Enfilade

Susan Tallman on Art History’s Loose Canons

Posted in books, reviews, site information by Editor on September 18, 2020

Willem van Haecht, Apelles Painting Campaspe, ca. 1630 (The Hague: Mauritshuis). Used as an illustration for Susan Tallman’s review in The New York Review of Books (24 September 2020).

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Note from the Editor

Thanks to all of you for your patience with postings that have grown far more irregular than I would have liked. My family and I have been well, though admittedly, diligence (generally) hasn’t been quite the virtue it was for me prior to COVID. I have good intentions of eventually resuming the regular rate of posts (more or less), though getting there may take some time (pandemic obviously continues to make regular parts of life, including teaching, more complicated). One realization I’ve had over the past few months: I’m much less excited generally about Enfilade in the absence of exhibitions. I don’t actually make it to that many exhibitions in a given year, a fraction of those listed on the site. And yet, exhibitions generate for me (even vicariously) lots of intellectual energy. To all of you who do that work in and with museums, I’m more grateful than ever. Thank you.

I experienced, however, a similar jolt of stimulation while reading the most recent issue of The New York Review of Books (24 September 2020). I love Susan Tallman’s review of Christopher Wood’s A History of Art History (Princeton UP, ) and Éric Michaud’s The Barbarian Invasions: A Genealogy of the History of Art (MIT Press, 2019). In addition to working as an engaging review, Tallman’s piece (“Who Decides What’s Beautiful?,” pp. 16–20) is one of the most concise, satisfying summaries of art history as a discipline I know of—effectively framing the discipline in relation to the ethical and moral stakes of this particular moment in time. Enfilade readers will likely find other reviews from the issue also of interest:

• David Bell on Maurice Samuels’s The Betrayal of the Duchess: The Scandal That Unmade the Bourbon Monarchy and Made France Modern (Basic Books, 2020).

• Kathryn Hughes on new studies of Wordsworth.

• Larry Wolff on Thomas Irvine’s Listening to China: Sound and the Sino-Western Encounter, 1770–1839 (University of Chicago Press, 2020).

• Leah Price on Anthony Grafton’s Inky Fingers: The Making of Books in Early Modern Europe (Belknap/Harvard UP, 2020) and Jordan Alexander Stein’s When Novels Were Books (Harvard UP, 2020).

Craig Hanson

 

Amidst Pandemic

Posted in site information by Editor on March 23, 2020

Note from the Editor

I’ve always wanted Enfilade to be an informative site for people who want to better understand the eighteenth century. Even more than that, I’ve hoped that it would also be a space that would cultivate intellectual pleasure. Amid the many pressures we all face—as academics, museum professionals, gallerists, dealers, independent scholars, writers, &c., &c.—news of exhibitions and new books, calls for papers and other opportunities were, I trusted, a welcome antidote to an inbox overflowing with countless, mind-numbing chores. With its very predictable, entirely out-dated format (it is still very much the web as things looked in 2009), the site has aimed to provide a small, incremental conception of where the field now finds itself—where you all have, as a community of scholars, taken it.

And now, of course, with the global spread of the Coronavirus, we all find ourselves displaced from our regular ways of working, living, and being. Upcoming events listed here weeks ago will not happen (I’m still stunned to have missed out on what promised to be a brilliant ASECS in St. Louis), it’s hard to know quite what to make of calls for papers (at least in the short-term), and all of those current exhibitions so carefully installed sit entirely quiet, waiting for when museums will again open their doors. I realize, in other words, that much of the regular content of Enfilade now takes on a strange hue.

With advanced apologies for anything that sounds tone-deaf or insensitive in the midst of a pandemic, I plan to keep at it, largely in hopes that the site might continue to offer useful information, as well as providing something that feels familiar when so much doesn’t. And I suspect news of forthcoming books will be more welcome than ever (please don’t be bashful in sending in news items). If you’ve not yet started following HECAA’s Instagram account, have a look: Katherine Iselin—who just recently defended her dissertation at Missouri under the direction of Michael Yonan—does a brilliant job with it. And in the coming weeks, HECAA will launch a new website exclusively for members. There is, then, a thriving community of dixhuitièmistes, even in these days of isolation.

Particularly in the weeks and months ahead, take care of yourselves and be well.

Craig Hanson

Enfilade turns 10!

Posted in site information by Editor on June 24, 2019

From the Editor

Ten years on and a million visits later, Enfilade continues to grow because of you! And by now, you know the routine for celebrating:

1) Buy an art book this week. In the world of academic art history publishing, several hundred books sold over a few days is stellar. It’s an important way to communicate that the eighteenth century is a thriving field with a vital, engaged audience.

2) Renew your HECAA membership. In the normal world $30 doesn’t really count as philanthropy. For a small academic society it does. Because of HECAA’s 501c3 status, all donations are tax deductible in the United States. So send in a contribution of $100 or $5. But donate something. We accept PayPal.

3) Finally, send in news you’d like to see reported! After a decade, I’m still not sure what surprises me more: how easy it is to know what’s going on in the field all over the world, or how difficult it is to know what’s going on in the field all over the world! I’m glad to post announcements about conferences, forthcoming books, journal articles, exhibitions, fellowship opportunities, &c. The postings readers most enjoy are inevitably original content, reports of interesting collections, house museums, resources, and the like. No reason to be shy.

Happy midsummer (to all of you in the Northern Hemisphere) and enjoy the long days!
Craig Hanson

Two New HECAA Positions, Now Open

Posted in Member News, opportunities, site information by Editor on April 18, 2019

At this year’s annual HECAA business meeting, held in Denver on 22 March 2019, the membership discussed and gave general approval to the creation of a HECAA website and social media presence. The executive board is now eager to receive applications for these two positions. Although Enfilade was originally conceived as a ‘newsletter’ for HECAA, it was apparent within weeks of the site’s launch in 2009 that the readership would be much broader than the organization’s membership and thus the site has always had a somewhat peculiar relationship to the organization. As described in the recently updated constitution & bylaws, Enfilade will continue to be affiliated with HECAA—much like Journal18—but now seems to be a good time for developing distinct web and social media presences. These promising initiatives have my full support, and I look forward to what emerges. And no worries: I’ve no plans to discontinue Enfilade any time soon! The familiar format of a decade-old blog will scroll into the future as well. Craig Hanson

HECAA Website Designer

$2500–$3000 for an estimated 60–80 hour project,
using Wix, Weebly, or WordPress

Desired Features
• home page + interior pages, some with password-protected access for members only
• ability to add special events page (for future conferences, etc)
• portal page should be mobile-responsive
• integrated donation/payment system, with PayPal or similar to facilitate membership renewals, donations, other payments
• event calendar
• social photo gallery, integrated with social media posts

Qualifications
• a demonstrated competency with web design and familiarity with at least one of the possible software platforms
• a vision for the look and feel of HECAA’s web presence
• strong visual/writing skills
• an ability to work independently and to teach yourself/acquire new technical skills as needed

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and examples of past work in web design or content creation to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 15 May 2019.

HECAA Social Media Manager

$1500 stipend for one year, 1 July 2019 — 30 June 2020
about 10 hours/week expected

Establish and maintain two social media accounts on behalf of HECAA (Instagram + either Twitter or a Facebook Group). Create HECAA’s social media tone and look. Support website maintenance, once the HECAA website is completed.

Expectations
• make/oversee/coordinate at least one social media post per week, more during times of peak HECAA activity
• generate content for posts
• use accounts to highlight the work of HECAA members, build community, and increase visibility of eighteenth-century art history
• using Instagram as the chief platform, create content that is both aesthetically pleasing and informational
• may coordinate different HECAA members for temporary account takeovers
• coordinate with Enfilade and Journal18 to mutually enhance each other’s social media presence
• keep website up to date and in sync with social media and Enfilade: update calendar, sync photo gallery with social posts, etc.

Qualifications
• familiarity with Instagram plus either Facebook or Twitter
• a vision for HECAA’s social media identity and presence
• good people/ networking skills
• good research skills (for content generation purposes)
• strong visual/writing skills

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and two sample posts (geared to a platform of your choice) to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 1 June 2019.

Enfilade Turns Nine! Buy an Art Book! Donate to HECAA!

Posted in site information by Editor on June 22, 2018

From the Editor

As Enfilade turns nine (22 June 2018), I’m glad to write with my usual observations and admonitions. The site exists because you—along with lots of others reading alongside you—continue to tune in. We’ve just surpassed 920,000 views. Thanks so much! And so to celebrate . . .

1) Buy an art book this weekend. In the world of academic art history publishing, several hundred books sold over a few days is stellar. It’s an important way to communicate that the eighteenth century is a thriving field with a vital, engaged audience. The more people who buy books addressing the eighteenth century, the easier it will be to publish your next book on the eighteenth century.

2) Renew your HECAA membership. In the normal world $30 doesn’t really count as philanthropy. For a small academic society it does. Because HECAA is registered as a 501c3, all donations are tax deductible in the United States. So send in a contribution of $100 or $5. But donate something. We accept PayPal.

3) Register for the HECAA conference in November. Early registration rates apply until July 1. More information is available here.

4) Finally, send in news you’d like to see reported!  I’m glad to post announcements about conferences, forthcoming books, journal articles, exhibitions, fellowship opportunities, &c. Just about anything except job listings. The postings readers most enjoy are inevitably original content, reports of interesting collections, house museums, resources, and the like. No reason to be shy.

Again, thanks to all of you and all the best!
Craig Hanson

Warm Thanks to the Fall 2017 Intern, Julia Bouwkamp

Posted in site information by Editor on January 4, 2018

With the new year upon us, it seems like a fine time to introduce and publicly thank Julia Bouwkamp, who has done an amazing job as an intern here at Enfilade for the last few months! Julia is another one of my former students (like Rebecca Woodruff, she was part of the May-term course I taught in Sweden and Denmark in 2016).

Since then, Julia has been busy with lots of things. She was a historic interpreter at Colonial Michilimackinac, a reconstructed 18th-century fort in Michigan where the lower and upper peninsulas touch. She worked as an AmeriCorps VISTA member in Wayland, Michigan marketing the economic development and historic preservation potential of the town’s Main Street program. She’s presently interning with the Greater Grand Rapids Women’s History Council, where she also serves on the board. In particular, Julia is preparing entries for Her Hat Was in the Ring, a national crowd sourcing effort mapping women who ran for elected office before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1920 (in Grand Rapids, over fifty women stood for election in the late 19th and early 20th in various school board and local government positions). In addition, Julia is doing supporting research for an upcoming documentary on the history of kindergarten in the U.S.

Clearly Julia’s interests are diverse, but there are typically a series of reliable, coherent threads: gender, the history of fashion, material culture, the mediation of the past, and history as lived experience with real world consequences (then and now).

Many thanks, Julia!

–Craig Hanson

 

Enfilade Turns Eight! Buy an Art Book! Donate to HECAA!

Posted in site information by Editor on June 21, 2017

Adriaen Manglard (French, 1695–1760), Fireworks in Rome Over Castel Sant’ Angelo, etching, plate: 23 × 31 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 67.542.26).

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From the Editor

As Enfilade turns eight (22 June 2017), I’m glad to write with my usual observations and admonitions. The site exists because you—along with lots of others reading alongside you—continue to tune in. We’ve just surpassed 800,000 views. Thanks so much! And so to celebrate . . .

1) Buy an art book this week. In the world of academic art history publishing, several hundred books sold over a few days is stellar. It’s an important way to communicate that the eighteenth century is a thriving field with a vital, engaged audience. The more people who buy books addressing the eighteenth century, the easier it will be to publish your next book on the eighteenth century.

2) Renew your HECAA membership. In the normal world $30 doesn’t really count as philanthropy. For a small academic society it does. Because HECAA is registered as a 501c3, all donations are tax deductible in the United States. So send in a contribution of $100 or $5. But donate something. We accept PayPal.

3) Finally, send in news you’d like to see reported!  I’m glad to post announcements about conferences, forthcoming books, journal articles, exhibitions, fellowship opportunities, &c. Just about anything except job listings. The postings readers most enjoy are inevitably original content, reports of interesting collections, house museums, resources, and the like. No reason to be shy.

Again, thanks to all of you and all the best!
Craig Hanson

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Warm Thanks to the Fall 2016 Intern, Rebecca Woodruff

Posted in site information by Editor on January 18, 2017

img_6579As Enfilade’s readership continues to grow, I receive more and more items to post. I wouldn’t want it any other way (and please keep the news coming), but it does mean that interns have become an increasingly helpful part of managing the site. I’ve therefore been most grateful for all Rebecca Woodruff has done to keep the ship afloat over the past six months! Rebecca is one of my students, and I had the good fortune of getting to know her better during a May interim course based in Stockholm, looking particularly at country houses and palaces (it was with Rebecca and a handful of other students I first visited Gustav III’s Museum of Antiquities, one of the really extraordinary museum spaces of the eighteenth century). As an aside, I’m also pleased to report that Rebecca will be presenting a paper for the undergraduate panel at the meeting of this year’s Midwest Art History Society (in April, at Cleveland and Oberlin)! She’s done a fabulous job as an intern.

Many thanks, Becca!

–Craig Hanson

Introducing the 2016 Spring Intern, Caitlin Smits

Posted in site information by Editor on April 11, 2016

DSC_0028 2Anyone paying particularly close attention to postings here at Enfilade over the past few months (really since the end of last year) will have noticed that many of them—often the most interesting and lively ones—have come from ‘InternCS’. I’m delighted here to give Caitlin Smits, one of my own students, her due with this posting. It’s been especially enjoyable to work with Caitlin over the past several years. She went to London as part of my January 2014 interim, and she’ll also be part of my upcoming May course based in Stockholm and Copenhagen (all 16 of us are counting the days). Her art historical interests are wide-ranging, her instincts are spot-on, and she’s perhaps the most effective administrator I’ve ever encountered in an undergraduate. Yes, she’s also keenly intelligent and witty, to boot. Thanks, Caitlin, for all the terrific work.

—Craig Hanson

Happy Birthday, Enfilade!

Posted in anniversaries, site information by Editor on June 23, 2015

From the Editor

As Enfilade turns six, I continue to be amazed at the growth of the siteall because of you fabulous readers! This spring we passed the half-million hits threshold. A typical month brings in more than 10,000 visits, and over 1300 of you are subscribers. Thank you.

And so I’ll extend in my usual annual pleas:

1) Buy an art book this week. In the world of academic art history publishing, several hundred books sold over a few days is stellar. It’s an important way to communicate that the eighteenth century is a thriving field with a vital, engaged audience.

2) Renew your HECAA membership. In the normal world $30 doesn’t really count as philanthropy. For a small academic society it does. And thanks to Michael Yonan’s indefatigable work with the IRS in securing HECAA’s 501c3 status, all donations are now tax deductible in the United States. So send in a contribution of $100 or $5. But donate something. We accept PayPal.

3) Finally, send in news you’d like to see reported! Years into this, and I’m not sure what surprises me more: how easy it is to know what’s going on in the field all over the world, or how difficult it is to know what’s going on in the field all over the world! I’m glad to post announcements about conferences, forthcoming books, journal articles, exhibitions, fellowship opportunities, &c. The postings readers most enjoy are inevitably original content, reports of interesting collections, house museums, resources, and the like. No reason to be shy.

Again, thanks to all of you and all the best!
Craig Hanson