Enfilade

Grinling Gibbons Society Looks to Tercentenary in 2021

Posted in anniversaries, opportunities by Editor on November 21, 2020

The joys of thinking about next year! This announcement from the Grinling Gibbons Society:

Grinling Gibbons Society: Carving a Place in History

The Grinling Gibbons Society is a newly-formed membership organisation and charity at the centre of planning the celebration of Grinling Gibbons’ tercentenary in 2021.

The Gibbons 300 festival is a collaborative venture involving a wide network of museums, houses and collections, supported by the Mercers’ and Drapers’ Companies, architects, present-day carvers, designers, practitioners and individuals with an interest in Gibbons and his remarkable legacy. The festival will combine a programme of public events, creative projects, education, research, and collaborative scholarship between museums, collections, and institutions. A key part of the programme will be an important loan exhibition of Gibbons’ work from August 2021, which will also consider sculptors, carvers, and artists who have been inspired by his innovative genius across the passage of three hundred years, right up to the present day. Exploring the living legacy of Gibbons is a vital part of the exhibition’s purpose, as is engagement with contemporary practice, in furthering the Society’s objectives of outreach, education, and making links across the UK.

To this end, the Society is developing two education projects: a Traineeship in stone and wood-carving, enabling the exchange of skills and expertise from master carvers to emerging artists; and a National Award (linked to the exhibition) for emerging craftspeople and carvers, providing a prestigious platform for showcasing their work, with exposure to public and professional recognition and expert feedback.

The vision for the Society now goes well beyond 2021–22 and its aim is that it will provide an ongoing platform and focus for continued scholarship, education, and enjoyment of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century carving and sculpture, and the figures and associates around Gibbons who remain obscure in the field of study.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the Grinling Gibbons Society, being involved in the tercentenary programme, or in supporting us financially, we would be delighted to hear from you. Please email grinlinggibbonssociety@gmail.com for more information and a membership form.

We are also looking for a Membership Secretary and Treasurer. Both posts offer exciting opportunities for those with an interest in Gibbons and in furthering his legacy, or with a broader interest in the history of carving and sculpture, to be part of a new and ambitious Society. For more information please email grinlinggibbonssociety@gmail.com.

Hannah Phillip
Programme Director
Grinling Gibbons Tercentenary 2021
REGISTERED CHARITY 1190987

Walpole Library Pauses Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant Program

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 18, 2020

The Lewis Walpole Library announces the temporary suspension of its Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant program due to the pandemic.

The program has been postponed indefinitely, and we will not be accepting applications this year. We hope to be able to put out a call in the autumn of 2021 for applications with a deadline in January 2022 for Fellowships to be taken up between July 2022 and June 2023.

The Library is committed to ensuring that this postponement is temporary, and 2019–20 and 2020–21 Fellowship and Travel Grant award recipients who have not been able to come to the Library to take up their research know they will be accommodated when we are finally able to resume welcoming in-person residential non-Yale researchers.

Details of the Visiting Fellowship and Travel Grant program and information about application requirements are still on our website where we will post updates as we have them. Be sure to check the page from time to time to get the most current information.

We look forward to brighter days when we can restart our active Fellowship program. Please contact us at walpole@yale.edu with any questions.

Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 15, 2020

Have you published an article on 18th-century performance studies or theater in the past two years? Consider submitting it for the Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies. From SEASECS:

Annibel Jenkins Prize in Performance and Theater Studies
Awarded under the auspices of SEASECS

Submissions due by 30 November 2020

In 2012, SEASECS established a prize in honor of its founding member, Annibel Jenkins. This biennial prize of $500 recognizes the best article in performance and theater studies published in a scholarly journal, annual, or collection. The Jenkins Prize will next be awarded at the 2021 SEASECS conference. Eligible publications for this award must have been published between 1 September 2018 and 31 August 2020. Authors must be members of SEASECS at the time of submission. Articles may be submitted by the author or by another member.

The deadline for submissions is 30 November 2020. Please send submissions as PDF files and address any queries about the prize to the Committee Chair, Diane Kelley, at dkelley@pugetsound.edu.

P A S T  W I N N E R S

2019  Leah Benedict, “Impotence Made Public: Reading Sex on the Stage and in the Courtroom,” ELH 85 (Summer 2018): 441–69.

2018  Diana Solomon, “The Jolt of Jacobean Tragicomedy: Double Falsehood on the Eighteenth-Century English Stage,” in Revisiting Shakespeare’s Lost Play: Cardenio/Double Falsehood in the Eighteenth Century, edited by Deborah Payne (Palgrave, 2016).

2017  Terry F. Robinson, “Becoming Somebody: Refashioning the Body Politic in Mary Robinson’s Nobody,” Studies in Romanticism 55 (Summer 2016): 143–84.

2016  Heather McPherson, “Tragic Pallor and Siddons,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 48 (Summer 2015): 479–502.

2015  Daniel J. Ennis, “Christopher Smart, Mary Midnight and the Haymarket, 1755,” in Reading Christopher Smart in the 21st Century, edited by Min Wild and Noel Chevalier (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2013).

2014  Anne Greenfield, “D’Avenant’s Lady Macduff: Ideal Femininity and Subversive Politics,” Restoration 37 (Spring 2013): 39–60.

HECAA Pandemic Relief Fund, Give Today

Posted in Member News, opportunities by Editor on September 12, 2020

Jean-Baptiste Lesueur (1749–1826), “Citoyennes de Paris faisant hommage de leurs bijoux à l’Assemblée Constituante, le 7 septembre 1789” (Citizens of Paris paying tribute with their jewels at the Constituent Assembly, 7 September 1789), gouache (Paris: musée Carnavalet).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture
Pandemic Relief Fund

Scholars of eighteenth-century art are facing unprecedented challenges this fall as we struggle to adjust to the realities of the global pandemic. The officers and board of Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) have been working on developing resources to help our members cope with these challenges.

One thing is immediately clear — institutional funding for research is going to be in short supply this year. This is going to have the greatest impact on our graduate student and contingent faculty members. So our first priority was to create a new grant fund, and to raise and disburse money as quickly as possible to help our members.

HECAA has a proud tradition of supporting fellow members, especially emerging scholars. I experienced this personally as a graduate student — HECAA was my first intellectual home, and helped me imagine my career as a teacher and scholar. Every member of our board has a similar story. Will you join us in creating a Pandemic Relief Fund? Any and all gifts will help, but we’re going to set our sights high — let’s see if we can raise $4000 to award to applicants this fall.

Make a donation now»

Thanks in advance,
Amy Freund, President

with
Elizabeth Eager, Vice President
Amanda Strasik, Secretary
Monica Anke Hahn, Treasurer
Wendy Bellion, Board Member
Danielle Ezor, Board Member
Jessica Fripp, Board Member

Fellowships | Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2021–22

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on September 7, 2020

From SAAM:

Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellowships, 2021–2022
Applications due by 1 November 2020

The 2018–19 Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellows

The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) and its Renwick Gallery invite applications for research fellowships in the art and visual culture of the United States. Fellowships are residential and support full-time independent and dissertation research. SAAM is home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Housed in a National Historic Landmark building—shared with the National Portrait Gallery and the Archives of American Art—the museum is a short walk from other Smithsonian museums and libraries, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and the National Gallery of Art. Regular lunchtime seminars, workshops, and symposia organized by SAAM’s Research and Scholars Center provide a forum for lively scholarly exchange and professional advancement.

The stipend for a one-year fellowship is $40,000 for predoctoral scholars and $55,000 for postdoctoral and senior scholars, with an allowance of up to $4,000 available for short research trips. Additional allowances may be provided to help with temporary relocation and the cost of health insurance. Senior-level recipients of the Terra Foundation Fellowships are eligible for an augmented stipend of $60,000 for the full year. The standard term of residency is twelve months, but terms as short as three months are available with prorated stipends. All fellowships must take place between June 1, 2021, and August 31, 2022. The Smithsonian Office of International Relations will assist with arranging J-1 exchange visas for fellowship recipients who require them.

November 1st is the application deadline. For a link to the application, general information, or research consultation visit AmericanArt.si.edu/fellowships or email SAAMFellowships@si.edu.

 

 

 

 

Write with Aphra: A Summer Writing Community

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 19, 2020

From ABO: Journal on Twitter:

Write with Aphra: A Summer Writing Community
22 June — August 2020

New research has made clear that accommodations for the covid-19 pandemic have had a negative impact on women scholars and their research productivity. With the added imperative to participate in protests demanding justice for black lives, for many the emotional and intellectual energy to write and research has been understandably low. Despite this reality, many universities have not extended tenure clocks or graduate student funding and contingent scholars continue to receive no additional support. For many of us, publishing is a necessity for career advancement.

As a feminist journal, we want to create a space to allow scholars who are struggling to find the support they need to publish so their careers are not further damaged by the many, many challenges of 2020. In a recent statement, the journal recommitted to its mission of publishing work that “interrogates and reveals the causes, histories, and narratives of the harmful intersections of patriarchy, sexism, racism, slavery, colonialism, and gender discrimination.” As a material way of engaging with this mission, we are committing editorial time to help foster scholarship in progress and a structure to improve its chances of timely publication.

Toward that end, this summer we invite you to a writing community called Write with Aphra that is focused on starting, progressing, or finishing a scholarly article. For eight weeks, we will send weekly emails with tips and accountability measures and offer the guidance and feedback of our editorial board with weekly drop-in ‘office hours’. These will be themed around certain kinds of drafts (scholarly article, pedagogy, digital humanities, etc.) and sessions for discussing different experiences (contingency, early career scholar, etc.).

Participants are asked to commit to the following minimum goals:
• Commit to writing about 500 words a week from June 22 to August 14 with the overall goal of 4,000 words
• Share your progress using the hashtag #writewithaphra on Twitter (if you use Twitter) or via our email list with weekly check-ins
• Attend, if able, a Zoom meeting on Tuesday, June 23 at 2.00pm EST where we will answer your questions and set goals together; there will be a midway meeting and a wrap-up meeting as well
• Attend, if able, at least one office hours session with an editor in the area you are working with and seek feedback on your work in progress; for a current list of section editors, see here.

All participants will be invited to submit to the journal, but you are not required to do so. ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640–1830 (ISSN 2157-7129) is an online open-access journal that serves as a forum for interactive scholarly discussion on all aspects of women in arts between 1640 and 1830, especially literature, visual arts, music, performance art, film criticism, and production arts. The journal features peer-reviewed articles encompassing subjects on a global range, with a global readership, and is intended for scholars and students. The journal comprises five departments: Scholarship; Pedagogy; Digital Humanities; Reviews; Notes and Discussions. Our editorial policies cultivate responsive, supportive academic work, highlighted by an open review process.

To join, sign up here»

Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 19, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities
Online, 6–10 July 2020

It was with great disappointment that we had to cancel the first Venice Summer School in Digital and Public Humanities due to the coronavirus emergency. All the more, we are now happy to announce the first Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities to take place 6–10 July 2020. It is a condensed version of the original training programme, transformed and adapted to the online modality and the circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic. As a positive side effect, a large number of seminars and presentations can now be offered without registration and free of charge as open events. Other training sessions are restricted to a number of participants and places have been reserved for the successful applicants of the originally planned Summer School in Venice.

The virtual summer camp is organised by the Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities 1 and includes four different thematic strands:
1  Digital Textual Scholarship
2  Digital and Public History
3  Digital and Public Art History
4  Digital Archaeology and its Public

Classes will be delivered by the colleagues from the centre and other expert scholars from internationally renowned institutions. We are most grateful to everyone being actively involved in the realisation of an outstanding programme, and especially to our keynote speakers Elena Pierazzo (University of Tours) and Fabio Vitali (University of Bologna). For more information, see the Virtual Summer Camp website, or contact vedph@unive.it.

Dr. Barbara Tramelli
Digital Art Historian
Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities
Ca’ Foscari University, Venice

British Art Network (BAN) News

Posted in museums, opportunities by Editor on June 11, 2020

From the Paul Mellon Centre:

New British Art Network Convenor Appointed

The Paul Mellon Centre is delighted to announce that Dr Martin Myrone will be joining the staff at the Centre in the new role of Convenor of the British Art Network from 1 September 2020. The network, jointly led by Tate and the PMC, brings together over seven hundred specialists working on British art, including curators, researchers and academics, reflecting the combined strength of the UK’s public collections and curatorial expertise.

As Convenor, Martin will lead and develop the activities of this community in close collaboration with the British Art Network’s co-chairs Mark Hallett (Director of Studies at the Paul Mellon Centre) and Alex Farquharson (Director of Tate Britain).

Martin joins the PMC from his post as Senior Curator, Pre-1800 British Art at Tate Britain and is an art historian and curator of international standing. His many exhibitions at Tate Britain have included Gothic Nightmares in 2006, John Martin in 2011, British Folk Art in 2014, and most recently William Blake in 2019. His published work includes the 2005 monograph Bodybuilding: Reforming Masculinities in British Art 1750–1810 and the forthcoming Making the Modern Artist: Class, Culture and Art-Educational Opportunity.

British Art Networks Sub-Groups

British Art Network sub-groups focus on specific topics of British art. The programmes of activity are led and hosted by network members. Membership to the sub-groups is open to British Art Network members who have a professional research interest or specialism in the group subject area. The current sub-groups are:

• Black British Art
• British Art in Historic Houses
• British Drawings
• British Genre and Narrative Painting
• British Landscapes
• British Mural Painting, 1600–1750
• British Drawings
• British Genre and Narrative Painting
• British Landscapes
• British Mural Painting, 1600–1750
• British Women Artists, 1750–1950
• Contemporary Art in Scotland
• Group Work: Contemporary Art and Feminism
• Post-War Painting in Regional Collections
• Queer British Art

Join a Sub-Group here»

British Art Network Newsletter

The British Art Network circulates a newsletter three times a year, to keep members informed of upcoming events and opportunities relating to British art. The newsletter covers aspects of network activity alongside relevant external exhibitions and events, opportunities and scholarly articles.

Sign up here»

 

3rd Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 6, 2020

From Master Drawings:

Third Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings
Submissions due by 15 November 2020

Master Drawings is now accepting submissions for the 3rd Annual Ricciardi Prize of $5,000! The deadline is 15 November 2020. The award is given to the best new and unpublished article on a drawings topic (of any period) by a scholar under the age of 40. The winning submission will be published in a 2021 issue of Master Drawings. The most recent prize winner’s work will appear in the summer 2020 issue of Master Drawings. More information is available here.

 

Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on May 14, 2020

From the Decorative Arts Trust:

Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation, $100,000
Application due by 30 June 2020 (extended from the original deadline in March)

To further the Decorative Arts Trust’s mission to foster appreciation and study of the arts, the Trust has established the $100,000 Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation. The Prize funds outstanding projects that advance the public’s appreciation of decorative art, fine art, architecture, or landscape.

Images from Old Salem and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

The Prize shall be awarded to a non-profit organization in the United States or abroad for a scholarly endeavor, such as museum exhibitions, print and digital publications, and online databases. The Trust’s selection committee aims to recognize impactful and original projects that advance scholarship in the field while reaching a broad audience.

“This new award will advance the work of our talented mid- and late-career colleagues as a complement to our efforts to support young scholars through the Emerging Scholars Program,” states Matthew A. Thurlow, the Decorative Arts Trust’s Executive Director. “Thanks to the generosity of three lead donors, we are making a long-term commitment to furthering innovative scholarship in the arts while reinforcing the Trust’s mission and promoting our broader programs. We look forward to celebrating exceptional endeavors in the arts.”

Details and Deadlines

The deadline has been extended: Nominations and self-nominations should be submitted to thetrust@decorativeartstrust.org by June 30. Projects can extend 1–5 years for final completion after the prize is awarded, but no longer. Collaborative endeavors that unite multiple institutions are encouraged to submit nominations. Ongoing projects are suitable for nomination.

Nominations should include:
• clearly defined mission and outcomes
• budget
• timeline
• CVs of key personnel and list of collaborating partners (if applicable)
• list of current funders and other potential fundraising sources (if applicable)

Finalists will be notified by the end of 2020.

Endowing the Prize

The Trust is thrilled to embark on this initiative. We welcome additional contributions to endow the Prize, including appreciated securities and IRA and other retirement fund disbursements.

Read the blog post announcing the Prize.