Enfilade

New Book | Built to Brew: The History and Heritage of the Brewery

Posted in books by Editor on August 21, 2014

From English Heritage:

Lynn Pearson, Built to Brew: The History and Heritage of the Brewery (Swindon: English Heritage, 2014), 264 pages, ISBN: 978-1848022386, £25.

2557Beer has been brewed in England since Neolithic times, and this book combines a thoroughly enjoyable exploration of beer’s history and built heritage with new in-depth research into the nuts and bolts of its production. Based around England’s breweries, but occasionally ranging further afield, it tells the intriguing story of the growth of this significant industry. From Georgian brewing magnates who became household names—and their brewhouses notable tourist attractions—through magnificently ornate Victorian towers to the contemporary resurgence of microbreweries, the text throws new light on brewers and the distinctive architecture of their buildings.

Detailed chapters explain what makes a brewery work, revealing the functions of sometimes enormous brewing vessels, the astonishing skills of coppersmiths and engineers, the work of heroic mill horses and the innovative steam engines which replaced them. The wider context of the brewing industry is also investigated, bringing out the breadth of the ‘beerscape’, including those buildings put up with brewing profits such as the original Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Lynn Pearson is an independent architectural historian, writer and photographer specialising in the brewing industry, sporting architecture, postwar decorative arts and architectural ceramics. She has been based in Newcastle upon Tyne since 1984 and has published 20 books including pioneering works on seaside architecture, the architectural history of British breweries, and the architecture of cooperative living. More information is available at her website.

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C O N T E N T S

Preface
Acknowledgements
1. The Prologue: Beer
2. The Emergence of the Brewery
3. The Development of the Brewery
4. Designing and Planning the Brewery
5. Inside the Brewery
6. Powering the Brewery
7. Burton upon Trent – Beer Capital of Britain
8. Beyond the Brewery
9. The Buildings of the Brewing Industry Today
Notes
Bibliography
Glossary
Brewery Index
Geographical Index
General Index

New Book | Support for the Fleet

Posted in books by Editor on August 21, 2014

Gallery-image-12

The former home for injured seamen established
at Greenwich by Queen Mary

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From English Heritage:

Jonathan Coad, Support for the Fleet: Architecture and Engineering of the Royal Navy’s Bases, 1700–1914 (Swindon: English Heritage, 2013), 464 pages, ISBN: 978-1848020559, £100.

Joint winner of the Association for Industrial Archaeology’s Peter Neaverson Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Industrial Archaeology (2014)

L_51535This major new book traces for the first time the architectural and engineering works in the Royal Navy’s shore bases at home and overseas and the political imperatives and technologies that helped shape them up to the First World War. Based on detailed archival research, it concentrates on the remarkable legacy of surviving structures. The varied requirements of the sailing navy and its steam-driven successor are reflected in successive dockyard remodellings and expansions. The book reveals the close links that developed with a rapidly industrialising Britain at the end of the eighteenth century, showing contributions of figures such as Samuel Bentham, Thomas Telford, Henry Maudslay, the Rennies, the Jessops and James Watt.

The influence of the Royal Engineers is traced from early beginnings in the 1700s to their major role in the dockyard expansions from the late 1830s into the twentieth century. The architectural development of victualling and ordnance yards, naval hospitals, schools and coaling stations are all described, together with their key contributions to Great Britain’s long naval supremacy. Copiously illustrated with maps, plans and photographs, this important and lively work will appeal to naval historians, industrial archaeologists and students of British history.

Jonathan Coad is a former Inspector of Ancient Monuments. He is a Vice-President of the Society for Nautical Research and a former President of the Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland.

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C O N T E N T S

1. The Royal Dockyards in Great Britain, 1700–1835
2. The Royal Dockyards in Great Britain, 1835–1914
3. Planning and Building the Royal Dockyards to 1795
4. Planning and Building the Royal Dockyards, 1795–1914
5. Engineering Works of the Sailing Navy, 1700–1835
6. Buildings of the Sailing Navy
7. Dockyard Housing, Offices and Chapels
8. Buildings and Engineering Works of the Steam Navy, 1835–1914
9. Growth of Empire: The Overseas Bases of the Sailing Navy, 1700–1835
10. Heyday of Empire: The Overseas Bases, 1835–1914
11. The Mediterranean Bases: Buildings and Engineering Works, 1700–1914
12. The West Indies and North American Bases: Buildings and Engineering Works, 1700–1914
13. South Atlantic and Australian Bases: Buildings and Engineering Works, 1700–1914
14. Feeding the Fleet: The Royal Victualling Yards
15. Naval Ordnance Yards
16. Care of the Sick and Wounded: Naval Hospitals
17. Barracks and Training Establishments