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Early Career Fellowships | Göttingen Institute for Advanced Study

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on December 7, 2018

Early Career Fellowships
The Lichtenberg-Kolleg, the Göttingen Institute for Advanced Study, October 2019 — July 2021

Opening its doors in 1737 Göttingen quickly established itself as one of Europe’s leading Enlightenment universities. Named after one of the most important and versatile representatives of the Göttingen Enlightenment, the Lichtenberg-Kolleg is an interdisciplinary research institute with a strong focus not only on religion in the modern world, the Enlightenment(s) as well as the history of political thought/intellectual history but also on ‘bridges’ between the human and natural sciences. For the period October 2019 to July 2021 we are inviting early career scholars to join one of the following research groups:
• Globalising the Enlightenment: Knowledge, Culture, Travel, Exchange and Collections
• Human Rights, Constitutional Politics and Religious Diversity
• European Intellectual History / History of Political Thought
• Moritz Stern Fellowships in Modern Jewish Studies: Cultural, Intellectual and Literary History (in cooperation with the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

Please find more information here.

Call for Essays | Terra Foundation for American Art Essay Prize

Posted in Calls for Papers, opportunities by Editor on November 12, 2018

Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize
Submissions due by 15 January 2019

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize recognizes excellent scholarship by a non-U.S. citizen working in the field of historical American art. Manuscripts should advance the understanding of American art by demonstrating new findings and original perspectives. The prize winner will be given the opportunity to work toward publication in American Art, the peer-reviewed journal copublished by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the University of Chicago Press. The winner will receive a $1,000 cash award and a travel stipend of up to $3,500 to give a presentation in Washington, D.C., and meet with museum staff and research fellows.

Authors must be non-U.S. citizens who have achieved doctoral candidacy or completed a doctoral degree (or the equivalent), and have not previously had a manuscript accepted for publication in American Art. Essays may focus on any aspect of historical (pre-1980) American art and visual culture; however, architecture and film studies are not eligible. Essays may be submitted in any language; abstracts must be submitted in English.

Submissions for the 2019 prize must be sent to TerraEssayPrize@si.edu by January 15, 2019. For information on the prize, available in Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish, please consult AmericanArt.si.edu/research/awards/terra.

Publication Grant, Historians of British Art

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 10, 2018

HBA Publication Grant
Applications due by 15 January 2019

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA who can demonstrate that the HBA subvention will replace their out of pocket costs. Applications are not accepted from institutions. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2019.

Attingham Offerings for 2019

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 28, 2018

Giovanni Paolo Panini, Modern Rome, 1757, 68 × 92 inches
(New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 52.63.2)

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Next year’s Attingham offerings:

The 68th Attingham Summer School, 4–21 July 2019
Applications due by 29 January 2019

The 68th Attingham Summer School, an 18-day residential course directed by David Adshead and Tessa Wild, will visit country houses in Sussex, Oxfordshire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, and Cambridgeshire.

Royal Collection Studies, 1–10 September 2019
Applications due by 12 February 2019

Based near Windsor, the course provides an overview of the patronage and collecting of the Kings and Queens of England/United Kingdom, from the 15th century onwards. Teaching includes lectures and tutorials, as well as visits to both the occupied and unoccupied palaces in and around London. The course is organised on broadly chronological principles, developing an understanding of the changing function and character of the British Royal Collection through a study of the monarchs responsible for its creation and the objects collected. Group discussion and exchange is an important part of the course, and content includes architecture and interiors, decorative arts, paintings, sculpture, and works on paper. The course is held when the Royal Family is not in residence and Windsor Castle is the central focus. Several visits are made before or after opening hours. Regular visits are also made to other palaces and there are several object-focused study sessions.

The Attingham Study Programme: Palaces and Villas of Rome and Naples, 16–24 September 2019
Applications due by 12 February 2019

Conceived from the perspective of the British, European, and American travellers who visited Italy to experience antique, renaissance and baroque Rome during the period c.1650–1950, this intensive study programme will begin with a visit to the British School at Rome. This is a fine example of the work of Edwin Lutyens, built in 1911 in the Valle Giulia, Rome’s ‘Valley of the Academies’ and now a centre for research in archaeology, the arts and the humanities. The programme will consider palaces and villas with their collections in the light of papal patronage and focus upon some of the key Roman families and their influence upon their contemporaries. The choice of properties encompasses those that inspired travellers to collect sculpture, books, paintings, and works of art, their taste informed by the desire to furnish and sometimes rebuild their town and country houses back home.

The London House Course, 1–7 October 2019
Applications due by 19 February 2019

The 7-day London House course, directed by David Adshead, studies the development of the London house from the Renaissance to the present. It combines numerous visits to houses, many of them private, with a series of lectures by leading authorities. Progressing chronologically and exploring all over London, the course takes members inside grand aristocratic buildings, smaller domestic houses, artists’ studios and the garden suburb.

Desmond Guinness Scholarship 2018

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 18, 2018

From the Irish Georgian Society:

Desmond Guinness Scholarship 2018
Applications due by 28 October 2018

The Desmond Guinness Scholarship is awarded annually by the Irish Georgian Society to an applicant or applicants engaged in research on the visual arts of Ireland including the work of Irish architects, artists, and craftsmen at home and abroad, 1600–1900. Preference will be given to work based on original documentary research. The Scholarship is intended primarily for applicants who are not yet established at an advanced professional level in research or publication of the visual arts. From 2015, the Scholarship has been supported by members of the Society’s London Chapter. The Scholarship does not have to be awarded in any one year, and the decision of the assessors, appointed by the Irish Georgian Society, is final. The total value of the scholarship fund available for distribution is in the region of €1,000.

Application forms must be submitted online by 2.00pm, Monday 29 October 2018. Please note the following:
• Applications must be made online through this this form.
• No additional information or any other accompanying material will be accepted.
• All questions must be answered and incomplete applications will not be considered.
• The Scholarship will not cover tuition fees.
• A confidential reference supporting the application must be sent separately by post by the closing date to the following address: Desmond Guinness Scholarship, Irish Georgian Society, City Assembly House, 58 South William Street, Dublin 2.
• Completed applications must be submitted online, late applications will not be accepted.

Fellowships | Tyson Scholars in American Art

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on October 13, 2018

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkanasas, designed by Moshe Safdie; it opened in November 2011.
(Photo: Wikimedia Commons, March 2013, Stefan Krasowski)

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From the flyer for the Tyson Scholars Program:

Tyson Scholars Program: Fellowships in American Art
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, 2019–20

Applications accepted between 1 November 2018 and 15 January 2019

The Tyson Scholars program, established in 2012, supports scholarship in the full range of subjects related to American art and visual and material culture. Crystal Bridges welcomes ambitious and cross-disciplinary projects in a variety of disciplines, including art history, architecture, visual culture, Indigenous art, American studies, and contemporary art. Applicants with innovative and genre-bending topics are encouraged and both pre- and post-doctoral candidates are eligible.

Crystal Bridges is located in Bentonville, Arkansas, in the beautiful Ozark Mountains. Scholars will be within easy reach of both the lively college-town nightlife of Fayetteville and the rugged natural beauty of the Buffalo National River and other parks. Bentonville is within a 5-hour drive of Dallas, St. Louis, and Memphis; and is 3 hours from Kansas City and Little Rock. The Tyson Scholars Program offers the ideal opportunity to focus on research and writing, with first-hand access to American art and architecture.

The Tyson Scholars Program offers
• Free housing in a quiet, secluded residence near the museum
• Flexible scheduling: from six weeks to an academic year
• Stipends of $15,000 to $30,000 per semester Relocation allowance
• Access to the extensive art reference holdings of the Crystal Bridges Library and the University of Arkansas Libraries
• Access to the Crystal Bridges collection, which spans five centuries of American art

Tyson Scholars are afforded work space in the curatorial wing of the Crystal Bridges Library and work with museum curators and staff, as well as scholars from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. The period of residency may be spent in active research or dedicated to the completion of a dissertation or book manuscript. Scholars have opportunities to share their work with one another and with the public through lectures and gallery talks. Apply for the 2019–20 season in November and join a community of scholars at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.

Call for Nominations | Eldredge Book Prize

Posted in books, opportunities by Editor on September 26, 2018

2019 Charles C. Eldredge Prize
Nominations due by 1 December 2018

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is now accepting nominations for the 2019 Charles C. Eldredge Prize. The prize is given annually by the museum for outstanding scholarship in the field of American art. A cash award of $3,000 is made to the author of a recent book-length publication that provides new insights into works of art, the artists who made them, or aspects of history and theory that enrich our understanding of the artistic heritage of the United States. The Eldredge Prize seeks to recognize originality and thoroughness of research, excellence of writing, clarity of method, and significance for professional or public audiences. It is especially meant to honor those authors who deepen or focus debates in the field, or who broaden the discipline by reaching beyond traditional boundaries.

Single-author books devoted to any aspect of the visual arts of the United States and published in the three previous calendar years (2016–2018) are eligible. To nominate a book, please send a one-page letter explaining the work’s significance to the field of American art history and discussing the quality of the author’s scholarship and methodology. Nominations by authors or publishers for their own books will not be considered. The deadline for nominations is December 1, 2018. Please send them to: The Charles C. Eldredge Prize, Research and Scholars Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum, P.O. Box 37012, MRC 970, Washington, D.C. 20013-7012. Nominations will also be accepted by email: eldredge@si.edu, or fax: (202) 633-8373. For more information about the prize, please visit americanart.si.edu/research/awards/eldredge.

The museum will host a lecture by University of Texas at Austin professor Susan Rather, winner of the 2018 Eldredge Prize, on February 7, 2019, at 4pm. The talk will be related to Rather’s award-winning book, The American School: Artists and Status in the Late Colonial and Early National Era. It will also be available via webcast.

Postdoctoral Position: Shakespeare in the Royal Collections

Posted in opportunities by Editor on August 14, 2018

Postdoctoral Research Associate: ‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’
Applications are due by 14 September 2018

Applications are invited for a three year, full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate to work on the AHRC funded project, ‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’. This is led by Principal Investigator Professor Gordon McMullan (Department of English, King’s College London) and Co-Investigator Dr. Kate Retford (Department of History of Art, Birkbeck College, University of London).

‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’ seeks to establish a new understanding of the relationship of Shakespeare and the royal family 1700–1900 by way of the first thorough investigation of the Shakespeare-related holdings in the Royal Collections, from manuscripts through paintings and prints to performance records. It explores the mutually sustaining and legitimating nature of the development of both Shakespeare and the royal family as hegemonic cultural phenomena, asking the twin questions: what has Shakespeare done for the royals, and what have the royals done for Shakespeare?

The PDRA (one of two, with the other working on literary/performance matters) will work on visual culture, with a focus on eighteenth-century material. He/she will assist the PI and CI in delivering the research outputs of the project and contribute to those outputs: the creation of a website containing digital images of all the Shakespeare-related holdings, a set of annotations and contextual data; an innovative set of 3D visualisations; two symposia and a conference; a TV documentary; and an exhibition at Shakespeare’s Globe (2021). He/she will write a monograph based on Shakespeare-related art and material culture objects in the holdings. These range from paintings, sculptures and prints through to a doll of Portia and boxes made from the ‘Mulberry Tree planted by Shakespeare’. Two likely themes for the monograph are: an exploration of the fashioning of royal identities through visual and material identification with key characters and events from Shakespeare; the significance of the Shakespeare holdings for an understanding of the Royal Collections as a whole by providing a key opportunity to juxtapose items inherited, gifted, purchased and commissioned. The PDRA will be fully engaged in developing and shaping the book project according to his/her interests and findings.

Candidates should have a PhD in History of Art or cognate field, which will have been completed before the start of the role. If their PhD is not in History of Art, they should be able to show particular evidence of full awareness of the methodologies and theories of the discipline. The PDRA will have expertise in eighteenth-century material to complement the specialism of the other PDRA (already appointed) in Victorian and early-twentieth-century performance. Engagement with interdisciplinary approaches and a willingness to work across visual and literary culture are vital. Collections-based experience, such as cataloguing or provenance work, whether professional or gained through academic research, is highly desirable. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate ability to work well in a team, to manage their time and research efficiently and either have or be willing to acquire the appropriate digital competence.

Additional information is available here»

Summer Course | Women and Art

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 17, 2018

From Sotheby’s Institute of Art:

Catherine McCormack | Women and Art
Sotheby’s Insitute of Art, London, 11–22 June 2018

This course explores both the depiction of women in art and the experience of female artists across a long period, from antiquity to the present day, through an introduction to the gender politics of visual culture. Using case studies and site visits in London’s world-class collections, the course addresses the historical constraints on women artists as well as the ways in which women challenged their exclusion from art academies and artistic patronage. Students will examine representations of women by both male and female artists and how these have changed over time. The course also investigates the ways in which international museums and collections are responding to the current interest in gender politics and its effect on culture at large. Students will gain a variety of critical skills through which to understand and critique current approaches to art, women and display.

Catherine McCormack is an art history lecturer and writer on historical and contemporary art. She completed her PhD at UCL where she was a Teaching Fellow in the art history department and she lectures for Sotheby’s Institute on art from the 15th to 19th centuries. Alongside her historical specialisms she also has an interest in feminist art theory and is the Course Leader for the Women and Art Summer school. Catherine has presented her historical research at numerous conferences internationally and has published her writing in both academic journals and in museum and gallery catalogues on contemporary art.

Additional offerings from Sotheby’s Institute in London this summer:

• Art and its Markets
• Contemporary Art in London
• Michelangelo to Matisse: European Art, 1500–1900
• Rituals, Royals and Revolutions: Asian Art from Ancient to Modern
• Photography, History and the Market
• Foundations in Decorative Arts and Design, Part I: From Baroque to Art Deco
• Foundations in Decorative Arts and Design, Part II: Architecture and Interiors
• Masterpiece London: The Art of Collecting
• Foundations in History of Art
• Foundations in Contemporary Art

Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship at The Met

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on February 26, 2018

The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2018–2020

Applications due by 9 March 2018

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is seeking eligible candidates for The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship/Research Scholarship for 2018–2020, a two-year position funded jointly by The Decorative Arts Trust and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This partnership seeks to provide hands-on curatorial experience for students and young professionals interested in museum careers.

The Curatorial Intern/Research Scholar will participate in a range of curatorial activities in the American Wing of The Met over a two-year period, with their efforts divided primarily between an exhibition project and permanent-collection work. The majority of the time will be devoted to myriad aspects of developing the exhibition, Stories in Clay: Stoneware from Edgefield District, South Carolina, currently scheduled to open at The Met in the fall of 2020. The intern/research scholar will be involved with researching objects, including provenance and methods of production; organizing loan paperwork as well as conservation examinations and photography of exhibition objects; developing and maintaining exhibition files; and participating in catalogue production and label writing. The individual will also participate in other permanent-collection curatorial tasks, including assisting with acquisitions and deaccessions as well as collection management.

Eligible candidates will have an M.A. degree in a field related to Decorative Arts, American Art, and/or Museum Studies, or comparable experience. The ideal candidate will have strong research and writing skills, a familiarity with digital resources and research platforms, and strong organizational skills. A proficiency with Microsoft Office is required and familiarity with TMS database recommended.

The Internship/Research Scholarship stipend for the 2-year period will be $35,000/year with an additional stipend of $2,500 for research, educational, and professional development programs. The 2-year position will ideally begin in September 2018. The deadline for all applications is March 9, 2018. Interested applicants should submit their resume, a statement of interest, and a writing sample of no more than 1000 words to: Marcie Karp, Senior Managing Educator, Academic and Professional Programs, at Academic.Programs@metmuseum.org.