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Postdoctoral Position: Shakespeare in the Royal Collections

Posted in opportunities by Editor on August 14, 2018

Postdoctoral Research Associate: ‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’
Applications are due by 14 September 2018

Applications are invited for a three year, full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate to work on the AHRC funded project, ‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’. This is led by Principal Investigator Professor Gordon McMullan (Department of English, King’s College London) and Co-Investigator Dr. Kate Retford (Department of History of Art, Birkbeck College, University of London).

‘Shakespeare in the Royal Collections’ seeks to establish a new understanding of the relationship of Shakespeare and the royal family 1700–1900 by way of the first thorough investigation of the Shakespeare-related holdings in the Royal Collections, from manuscripts through paintings and prints to performance records. It explores the mutually sustaining and legitimating nature of the development of both Shakespeare and the royal family as hegemonic cultural phenomena, asking the twin questions: what has Shakespeare done for the royals, and what have the royals done for Shakespeare?

The PDRA (one of two, with the other working on literary/performance matters) will work on visual culture, with a focus on eighteenth-century material. He/she will assist the PI and CI in delivering the research outputs of the project and contribute to those outputs: the creation of a website containing digital images of all the Shakespeare-related holdings, a set of annotations and contextual data; an innovative set of 3D visualisations; two symposia and a conference; a TV documentary; and an exhibition at Shakespeare’s Globe (2021). He/she will write a monograph based on Shakespeare-related art and material culture objects in the holdings. These range from paintings, sculptures and prints through to a doll of Portia and boxes made from the ‘Mulberry Tree planted by Shakespeare’. Two likely themes for the monograph are: an exploration of the fashioning of royal identities through visual and material identification with key characters and events from Shakespeare; the significance of the Shakespeare holdings for an understanding of the Royal Collections as a whole by providing a key opportunity to juxtapose items inherited, gifted, purchased and commissioned. The PDRA will be fully engaged in developing and shaping the book project according to his/her interests and findings.

Candidates should have a PhD in History of Art or cognate field, which will have been completed before the start of the role. If their PhD is not in History of Art, they should be able to show particular evidence of full awareness of the methodologies and theories of the discipline. The PDRA will have expertise in eighteenth-century material to complement the specialism of the other PDRA (already appointed) in Victorian and early-twentieth-century performance. Engagement with interdisciplinary approaches and a willingness to work across visual and literary culture are vital. Collections-based experience, such as cataloguing or provenance work, whether professional or gained through academic research, is highly desirable. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate ability to work well in a team, to manage their time and research efficiently and either have or be willing to acquire the appropriate digital competence.

Additional information is available here»

Summer Course | Women and Art

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 17, 2018

From Sotheby’s Institute of Art:

Catherine McCormack | Women and Art
Sotheby’s Insitute of Art, London, 11–22 June 2018

This course explores both the depiction of women in art and the experience of female artists across a long period, from antiquity to the present day, through an introduction to the gender politics of visual culture. Using case studies and site visits in London’s world-class collections, the course addresses the historical constraints on women artists as well as the ways in which women challenged their exclusion from art academies and artistic patronage. Students will examine representations of women by both male and female artists and how these have changed over time. The course also investigates the ways in which international museums and collections are responding to the current interest in gender politics and its effect on culture at large. Students will gain a variety of critical skills through which to understand and critique current approaches to art, women and display.

Catherine McCormack is an art history lecturer and writer on historical and contemporary art. She completed her PhD at UCL where she was a Teaching Fellow in the art history department and she lectures for Sotheby’s Institute on art from the 15th to 19th centuries. Alongside her historical specialisms she also has an interest in feminist art theory and is the Course Leader for the Women and Art Summer school. Catherine has presented her historical research at numerous conferences internationally and has published her writing in both academic journals and in museum and gallery catalogues on contemporary art.

Additional offerings from Sotheby’s Institute in London this summer:

• Art and its Markets
• Contemporary Art in London
• Michelangelo to Matisse: European Art, 1500–1900
• Rituals, Royals and Revolutions: Asian Art from Ancient to Modern
• Photography, History and the Market
• Foundations in Decorative Arts and Design, Part I: From Baroque to Art Deco
• Foundations in Decorative Arts and Design, Part II: Architecture and Interiors
• Masterpiece London: The Art of Collecting
• Foundations in History of Art
• Foundations in Contemporary Art

Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship at The Met

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on February 26, 2018

The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2018–2020

Applications due by 9 March 2018

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is seeking eligible candidates for The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship/Research Scholarship for 2018–2020, a two-year position funded jointly by The Decorative Arts Trust and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This partnership seeks to provide hands-on curatorial experience for students and young professionals interested in museum careers.

The Curatorial Intern/Research Scholar will participate in a range of curatorial activities in the American Wing of The Met over a two-year period, with their efforts divided primarily between an exhibition project and permanent-collection work. The majority of the time will be devoted to myriad aspects of developing the exhibition, Stories in Clay: Stoneware from Edgefield District, South Carolina, currently scheduled to open at The Met in the fall of 2020. The intern/research scholar will be involved with researching objects, including provenance and methods of production; organizing loan paperwork as well as conservation examinations and photography of exhibition objects; developing and maintaining exhibition files; and participating in catalogue production and label writing. The individual will also participate in other permanent-collection curatorial tasks, including assisting with acquisitions and deaccessions as well as collection management.

Eligible candidates will have an M.A. degree in a field related to Decorative Arts, American Art, and/or Museum Studies, or comparable experience. The ideal candidate will have strong research and writing skills, a familiarity with digital resources and research platforms, and strong organizational skills. A proficiency with Microsoft Office is required and familiarity with TMS database recommended.

The Internship/Research Scholarship stipend for the 2-year period will be $35,000/year with an additional stipend of $2,500 for research, educational, and professional development programs. The 2-year position will ideally begin in September 2018. The deadline for all applications is March 9, 2018. Interested applicants should submit their resume, a statement of interest, and a writing sample of no more than 1000 words to: Marcie Karp, Senior Managing Educator, Academic and Professional Programs, at Academic.Programs@metmuseum.org.

PhD Research Placements at the British Library

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 17, 2018

From the BL:

William Blake at the British Library: PhD Research Placement
3 months during the period from June until December 2018

Applications due by 19 February 2018

PhD students are invited to apply to undertake one of our forthcoming research placements. These are specially-selected projects that have been developed by the Library to support current doctoral researchers to develop and apply transferrable skills and expertise. Amongst the opportunities being offered in the current Call is a placement on William Blake, focused on the Library’s large collection of prints by Blake. Further details and profiles for each of the other placements are available here.

A PhD research placement at the British Library provides the chance to experience research in a different environment to that of a university, to engage with a range of research users and audiences, to gain insights into different potential postdoctoral career paths, and to make a tangible contribution to the purposes and programmes of a national library and major cultural organisation. A broad range of research placement opportunities have been identified by the Library for 2018–19.

To Apply

Application Guidelines and the application form are available here. Please refer to the guidelines and email the completed application form and a CV to Research.Development@bl.uk. Please note that all applications must be approved by the applicant’s PhD supervisor and Graduate Tutor (or equivalent senior academic manager). The application deadline is 4pm on 19 February 2018.

Eligibility

This scheme is open to all PhD students, as long as they have the support of their PhD supervisor and their Graduate Tutor (or equivalent). International students are eligible if they have the right to study in the UK.

Funding

The research placements offered through the scheme are opportunities for current PhD students to apply and enhance research skills and expertise outside of Higher Education as part of their wider research training and professional development. They are training and development opportunities to be undertaken within this specific context—and are therefore different to the paid internships or other fixed-term posts that the Library may occasionally make available. See the Application Guidelines for further details and background. Please note that—unlike for an internship or a fixed-term post—the British Library is unable to provide stipends or payment to PhD placement students. It is therefore essential that applicants to the placement scheme obtain the support of their PhD supervisor and Graduate Tutor (or someone in an equivalent senior academic management role) in advance and that, as part of their process, they consult their HEI to ascertain what funding is available to support them. To support self-funded and part-time students, most placements can be done on a part-time basis, with some remote working also sometimes possible—see the individual projects for details.

Attingham Offerings for 2018

Posted in opportunities by Editor on December 7, 2017

George Stubbs, 3rd Duke of Portland, Welbeck Abbey, detail, 1766
(The Portland Collection)

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Along with Attingham’s regular course offerings, next year’s study programme will address ‘The Horse and the Country House’. More information and application forms are available at Attingham’s website. Applicants from the U.S. may contact Mary Ellen Whitford, admin@americanfriendsofattingham.org. Applicants from outside the U.S. may contact Rita Grudzień, rita.grudzien@attinghamtrust.org.

French Eighteenth-Century Studies at The Wallace Collection, 25–29 June 2018
Applications due by 26 January 2018

French eighteenth-century studies is organised by The Attingham Trust on behalf of the Wallace Collection. Based at Hertford House, this intensive, non-residential study programme aims to foster a deeper knowledge and understanding of French eighteenth-century fine and decorative art and is intended primarily to aid professional development. A day at Waddesdon Manor, Ferdinand de Rothschild’s former country house, will help broaden the scope of the course still further. The academic programme will provide privileged access to the world-class collections of furniture, paintings, sculpture, textiles, metalwork and porcelain in these two collections. The group will be limited to a small number to allow for detailed, object-based study, handling sessions and a look at behind-the-scenes conservation. This course is primarily aimed at curators and other specialists in the fine and decorative arts.

The 67th Attingham Summer School, 12–29 July 2018
Applications due by 26 January 2018

Over the course of 18 days, the 67th Attingham Summer School will visit country houses in Sussex, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, County Durham, and Northumberland. The Summer School will examine the country house in terms of architectural and social history, and the decorative arts.

Royal Collection Studies, 2–11 September 2018
Applications due by 12 February 2018

Run on behalf of Royal Collection Trust, this strenuous 10-day course is based near Windsor. The school will visit royal palaces in and around London with specialist tutors (many from the Royal Collection) and study the extensive patronage and collecting of the royal family from the Middle Ages onwards.

The Attingham Study Programme: The Horse and the Country House, 19– 28 September 2018
Applications due by 12 February 2018

This intensive, 10-day study programme, will examine the country house as a setting for outdoor pursuits, such as hunting and racing, and as a focus for horse-drawn travel. The course will be based in two different locations, East Anglia and Yorkshire, and concentrate on houses where the architecture, interior design and works of art have strong equine connections. There will be visits to houses with good sporting art collections, noteworthy stable blocks, riding houses or carriage collections.

 

Student Workshop | Questions of Technique in Art History

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on December 2, 2017

From H-ArtHist:

Questions of Technique in Art History
International Student Workshop of the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris and the École du Louvre in Paris, 18–24 March 2018

Applications due by 8 January 2018

For some time now and with few exceptions, instruction in artistic materials and techniques has ceased to be an integral part of an art historian’s education. Nevertheless, throughout one’s research in this discipline, one is constantly confronted with the assumption that one has already acquired knowledge on everything from painting materials to reproductive processes, drawing practices, paper, pigment, and bronze casting, to cite only some of the most familiar examples.

In response to this lack, the Deutsche Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris (DFK), in partnership with the École du Louvre, is offering a week-long workshop for art history students that focuses on artisanal, technical, and restorative techniques, and on how these issues relate to the history of artistic education in France. Study days presided over by international specialists will be punctuated by student presentations, and by site visits to artists’ ateliers at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris (ENSBA), to the Musée Bourdelle, and to the Centre de restauration des musées de France (C2RMF), among other locations. There will also by hands-on opportunities for exploring this subject, including an etching and lithography workshop, and a drawing session with an artist, a professor of the ENSBA.

Participation will be limited to ten master’s and doctoral students from an international pool of applicants. All participants are required to have a professional proficiency in the French language and will be asked to give a presentation whose theme will be assigned in advance.

Travel and lodging expenses for students residing outside of Paris will be covered with a grant of up to 300 Euros with the presentation of receipts. Participants will need to cover their meal expenses. Arrival is expected on March 18th, departure day will be Saturday March 24th.

Application documents must include a letter of motivation (not to exceed 2 pages), a recommendation letter from a professor, and a CV indicating prior academic achievements. There is no guarantee of admission. To be considered, please send your documents to Dr. Julia Drost and Prof. Dr. François-René Martin (ateliersderecherche@dfk-paris.org) with the subject line “Questions de techniques en histoire de l’art / Techniken und Materialien in der Kunstgeschichte” by January 8th, 2018.

Chawton House Appeal

Posted in on site, opportunities by Editor on November 10, 2017

From Chawton House Library:

We are launching an urgent, large-scale funding campaign to reimagine and enhance the manor house in Chawton that was as familiar to Jane Austen as her own village home.

We have ambitious plans for Jane Austen’s ‘Great House’ to reach its full potential as a major literary landmark. We want to expand our facilities to secure the house’s survival and provide an enhanced experience of the Chawton estate that was Jane Austen’s home throughout the final, productive years of her life.

We need your help to turn this vision into reality.

hen Jane’s brother Edward inherited the Chawton manor house from childless relatives, he offered a nearby cottage on the estate to his mother and two sisters.

Jane would spend the most productive years of her literary life there. She regularly came and went along the road between her cottage (now Jane Austen’s House Museum) to the Elizabethan property she called the ‘Great House’, where she dined with her family and happily ‘dawdled away’ much of her time.

The ‘Great House’ is now a fast developing visitor attraction complete with Austen family heirlooms, as well as a world-renowned research centre for early women’s writing. In 2018, the foundation that has funded us for many years is focusing its funding on other projects, and we are facing a shortfall of 65% of our income. We know Jane Austen’s ‘Great House’, should be a major historic literary landmark but it does not currently have the facilities to reach its full potential.

We have ambitious plans to create a cultural literary destination within the wider grounds of the ‘Great House’, offering larger and more extensive visitor facilities and providing an enhanced experience of the Chawton estate that was Jane Austen’s home throughout the final, productive years of her life.

The reimagining of Jane’s ‘Great House’ into a more recognised, commercially viable destination will help secure the house, the wider estate, and also our unique collection of early women’s writing and books we know Jane Austen read in her brother’s library. Our treasures include an original manuscript in Jane Austen’s own hand, first and early editions of all of her novels, and also works by important women writers who inspired her, and whom she inspired.

We need your help to turn this vision into reality. Please help see us through to the next chapter by donating to our appeal or by getting involved in our fundraising.

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Survey of Scholarly Reading Practices

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on September 29, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment (formerly, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century) is undertaking our first-ever reader survey, and we are seeking your help to complete the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices.

Published by the Voltaire Foundation at the University of Oxford, the Studies has been publishing scholarly work on the Enlightenment since 1955. This longevity is due in good part to its strong bond with you—our readers, authors and reviewers. As we move forward into our seventh decade, the editorial team seeks to ensure that we continue to publish innovative research on topics at the forefront of the field—and to make this work as widely accessible as possible. Hence we are asking, in this survey, how our community accesses scholarship—both print and digital. The survey requires fewer than 15 minutes to complete and can be taken in either English or French. It opens for responses on Wednesday, September 27, and will remain open until Sunday, October 29.

No identifying information about respondents will be retained outside of the survey responses. All responses will be kept anonymous and confidential. Aggregated findings will be shared with the scholarly community in due course. Further details concerning the survey are available here.

To take the survey, please follow this link: Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices

In recognition of your commitment to Enlightenment values of tolerance and international humanism, the Voltaire Foundation will make charitable contributions to Amnesty International and Médecins Sans Frontières, for each survey completed.

Please address any questions or concerns to Gregory.Brown@voltaire.ox.ac.uk. Thank you for your support of Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment!

Call for Nominations | Eldredge Book Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on September 28, 2017

2018 Charles C. Eldredge Prize
Nominations due by 1 December 2017

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is now accepting nominations for the 2018 Charles C. Eldredge Prize. The prize is given annually by the museum for outstanding scholarship in the field of American art. A cash award of $3,000 is made to the author of a recent book-length publication that provides new insights into works of art, the artists who made them, or aspects of history and theory that enrich our understanding of the artistic heritage of the United States. The Eldredge Prize seeks to recognize originality and thoroughness of research, excellence of writing, clarity of method, and significance for professional or public audiences. It is especially meant to honor those authors who deepen or focus debates in the field, or who broaden the discipline by reaching beyond traditional boundaries.

Single-author books devoted to any aspect of the visual arts of the United States and published in the three previous calendar years (2015–2017) are eligible. To nominate a book, please send a one-page letter explaining the work’s significance to the field of American art history and discussing the quality of the author’s scholarship and methodology. Nominations by authors or publishers for their own books will not be considered. The deadline for nominations is December 1, 2017. Please send them to: The Charles C. Eldredge Prize, Research and Scholars Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum, P.O. Box 37012, MRC 970, Washington, D.C. 20013-7012. Nominations will also be accepted by email: eldredge@si.edu, or fax: (202) 633-8373. Further information about the prize may be found here.

Kress and AAMC Affiliated Fellowship for American Academy in Rome

Posted in opportunities by Editor on September 23, 2017

From the Association of Art Museum Curators:

Kress Foundation and AAMC Foundation Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy in Rome
Applications due by 16 October 2017

The purpose of The Samuel H. Kress Foundation and AAMC Foundation Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy in Rome is to provide essential funding for curators to develop projects that require research in Italy. Awarded projects need not be Rome specific. The program, launched in 2014, is intended to honor exceptional curatorial vision and help curators advance deserving projects.

Since its founding, the program has been awarded to distinguished curators to advance the following projects: Hilliard Todd Goldfarb (Associate Chief Curator and Curator of Old Masters, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts) for Faith, Death, and Eternal Life in the Art of Poussin (working title); Judith Mann (Curator, European Art to 1800 at the Saint Louis Art Museum) for Painting on Stone, 1520–1800; Andaleeb Badiee Banta (Curator of European and American Art, Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College) for Old Master Drawings @ Oberlin: The Italian Drawings; and Jessica Powers (The Gilbert M. Denman, Jr., Curator of Art of the Ancient Mediterranean World, San Antonio Museum of Art) for Sacred Landscapes: Visions of Nature and Myth in Ancient Rome.

“Establishing this Fellowship offers curators the ability to explore further important scholarly research by gaining access to sites and material within Rome.” said Max Marmor, President, of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. “Support for travel research is more and more a rare opportunity for many curators, and we are honored to offer this opportunity, which supports our mission to promote the professional work of curators.

“The AAMC Foundation is truly grateful to have partners, such as the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and American Academy in Rome, that share our organization’s mission, which includes a dedication to the curatorial field,” added former AAMC President (2013–15) Emily Ballew Neff. “We are thrilled to present to our members, through the generous support of the Kress Foundation, such an outstanding and rewarding opportunity to advance their research.”

Eligibility
• Open to AAMC members in good standing.
• Research can be exhibition related or for written scholarly work, but should not be in conjunction with completing a dissertation.
• Applicant is required to list preferred period of residency, indicating a first and second choice.
• A letter of support from institution director, project director and/or host of project.
• Priority will be given to those without funds to support research travel.

Applications are due by Monday, 16 October 2017 at 12pm, EST.