Mughal paintings for display in gilt boiserie; Chinese porcelain was embellished with gilt handles, rims, and stands; and artists outfitted Roman statues with fully restored limbs and attributes during the Grand Tour. This panel seeks to explore the ways in which materials, ideas, motifs, and subjects were repurposed during the long eighteenth century. We would welcome papers that address the literal reuse of materials, such as old canvases, paper, textiles, etc; the adoption and reuse of visual or literary motifs, tropes, or processes; or the repurposing of a traditional subject for new ends. Submissions from any eighteenth-century discipline are welcome, and topics that are interdisciplinary or global in scope are particularly encouraged.

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Art, Literature, and Medicine in Italy
Francesca Savoia (University of Pittsburgh), savoia@pitt.edu

In the eighteenth-century—in Italy as in the rest of Europe—doctors, scientists, writers, and artists formed an integrated educated elite. A wide range of literary and figurative works testify to a close interplay of medicine, art and literature in this period. Painters, poets, novelists and dramatists—both men and women—drew on medical language and learning for their models of human nature and picked on themes emerging from scientific debates (on the treatment of diseases, the role of diet and lifestyle on health, the action of emotions, the dialectic of body and mind, whether reading and writing were themselves therapeutic or harmful etc.). This session seeks contributions that explore the reception, influence, and representation of medical theories and practices in Italian art and literature of the long eighteenth century.

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The Landscape Garden: In England and Beyond
Janet R. White (University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Architecture), janet.white@unlv.edu

The eighteenth-century landscape garden has been called England’s most enduring contribution to design of the built environment. This interdisciplinary session invites historians, landscape architects, architects and others to discuss the landscape garden’s impact in England, beyond England, and beyond the eighteenth century. Topics might include such areas as selection and design of follies and pavilions, selection and distribution of plant materials, theoretical underpinnings in the Picturesque, differences between English and Continental examples of the phenomenon, women’s contributions to the design of the garden, travelers’ accounts of garden visits, or manifestations of the landscape garden in later centuries.

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Gesturing toward the Antique
Monica Anke Hahn (Community College of Philadelphia), mhahn@ccp.edu and Craig Hanson (Calvin College), CraigAshleyHanson@gmail.com

More than three decades on from the publication of Haskell and Penny’s seminal work, Taste and the Antique—an extended edition of which is slated for publication in 2019—this panel seeks to broaden, expand, and trouble the examination of classicizing poses and gestures in the eighteenth century. How might a borrowed pose elucidate themes of performativity, ephemerality, portraiture, or satire? What were the commercial, intellectual, poetic, or social stakes of such gestures? How did such evocations of antiquity function within larger aesthetic frameworks—whether a collection, a decorative arts program, or some other stratum of visual culture? We welcome proposals from a wide range of approaches with the goal of complicating and re-evaluating straightforward stylistic narratives, aiming to avoid making too little or too much of the antique along the way.

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Fashioning Power and the Power(s) of Fashion
Jennifer Buckley (University of York), jennifer.buckley@york.ac.uk and Benjamin Jackson (Queen Mary, University of London), b.l.t.jackson@qmul.ac.uk

This session seeks to redress the imbalance in our current understanding of the relationship between fashion, material culture, and gender. It desires to push beyond a notion of female fashion, with all its connotations, to consider how fashion was used by both sexes to simultaneously homogenise and destabilise traditional power relations. From architecture to clothing, books to consumer goods, the manifestations of power, commerce, and even colonialism, are imbued in the material world of the past. These materialisations of power are too often obliquely and uncritically accepted as part of a narrative of clear, delineated power structures. Addressing the relationship between print and material cultures, this panel seeks to re-expose the intricate nuances of power that permeated the eighteenth-century material world. Topics to consider may include, but are not limited to: letterpress printing and the manufacture of printed polemics; bespoke handcrafting and handicrafts; architectural plans; trade cards, magazines and periodicals; taste and politesse; the correlation of texts and textiles.

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Small Things
Chloe Wigston Smith (University of York), chloe.wigstonsmith@york.ac.uk and Beth Fowkes Tobin (University of Georgia), btobin@uga.edu

This panel invites papers that address the scale of material objects, in particular the smaller things that have received less critical attention than larger, substantial goods. We are interested in how the scale of things shapes the cultural and / or literary significance of objects and what size might illuminate more broadly about the value and meanings of material culture. Do small things merit different kinds of attention across genres or types of media? How does monetary value, labor, and time affect perceptions of the minute? What is the place of the small in scholarly conversations about material culture across humanities disciplines? This panel will serve as a starting point for discussion of the same theme at an interdisciplinary conference to be held June 6–7, 2019 at the University of York (organized by Chloe Wigston Smith and Beth Fowkes Tobin).

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Bon Appétit: Dining in the Eighteenth Century
Joanna M. Gohmann (The Walters Art Museum), jgohmann@thewalters.org

In the mid-eighteenth century, chefs began to delight aristocratic taste buds with nouvelle cuisine, a style of French cookery that gradually spread across mainland Europe and transformed food from nourishment into pleasurable, intellectual entertainment. In addition to foodstuff, the material landscape of eating—tablescapes, dining rooms, dishes, furniture, cookbooks etc.—became more complex, specialized, and pleasurable. Porcelain dinner services expanded, cookbooks included more categories of food, dining tables were marketed in a variety of shapes with surprising features, and dining rooms were increasingly elaborate. What cultural work did these transformations in food preparation and consumption achieve? Responding to such publications as E.C. Spary’s Eating the Enlightenment (2012) and Krikorian’s Les rois à table (2011), exhibitions like Winterthur Museum’s Dining by Design (2018), and popular blogs like The History Kitchen, this panel seeks to explore how eighteenth-century consumers understood the century’s new dining practices in relation to the century’s intellectual, social, political and even religious trends. This panel hopes to address the many ways in which individuals encountered these changes in culinary and dining practices—be it through text, visual art, material culture of the table, etc.—and invites participants from all disciplines and areas of specialization.

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Between Art and Labor: Craft in the Global Eighteenth Century
Cassidy Picken (Capilano University), cass.picken@gmail.com

Handicraft is a generative concept within at least two hierarchies of enlightenment thought. Within the realm of political economy, handicrafts are positioned midway between the foraged goods of hunter-gatherers and the manufactured wares of commercial society; within aesthetics, craftwork mediates between the drudgery of labor and the free play of the liberal arts. This panel explores the rise of craftwork as a distinct cultural category during the long eighteenth century. Shifting from accounts of craft that emphasize its ‘traditional’ status, we are interested in artisanal practices that emerged at the interstices of the eighteenth century’s global empires. How might we account for the relationship between the disciplinary formations mentioned above, and the actual practices of making that emerged at the frontiers (external and internal) of mercantile capitalism? What forms of knowledge and intimacy were grounded in the craftwork of women, the enslaved, creoles, indigenous communities, peasants, and domestics? How did poets, novelists, artists, philosophers, and scientists conceive of their crafts in relation to the field of labor?

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Trailing Spouses of the Enlightenment: In the Shadow of the Luminary?
Rori Bloom (University of Florida), ribloom@ufl.edu and Margaret Butler (University of Florida), mbutler@arts.ufl.edu

While the wedding scene continued to provide a happy ending to classical comedies in eighteenth-century theater, the real institution of marriage was undergoing important transformations off the stage and the page. By offering material resources, social connections, emotional support or intellectual stimulation, spouses in creative partnerships made valuable contributions to eighteenth-century culture. This interdisciplinary panel seeks to examine the spousal relationship in the context of cultural creation in the Enlightenment. At certain times, one spouse remained in the shadows to allow the other to shine as a writer, musician or painter, while at others the two shared the limelight, attracting public attention in different ways. Whether as enabler, impresario, teacher, collaborator, the spouses of Enlightenment figures often shaped each other’s careers. In this session, we are not asking whether we would have had Sade without Renée or Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun without Jean Baptiste Pierre Lebrun. Instead, we wish to reexamine assumptions about traditional roles in famous pairs to better understand the impact of creative partnerships on eighteenth-century culture.

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The Colors of Race
Jennifer Chuong (Harvard University), jennifer_chuong@harvard.edu and Oliver Wunsch (Harvard Art Museums), owunsch@gmail.com

Scholars in a variety of disciplines have argued that over the course of the eighteenth century, nascent racial categories began to coalesce around visual distinctions, skin color chief among them. The range of disciplinary perspectives on the topic reflects the many ways that color could be mobilized in the service of human difference, whether through the materials of the artist, the theories of the natural philosopher, or the lexicon of the writer. This panel provides an opportunity to bring together research in these different areas and to explore possible interactions among them. In doing so, we aim to initiate a larger conversation about the relationship between race and visuality in the eighteenth century. We welcome papers that explore the various practices through which color took on racial significance in this period, and we especially invite proposals that address the use of color in more than one setting (e.g. in multiple media, across fields, or for different audiences).

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‘This Unnatural Rebellion’: The Jacobite Rising of 1745
Phineas Dowling (Auburn University), pwd0002@auburn.edu

This panel seeks papers on literary, artistic, and material culture of the long eighteenth century with the goal of exploring the Jacobite Rising of 1745 and its ramifications—whether artistic, cultural, national, martial, political, etc. Topics might include, but are not limited to, the literary culture of the Jacobites (or anti-Jacobites); material culture of the Jacobites; cultural memory of the ’45; representations of the conflict and its participants; depictions or commentary of key figures or events; the political or social aftermath or ramifications of the rebellion; contextualization of the Rising and/or its impact; creative expressions in any medium of the contemporary or memorial experiences of participants and/or onlookers.

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Producers, Creators, Designers: Women Artists
Lindsay Dunn (Texas Christian University), l.m.dunn@tcu.edu and Franny Brock (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), mfbrock@live.unc.edu

This panel seeks proposals that consider women’s roles as producers, creators, and designers of art objects, buildings, and interior spaces in the long eighteenth century. We invite papers that further knowledge of women’s artistic production, and indeed, even reclaim their achievements. This panel will continue the conversation on women’s roles, a subject taken up most recently by the exhibition, Becoming a Woman In the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection, curated by Melissa Hyde and the late Mary D. Sheriff. This exhibition, the first to focus specifically on representations of women from a broad range of ages and conditions, sheds light on the philosophical and cultural debates surrounding womanhood in this period. The dominant ideology assigned women to limited roles due to long-held beliefs about gender difference derived from Christianity and scientific and medical tracts. As a result, historians have often relegated women’s involvement in the art world to historical footnote or anecdote, despite a rich tradition of female creativity. Possible topics for this panel include investigations of women artists’ little-known objects and spaces, hierarchies of genre and their gendered implications, the role of women in the Academy, programs of commissioning, and collaborations with colleagues.

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Innovative Course Design Competition
asecsoffice@gmail.com

ASECS invites proposals for a new course on eighteenth-century studies, or a new unit (1–4 weeks of instruction) within a course on the eighteenth century. Proposals may address a specific theme, compare related works from different fields (music and history, art and theology), take an interdisciplinary approach to a social or historical event, or suggest new uses for instructional technology. The unit/course should have never been taught or have been taught very recently for the first time. Applicants should submit a 750–1500 word proposal that focuses sharply on the leading ideas distinguishing the unit/course. The proposal should indicate why particular texts and topics were selected and (if possible) how they worked; ideally, a syllabus will be provided. The competition is open to current members of ASECS. Up to three proposals will be selected for presentation on the Innovative Course Design session at the Annual Meeting; a $500 award will be presented to each of the participants, who also will be invited to submit a twelve-page account of the unit/course, a syllabus, and supplementary materials, for publication on the ASECS website.

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Social Network Analysis (Roundtable)
Jennifer Golightly (Colorado College), jgolightly@coloradocollege.edu

This roundtable will showcase digital projects using social network analysis for better understanding networks of texts, ideas, and/or people over the course of the long eighteenth century. The scope of the roundtable is broad in the hopes of providing fresh ideas about using social network analysis for the study of history and texts. What are the advantages of using this particular approach? What are the limitations? Which tools are most useable for conducting such analysis in the humanities?

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Print Room Pedagogies: Teaching the Eighteenth Century in the Print Room
Hope Saska (CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder), hope.saska@colorado.edu

“Other pictures we look at, his we read.” With this pithy quip, Charles Lamb summed up the expectations brought by Romantic viewers to William Hogarth’s images. Today, Lamb’s distinction between looking at and reading images continues to resonate, especially with curators, faculty, instructors and librarians who regularly use printed images, illustrated books and paintings as core features of our pedagogy. This panel invites papers that address print room pedagogies and asks: how do we provide tangible connections with the visual and material worlds of the eighteenth century? What are the histories of and best practices for using visual culture to teach skills associated with ‘reading’ and/or what we today call ‘close looking’ (perhaps an enhanced version of the ‘looking at’ that Lamb describes)? How might the historical function of the print room connect to its contemporary use for object-based learning? Case studies and histories of the study room are invited, and interdisciplinary studies are most welcome.

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Living with the Ancients
Caroline Gonda (Cambridge University), cjg29@cam.ac.uk and Paul Kelleher (Emory University), pkelleh@emory.edu

This panel seeks papers that offer new perspectives for understanding the surprising, creative, idiosyncratic (in a word, the ‘queer’) conversations that eighteenth-century writers and artists sustained with ancient culture. We are especially interested in how the Classics were ‘used’ as a way to shape and sustain lives that deviated from normative forms of sexual, gendered, and class identity. Further, we suspect that the relationship between the ‘public’ and the ‘private’ will be an important reference point for some or all of our panelists. Some preliminary questions that we have in mind (but ones that are not meant to be prescriptive): what does it mean to quote or commonplace the Classics in private writings and how can this become a way of claiming intellectual and cultural territory? How do impassioned investments in the Classics create a place of refuge and resistance to public identities that constrain or cramp the self? How are ‘modern’ engagements with the ancients simultaneously a dialogue with the Classics and an exploration and fashioning of the self? We welcome papers from all disciplines and national literatures.

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Performance and its Representations
Sarah R. Cohen (University at Albany, SUNY), scohen@albany.edu

This session aims to bring together studies of the performing arts—theater, music, dance—and of the diverse ways in which performance was represented in art and literature. Considerations of architectural staging of performative events and such self-reflective devices as theater-within-theater and fashionable appropriations of costume are encouraged. Priority will be given to papers that address the performing body as a transformational device that breaks down disciplinary boundaries in the arts.

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Changing Faces: New Directions in Portraiture
William W. Clark (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY), wwclark@comcast.net

This session invites papers that study portraits from different, multiple perspectives. Possible avenues of investigation might include (but are not limited to) portraits by Europeans of orientals or colonial subjects, or vice versa; portraiture as a locus of cultural exchange; portraiture and performance theory; portraits of celebrities including performers, heroes, heroines, criminals and/or their victims; the role that furnishings, fashion, and other accoutrements play in the construction of identity; portraits and emotions, given the recent works by Vigarello and Corbin on the history of emotions; science and portraiture, as in medical portraits; politics and portraiture; sexuality and portraits.

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Interactions between Art and Insurance
Sarah Carter (McGill University), sarah.carter@mail.mcgill.ca and Matthew C. Hunter (McGill University), matthew.hunter3@mcgill.ca

From studies of brokered connectivity to forays in new materialism, the movement of artifacts across medial, geographic and temporal boundaries figure significantly in recent accounts of eighteenth-century art and culture. Yet, conspicuously less attention has been paid to the arts’ imbrication with actuarial techniques of insurance robustly used in the period to govern mobile and perishable valuables. The silence is curious. Beyond its central role in assigning value, insurance casts a significant shadow across histories of Anglo-American art. English fire insurance originates with Nicholas Barbon, speculative builder and virtual architect of what we now call ‘Georgian London’. The core collection of London’s National Gallery was built by insurance underwriter John Julius Angerstein. Where else might we find insurance’s impacts on the arts of the long eighteenth century? Indeed, should we be seeking to find any visible imprint at all when reckoning with what Lauren Berlant has called the “actuarial imaginary”? In sum, if knowing “how to pack it, how to track it, and so forth” were key concerns for the arts of the long eighteenth century as Jennifer L. Roberts has claimed, this panel seeks papers expanding upon this provocation: the history of Anglo-American art is a history of insurance.

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Collecting Studies for the Twenty-First Century: Circulation and Disruption
Anne Nellis Richter (American University), arichter@american.edu and Bénédicte Miyamoto (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), benedicte.miyamoto@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

The discipline of collecting studies has long focused on the acquisition of objects and the development of prestigious European collections in a period when collectors often represented their collections as perennial documents of family history and unfaltering taste. In honor of ASECS’ 50th anniversary, this panel is intended to take stock of the state of collecting studies and look forward to the new avenues opened up by considering the circulation of art, antiquities and furniture due to personal, political or social upheaval, and to intensifying art market dynamics shaped by war, revolution, and empire. As dealers, auctioneers, and collectors took advantage of such opportunities, modern practices of collecting and displaying art were shaped. What strategies of classification, attribution, provenance and display did an increasingly international art market foster, and what professional or institutional ethos informed these new models? We invite the studies of local to transnational circulation of artefacts from any disciplinary perspective (including material culture, art history, visual studies, museum studies, art market studies, and social history). This panel is designed to continue the 2017 panel “Art Markets: Agents, Dealers, Auctions, Collectors” by Wendy Wassyng Roworth (University of Rhode Island).

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Ancients, Moderns, and the Visual Arts
Aaron Wile (USC), awile@usc.edu and Jason Nguyen (USC), jason.nguyen@usc.edu

In 1687, Charles Perrault rocked the French Academy when he proclaimed that achievements of the present, fostered by Louis XIV, had surpassed those of classical Greece and Rome. Perrault’s declaration ignited a smoldering debate about the relative merits of the ancients and moderns. This debate, known as the Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns, has long been maligned as pointless and academic, but recent scholarship has shown that it occasioned a profound shift in historical consciousness, calling into question the authority of the past and reconfiguring the values that gave art meaning. Though this work has transformed our understanding of the debate, the role of the visual arts has received relatively little attention. This session seeks to revisit the Quarrel and its relationship to the visual arts, in all media, during the long eighteenth century. How did artists engage with the classical past and its shifting position of authority? How did awareness of cultural and historical difference affect artistic practice? How were notions of modern progress rejected or defended (and how was progress defined in the first place)? And how did the shifts in historical consciousness prompted by the debate affect artistic thinking about temporality, anachronism, and memory?

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Caricature in Song and Graphic Satire
Ian Newman (University of Notre Dame), inewman@nd.edu and Harriet Guest (University of York), harriet.guest@york.ac.uk

Recent studies of the golden age of graphic satire have confirmed the importance of caricature to British culture in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Prints by the Cruikshanks, Gillray, Newton, Rowlandson and others have become a mainstay of the critical arsenal, widely recognized as in conversation with newspaper reporting and contributing to networks of gossip about royal scandals, political intrigue, and other rumors of notable figures. Less frequently commented upon, however, is the importance of aurality to the iconography of print—the political ballads, theatrical songs, and culture of singing that is constantly referenced in graphic prints. Yet many of the recognizable caricatures that appeared in print satire—John Bull, Young Billy Pitt, Georgiana the Canvassing Duchess, Farmer George—were developed simultaneously in graphic satire and political ballads; numerous popular songs, such as those composed by Charles Dibdin, were referenced in graphic satire; and graphic prints frequently alluded to the culture of song, often mocking amateur musicians. This panel invites papers on any aspect of the traffic between song and graphic print, with a view to finding a critical language to consider visual satire and song together.

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Art and Material Culture from the Ibero-American Realms
Jeffrey Schrader (University of Colorado Denver), jeffrey.schrader@ucdenver.edu

This panel seeks to consider the art and material culture of Latin America within the “same world, different worlds” paradigms identified by the historian John H. Elliott in his studies of peninsular Spain and its American realms. According to these approaches, one may identify the transatlantic relationship as characterized chiefly either by continuity or by difference. Art historians have implicitly recognized these methods of classifying developments in the New World, although the paradigms deserve greater attention within eighteenth-century studies in light of the political shifts toward independence by the early 1800s. Topics for papers may include portraiture, religious imagery, fashion, architecture, goods transported by the galeón de Manila, the formation of art collections, as well as other themes.

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Going Public: Taking Eighteenth-Century Material Culture into the Public Eye
Mallory Porch (Auburn University), map0030@auburn.edu

Jennie Batchelor’s Lady’s Magazine project, with its public engagement element The Great Lady’s Magazine Stitch-Off, revealed an enthusiastic interest in both the scholarly and the lay community for re-creating and experiencing eighteenth-century material culture. The purpose of this panel is to provide an arena for scholarly inquiry into eighteenth-century material culture, and also to explore the ways in which scholars, costumers, and hobbyists have taken the eighteenth century into the public eye. The purpose of this panel is intentionally broad, with the possible inclusion of topics such as: working with an entity like Winturthur or Fairfax House, costuming for eighteenth-century plays or reenactments, pursuing an in-depth study of one eighteenth-century object, or any other relevant line of inquiry. Panelists are welcome to present innovative presentations and/or traditional papers.

 

Exhibition | Sense of Humor

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on June 25, 2018

Opening next month at the NGA in Washington:

Sense of Humor
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 15 July 2018 — 6 January 2019

Curated by Jonathan Bober, Judith Brodie, and Stacey Sell

James Gillray, Midas, Transmuting All into Paper, 1797, etching with hand-coloring in watercolor on laid paper, Wright and Evans 1851, no. 168, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2015.49.1.

Humor may be fundamental to human experience, but its expression in painting and sculpture has been limited. Instead, prints, as the most widely distributed medium, and drawings, as the most private, have been the natural vehicles for comic content. Drawn from the National Gallery of Art’s collection, Sense of Humor celebrates this incredibly rich though easily overlooked tradition through works including Renaissance caricatures, biting English satires, and 20th-century comics. The exhibition includes major works by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Jacques Callot, William Hogarth, James Gillray, Francisco Goya, and Honoré Daumier, as well as later examples by Alexander Calder, Red Grooms, Saul Steinberg, Art Spiegelman, and the Guerrilla Girls.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon senior curator of prints and drawings; Judith Brodie, curator and head of the department of American and modern prints and drawings; and Stacey Sell, associate curator, department of old master drawings, all National Gallery of Art, Washington.