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Fellowships | Tyson Scholars in American Art, 2022–23

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 21, 2021

From Crystal Bridges:

Tyson Scholars Program: Fellowships in American Art
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, 2022–23

Applications due by 14 January 2022

The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program encourages and supports full-time interdisciplinary scholarship that seeks to expand boundaries and traditional categories of investigation into American art and visual and material culture from the colonial period to the present. The program was established in 2012 through a $5 million commitment from the Tyson family and Tyson Foods, Inc. Since its inception, the Tyson Scholars Program has supported the work of 57 scholars, attracting academic professionals in a variety of disciplines nationally and internationally.

Crystal Bridges and the Tyson Scholars Program invites PhD candidates (or equivalent), post-doctoral researchers, and senior scholars from any field who are researching American art to apply. Scholars may be focused on architecture, craft, material culture, performance art, and new media. We also invite applications from scholars approaching US art transregionally and looking at the broader geographical context of the Americas, especially including Latinx and Indigenous art. Applications will be evaluated on the originality and quality of the proposed research project and its contribution to a more equitable and inclusive history of American art.

The Tyson Scholars Program looks for research projects that will intersect meaningfully with the museum’s collections, library resources, architecture, grounds, curatorial expertise, programs and exhibitions; and/or the University of Arkansas faculty broadly; and applicants should speak to why residence in Northwest Arkansas and the surrounding areas will advance their work. The applicant’s academic standing, scholarly qualifications, and experience will be considered, as it informs the ability of the applicant to complete the proposed project. Letters of support are strongest when they demonstrate the applicant’s excellence, promise, originality, track record, and productivity as a scholar, not when the letter contains a commentary on the project.

Crystal Bridges is dedicated to an equitable, inclusive, and diverse cohort of fellows. We seek applicants who bring a critical perspective and understanding of the experiences of groups historically underrepresented in American art, and welcome applications from qualified persons of color; who are Indigenous; with disabilities; who are LGBTQ; first-generation college graduates; from low-income households; and who are veterans.

Fellowships are residential and support full-time writing and research for terms that range from six weeks to nine months. While in residence, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library and archives at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Stipends vary depending on the duration of residency, position as senior scholar, post-doctoral scholar or pre-doctoral scholar, and range from $17,000 to $34,000 per semester, plus provided housing. The residency includes $1,500 for relocation, and additional research funds upon application. Scholars are provided workspace in the curatorial wing of the Crystal Bridges Library. The workspace is an enclosed area shared with other Tyson Scholars. Scholars are provided with basic office supplies, desk space, an office chair, space on a bookshelf, and a locking cabinet with key for personal belongings and files. Housing is provided within walking distance of the museum.

Further information about the Tyson Scholars Program, application instructions, and application portal can be found here. Applications for the 2022–2023 academic year open 1 November 2021 and close 14 January 2022.

Call for Proposals | IDEAL Internship Grants, Decorative Arts Trust

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 26, 2021

From the press release:

IDEAL Internship Grants from the Decorative Arts Trust
Proposals due by 30 November 2021

The Decorative Arts Trust invites art museums, history museums, and historic sites to submit IDEAL Internship Grant proposals by 30 November 2021. The IDEAL Internship Initiative is part of the Trust’s growing Emerging Scholars Program. Non-profit institutions are eligible for IDEAL Internship Grants of up to $5,000.

IDEAL Internships focus on inclusivity, diversity, equity, access, and leadership. The Trust recognizes the homogeneity of the museum field and will strive to improve access to curatorial careers  for students of color as a path toward achieving systemic change. In early 2021, the Trust awarded the inaugural IDEAL Internship Grants to the Atwater Kent Collection at Drexel University; The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Backstreet Cultural Museum; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Newport Restoration Foundation and the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society. More information about IDEAL Internship Grants is available here.

The Decorative Arts Trust is a non-profit organization that promotes and fosters the appreciation and study of the decorative arts through: exchanging information through domestic and international programming; collaborating and partnering with museums and preservation organizations; and underwriting internships, research grants, and scholarships for graduate students and young professionals. Learn more about the Trust here or by contacting thetrust@decorativeartstrust.org.

Decorative Arts Trust Announces Recipients of IDEAL Internship Grants

Posted in on site, opportunities, resources by Editor on March 17, 2021

Press release (9 March 2021) from The Decorative Arts Trust:

Samuel Whitehorne House (1811), Newport, Rhode Island. Newport Restoration Foundation bought the Federal period brick mansion in 1969. Five years later, it was opened as a public museum dedicated to 18th-century Newport furniture and related decorative arts.

The Decorative Arts Trust is pleased to announce that the Atwater Kent Collection at Drexel University; The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Backstreet Cultural Museum; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Newport Restoration Foundation are the inaugural recipients of IDEAL Internship Grants.

Part of the Trust’s growing Emerging Scholars Program, IDEAL Internships focus on inclusivity, diversity, equity, access, and leadership. Internship grants are awarded to non-profit institutions and require a strong mentorship component.

“The Decorative Arts Trust is striving to improve access to curatorial careers for students of color as a path toward achieving systemic change,” Trust Executive Director Matthew Thurlow states. “These partners were selected based on the impact of the internship, which will offer students experience and stipends while providing the host organizations the opportunity to continue meaningful discussions about inclusion, diversity, and equity.”

Drexel University is stewarding the collection of the former Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent, which closed in 2018. Drexel’s Lenfest Center for Cultural Partnerships is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the Atwater Kent Collection of over 133,000 works of art and other objects. The intern will focus on exhibitions highlighting little-known objects for galleries at the Peck Alumni Center and the Pearlstein Gallery.

The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC), in partnership with the Backstreet Cultural Museum, seeks an intern to further the study and preservation of Mardi Gras Indian suits. The intern will catalog a newly acquired suit, document its history by interviewing the artist, plan a permanent storage solution, prepare the suit for display in an upcoming exhibition, and write an article for an online publication.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston intern will focus on a gallery reinstallation project that explores the connections between art, modern design, and jazz in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. The intern will assist with object research, develop interpretive text, lead gallery tours, and host programs to engage a range of communities with the project.

The Newport Restoration Foundation will hire an intern to analyze their collection of 18th-century furniture at the Whitehorne House Museum. The intern will work with the interpretive staff to address the absences of African-Heritage craftspeople (both enslaved and free) as well as Narragansett peoples in Colonial-era Newport’s material culture.

The Decorative Arts Trust is a non-profit organization that promotes and fosters the appreciation and study of the decorative arts through exchanging information through domestic and international programming; collaborating and partnering with museums and preservation organizations; and underwriting internships, research grants, and scholarships for graduate students and young professionals. Learn more about the Trust at decorativeartstrust.org.

Call for Submissions | Horowitz Book Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 15, 2021

From Bard Graduate Center:

The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Book Prize
For titles on the decorative arts or material culture of the Americas published in 2019 or 2020

Submissions must be postmarked by 1 April 2021

Bard Graduate Center welcomes submissions for the Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Book Prize, awarded annually to the best book on the decorative arts, design history, or material culture of the Americas. The prize will reward scholarly excellence and commitment to cross-disciplinary conversation. Eligible titles include monographs, exhibition catalogues, and collections of essays in any language, published in print or in digital format. The winning author(s) or editor(s) will be chosen by a committee of Bard Graduate Center faculty and will be honored with a symposium on the subject of the book. Submissions must have a 2019 or 2020 publication date.

Three copies of each print title should be sent to the below address along with an entry submission form. For digital publications, please email a copy of the form along with a link to the publication and a PDF of the publication to horowitz.prize@bgc.bard.edu.

Horowitz Book Prize Committee
Bard Graduate Center
38 West 86th Street
New York, NY 10024

Submissions must be postmarked by 1 April 2021. There is no limit to the number of submissions, but please note we are unable to return items submitted for review. Incomplete submissions will not be considered. Shipping is the responsibility of the applicant and we are not able to confirm receipt of submissions. The winning title will be announced in late summer 2021. For questions, contact Laura Minsky, Associate Director of Research Programs, at horowitz.prize@bgc.bard.edu.

4th Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings

Posted in journal articles, opportunities by Editor on March 4, 2021

James Mcbey, Girl Writing A Letter, watercolor and pencil on paper (The Clark Art Institute, MA).

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From Master Drawings:

Fourth Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings
Submissions due by 15 November 2021

Master Drawings is seeking submissions by scholars under the age of 40 for our Fourth Annual Ricciardi Prize! The winning submission will be awarded $5,000, with a publication date in 2022. This year’s deadline is November 15, 2021. Remember, only essays on drawings topics will be considered. Finalists are also recognized with a prize and publication in the journal. You can read this year’s winning article in the June 2021 issue of Master Drawings. More information on how to apply is available here.

Grinling Gibbons Society Looks to Tercentenary in 2021

Posted in anniversaries, opportunities by Editor on November 21, 2020

The joys of thinking about next year! This announcement from the Grinling Gibbons Society:

Grinling Gibbons Society: Carving a Place in History

The Grinling Gibbons Society is a newly-formed membership organisation and charity at the centre of planning the celebration of Grinling Gibbons’ tercentenary in 2021.

The Gibbons 300 festival is a collaborative venture involving a wide network of museums, houses and collections, supported by the Mercers’ and Drapers’ Companies, architects, present-day carvers, designers, practitioners and individuals with an interest in Gibbons and his remarkable legacy. The festival will combine a programme of public events, creative projects, education, research, and collaborative scholarship between museums, collections, and institutions. A key part of the programme will be an important loan exhibition of Gibbons’ work from August 2021, which will also consider sculptors, carvers, and artists who have been inspired by his innovative genius across the passage of three hundred years, right up to the present day. Exploring the living legacy of Gibbons is a vital part of the exhibition’s purpose, as is engagement with contemporary practice, in furthering the Society’s objectives of outreach, education, and making links across the UK.

To this end, the Society is developing two education projects: a Traineeship in stone and wood-carving, enabling the exchange of skills and expertise from master carvers to emerging artists; and a National Award (linked to the exhibition) for emerging craftspeople and carvers, providing a prestigious platform for showcasing their work, with exposure to public and professional recognition and expert feedback.

The vision for the Society now goes well beyond 2021–22 and its aim is that it will provide an ongoing platform and focus for continued scholarship, education, and enjoyment of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century carving and sculpture, and the figures and associates around Gibbons who remain obscure in the field of study.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the Grinling Gibbons Society, being involved in the tercentenary programme, or in supporting us financially, we would be delighted to hear from you. Please email grinlinggibbonssociety@gmail.com for more information and a membership form.

We are also looking for a Membership Secretary and Treasurer. Both posts offer exciting opportunities for those with an interest in Gibbons and in furthering his legacy, or with a broader interest in the history of carving and sculpture, to be part of a new and ambitious Society. For more information please email grinlinggibbonssociety@gmail.com.

Hannah Phillip
Programme Director
Grinling Gibbons Tercentenary 2021
REGISTERED CHARITY 1190987

Walpole Library Pauses Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant Program

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 18, 2020

The Lewis Walpole Library announces the temporary suspension of its Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant program due to the pandemic.

The program has been postponed indefinitely, and we will not be accepting applications this year. We hope to be able to put out a call in the autumn of 2021 for applications with a deadline in January 2022 for Fellowships to be taken up between July 2022 and June 2023.

The Library is committed to ensuring that this postponement is temporary, and 2019–20 and 2020–21 Fellowship and Travel Grant award recipients who have not been able to come to the Library to take up their research know they will be accommodated when we are finally able to resume welcoming in-person residential non-Yale researchers.

Details of the Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant program and information about application requirements are still on our website where we will post updates as we have them. Be sure to check the page from time to time to get the most current information.

We look forward to brighter days when we can restart our active Fellowship program. Please contact us at walpole@yale.edu with any questions.

Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 15, 2020

Have you published an article on 18th-century performance studies or theater in the past two years? Consider submitting it for the Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies. From SEASECS:

Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies
Awarded under the auspices of SEASECS

Submissions due by 30 November 2020

In 2012, SEASECS established a prize in honor of its founding member, Annibel Jenkins. This biennial prize of $500 recognizes the best article in performance and theater studies published in a scholarly journal, annual, or collection. The Jenkins Prize will next be awarded at the 2021 SEASECS conference. Eligible publications for this award must have been published between 1 September 2018 and 31 August 2020. Authors must be members of SEASECS at the time of submission. Articles may be submitted by the author or by another member.

The deadline for submissions is 30 November 2020. Please send submissions as PDF files and address any queries about the prize to the Committee Chair, Diane Kelley, at dkelley@pugetsound.edu.

P A S T  W I N N E R S

2019  Leah Benedict, “Impotence Made Public: Reading Sex on the Stage and in the Courtroom,” ELH 85 (Summer 2018): 441–69.

2018  Diana Solomon, “The Jolt of Jacobean Tragicomedy: Double Falsehood on the Eighteenth-Century English Stage,” in Revisiting Shakespeare’s Lost Play: Cardenio/Double Falsehood in the Eighteenth Century, edited by Deborah Payne (Palgrave, 2016).

2017  Terry F. Robinson, “Becoming Somebody: Refashioning the Body Politic in Mary Robinson’s Nobody,” Studies in Romanticism 55 (Summer 2016): 143–84.

2016  Heather McPherson, “Tragic Pallor and Siddons,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 48 (Summer 2015): 479–502.

2015  Daniel J. Ennis, “Christopher Smart, Mary Midnight and the Haymarket, 1755,” in Reading Christopher Smart in the 21st Century, edited by Min Wild and Noel Chevalier (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2013).

2014  Anne Greenfield, “D’Avenant’s Lady Macduff: Ideal Femininity and Subversive Politics,” Restoration 37 (Spring 2013): 39–60.

HECAA Pandemic Relief Fund, Give Today

Posted in Member News, opportunities by Editor on September 12, 2020

Jean-Baptiste Lesueur (1749–1826), “Citoyennes de Paris faisant hommage de leurs bijoux à l’Assemblée Constituante, le 7 septembre 1789” (Citizens of Paris paying tribute with their jewels at the Constituent Assembly, 7 September 1789), gouache (Paris: musée Carnavalet).

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Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture
Pandemic Relief Fund

Scholars of eighteenth-century art are facing unprecedented challenges this fall as we struggle to adjust to the realities of the global pandemic. The officers and board of Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) have been working on developing resources to help our members cope with these challenges.

One thing is immediately clear — institutional funding for research is going to be in short supply this year. This is going to have the greatest impact on our graduate student and contingent faculty members. So our first priority was to create a new grant fund, and to raise and disburse money as quickly as possible to help our members.

HECAA has a proud tradition of supporting fellow members, especially emerging scholars. I experienced this personally as a graduate student — HECAA was my first intellectual home, and helped me imagine my career as a teacher and scholar. Every member of our board has a similar story. Will you join us in creating a Pandemic Relief Fund? Any and all gifts will help, but we’re going to set our sights high — let’s see if we can raise $4000 to award to applicants this fall.

Make a donation now»

Thanks in advance,
Amy Freund, President

with
Elizabeth Eager, Vice President
Amanda Strasik, Secretary
Monica Anke Hahn, Treasurer
Wendy Bellion, Board Member
Danielle Ezor, Board Member
Jessica Fripp, Board Member

Fellowships | Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2021–22

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on September 7, 2020

From SAAM:

Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellowships, 2021–2022
Applications due by 1 November 2020

The 2018–19 Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellows

The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) and its Renwick Gallery invite applications for research fellowships in the art and visual culture of the United States. Fellowships are residential and support full-time independent and dissertation research. SAAM is home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Housed in a National Historic Landmark building—shared with the National Portrait Gallery and the Archives of American Art—the museum is a short walk from other Smithsonian museums and libraries, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and the National Gallery of Art. Regular lunchtime seminars, workshops, and symposia organized by SAAM’s Research and Scholars Center provide a forum for lively scholarly exchange and professional advancement.

The stipend for a one-year fellowship is $40,000 for predoctoral scholars and $55,000 for postdoctoral and senior scholars, with an allowance of up to $4,000 available for short research trips. Additional allowances may be provided to help with temporary relocation and the cost of health insurance. Senior-level recipients of the Terra Foundation Fellowships are eligible for an augmented stipend of $60,000 for the full year. The standard term of residency is twelve months, but terms as short as three months are available with prorated stipends. All fellowships must take place between June 1, 2021, and August 31, 2022. The Smithsonian Office of International Relations will assist with arranging J-1 exchange visas for fellowship recipients who require them.

November 1st is the application deadline. For a link to the application, general information, or research consultation visit AmericanArt.si.edu/fellowships or email SAAMFellowships@si.edu.

 

 

 

 

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