Enfilade

HECAA Pandemic Relief Fund, Give Today

Posted in Member News, opportunities by Editor on September 12, 2020

Jean-Baptiste Lesueur (1749–1826), “Citoyennes de Paris faisant hommage de leurs bijoux à l’Assemblée Constituante, le 7 septembre 1789” (Citizens of Paris paying tribute with their jewels at the Constituent Assembly, 7 September 1789), gouache (Paris: musée Carnavalet).

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Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture
Pandemic Relief Fund

Scholars of eighteenth-century art are facing unprecedented challenges this fall as we struggle to adjust to the realities of the global pandemic. The officers and board of Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) have been working on developing resources to help our members cope with these challenges.

One thing is immediately clear — institutional funding for research is going to be in short supply this year. This is going to have the greatest impact on our graduate student and contingent faculty members. So our first priority was to create a new grant fund, and to raise and disburse money as quickly as possible to help our members.

HECAA has a proud tradition of supporting fellow members, especially emerging scholars. I experienced this personally as a graduate student — HECAA was my first intellectual home, and helped me imagine my career as a teacher and scholar. Every member of our board has a similar story. Will you join us in creating a Pandemic Relief Fund? Any and all gifts will help, but we’re going to set our sights high — let’s see if we can raise $4000 to award to applicants this fall.

Make a donation now»

Thanks in advance,
Amy Freund, President

with
Elizabeth Eager, Vice President
Amanda Strasik, Secretary
Monica Anke Hahn, Treasurer
Wendy Bellion, Board Member
Danielle Ezor, Board Member
Jessica Fripp, Board Member

Fellowships | Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2021–22

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on September 7, 2020

From SAAM:

Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellowships, 2021–2022
Applications due by 1 November 2020

The 2018–19 Smithsonian American Art Museum Fellows

The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) and its Renwick Gallery invite applications for research fellowships in the art and visual culture of the United States. Fellowships are residential and support full-time independent and dissertation research. SAAM is home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Housed in a National Historic Landmark building—shared with the National Portrait Gallery and the Archives of American Art—the museum is a short walk from other Smithsonian museums and libraries, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and the National Gallery of Art. Regular lunchtime seminars, workshops, and symposia organized by SAAM’s Research and Scholars Center provide a forum for lively scholarly exchange and professional advancement.

The stipend for a one-year fellowship is $40,000 for predoctoral scholars and $55,000 for postdoctoral and senior scholars, with an allowance of up to $4,000 available for short research trips. Additional allowances may be provided to help with temporary relocation and the cost of health insurance. Senior-level recipients of the Terra Foundation Fellowships are eligible for an augmented stipend of $60,000 for the full year. The standard term of residency is twelve months, but terms as short as three months are available with prorated stipends. All fellowships must take place between June 1, 2021, and August 31, 2022. The Smithsonian Office of International Relations will assist with arranging J-1 exchange visas for fellowship recipients who require them.

November 1st is the application deadline. For a link to the application, general information, or research consultation visit AmericanArt.si.edu/fellowships or email SAAMFellowships@si.edu.

 

 

 

 

Write with Aphra: A Summer Writing Community

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 19, 2020

From ABO: Journal on Twitter:

Write with Aphra: A Summer Writing Community
22 June — August 2020

New research has made clear that accommodations for the covid-19 pandemic have had a negative impact on women scholars and their research productivity. With the added imperative to participate in protests demanding justice for black lives, for many the emotional and intellectual energy to write and research has been understandably low. Despite this reality, many universities have not extended tenure clocks or graduate student funding and contingent scholars continue to receive no additional support. For many of us, publishing is a necessity for career advancement.

As a feminist journal, we want to create a space to allow scholars who are struggling to find the support they need to publish so their careers are not further damaged by the many, many challenges of 2020. In a recent statement, the journal recommitted to its mission of publishing work that “interrogates and reveals the causes, histories, and narratives of the harmful intersections of patriarchy, sexism, racism, slavery, colonialism, and gender discrimination.” As a material way of engaging with this mission, we are committing editorial time to help foster scholarship in progress and a structure to improve its chances of timely publication.

Toward that end, this summer we invite you to a writing community called Write with Aphra that is focused on starting, progressing, or finishing a scholarly article. For eight weeks, we will send weekly emails with tips and accountability measures and offer the guidance and feedback of our editorial board with weekly drop-in ‘office hours’. These will be themed around certain kinds of drafts (scholarly article, pedagogy, digital humanities, etc.) and sessions for discussing different experiences (contingency, early career scholar, etc.).

Participants are asked to commit to the following minimum goals:
• Commit to writing about 500 words a week from June 22 to August 14 with the overall goal of 4,000 words
• Share your progress using the hashtag #writewithaphra on Twitter (if you use Twitter) or via our email list with weekly check-ins
• Attend, if able, a Zoom meeting on Tuesday, June 23 at 2.00pm EST where we will answer your questions and set goals together; there will be a midway meeting and a wrap-up meeting as well
• Attend, if able, at least one office hours session with an editor in the area you are working with and seek feedback on your work in progress; for a current list of section editors, see here.

All participants will be invited to submit to the journal, but you are not required to do so. ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640–1830 (ISSN 2157-7129) is an online open-access journal that serves as a forum for interactive scholarly discussion on all aspects of women in arts between 1640 and 1830, especially literature, visual arts, music, performance art, film criticism, and production arts. The journal features peer-reviewed articles encompassing subjects on a global range, with a global readership, and is intended for scholars and students. The journal comprises five departments: Scholarship; Pedagogy; Digital Humanities; Reviews; Notes and Discussions. Our editorial policies cultivate responsive, supportive academic work, highlighted by an open review process.

To join, sign up here»

Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 19, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities
Online, 6–10 July 2020

It was with great disappointment that we had to cancel the first Venice Summer School in Digital and Public Humanities due to the coronavirus emergency. All the more, we are now happy to announce the first Venice Virtual Summer Camp on Digital and Public Humanities to take place 6–10 July 2020. It is a condensed version of the original training programme, transformed and adapted to the online modality and the circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic. As a positive side effect, a large number of seminars and presentations can now be offered without registration and free of charge as open events. Other training sessions are restricted to a number of participants and places have been reserved for the successful applicants of the originally planned Summer School in Venice.

The virtual summer camp is organised by the Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities 1 and includes four different thematic strands:
1  Digital Textual Scholarship
2  Digital and Public History
3  Digital and Public Art History
4  Digital Archaeology and its Public

Classes will be delivered by the colleagues from the centre and other expert scholars from internationally renowned institutions. We are most grateful to everyone being actively involved in the realisation of an outstanding programme, and especially to our keynote speakers Elena Pierazzo (University of Tours) and Fabio Vitali (University of Bologna). For more information, see the Virtual Summer Camp website, or contact vedph@unive.it.

Dr. Barbara Tramelli
Digital Art Historian
Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities
Ca’ Foscari University, Venice

British Art Network (BAN) News

Posted in museums, opportunities by Editor on June 11, 2020

From the Paul Mellon Centre:

New British Art Network Convenor Appointed

The Paul Mellon Centre is delighted to announce that Dr Martin Myrone will be joining the staff at the Centre in the new role of Convenor of the British Art Network from 1 September 2020. The network, jointly led by Tate and the PMC, brings together over seven hundred specialists working on British art, including curators, researchers and academics, reflecting the combined strength of the UK’s public collections and curatorial expertise.

As Convenor, Martin will lead and develop the activities of this community in close collaboration with the British Art Network’s co-chairs Mark Hallett (Director of Studies at the Paul Mellon Centre) and Alex Farquharson (Director of Tate Britain).

Martin joins the PMC from his post as Senior Curator, Pre-1800 British Art at Tate Britain and is an art historian and curator of international standing. His many exhibitions at Tate Britain have included Gothic Nightmares in 2006, John Martin in 2011, British Folk Art in 2014, and most recently William Blake in 2019. His published work includes the 2005 monograph Bodybuilding: Reforming Masculinities in British Art 1750–1810 and the forthcoming Making the Modern Artist: Class, Culture and Art-Educational Opportunity.

British Art Networks Sub-Groups

British Art Network sub-groups focus on specific topics of British art. The programmes of activity are led and hosted by network members. Membership to the sub-groups is open to British Art Network members who have a professional research interest or specialism in the group subject area. The current sub-groups are:

• Black British Art
• British Art in Historic Houses
• British Drawings
• British Genre and Narrative Painting
• British Landscapes
• British Mural Painting, 1600–1750
• British Drawings
• British Genre and Narrative Painting
• British Landscapes
• British Mural Painting, 1600–1750
• British Women Artists, 1750–1950
• Contemporary Art in Scotland
• Group Work: Contemporary Art and Feminism
• Post-War Painting in Regional Collections
• Queer British Art

Join a Sub-Group here»

British Art Network Newsletter

The British Art Network circulates a newsletter three times a year, to keep members informed of upcoming events and opportunities relating to British art. The newsletter covers aspects of network activity alongside relevant external exhibitions and events, opportunities and scholarly articles.

Sign up here»

 

3rd Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 6, 2020

From Master Drawings:

Third Annual Ricciardi Prize from Master Drawings
Submissions due by 15 November 2020

Master Drawings is now accepting submissions for the 3rd Annual Ricciardi Prize of $5,000! The deadline is 15 November 2020. The award is given to the best new and unpublished article on a drawings topic (of any period) by a scholar under the age of 40. The winning submission will be published in a 2021 issue of Master Drawings. The most recent prize winner’s work will appear in the summer 2020 issue of Master Drawings. More information is available here.

 

Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on May 14, 2020

From the Decorative Arts Trust:

Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation, $100,000
Application due by 30 June 2020 (extended from the original deadline in March)

To further the Decorative Arts Trust’s mission to foster appreciation and study of the arts, the Trust has established the $100,000 Decorative Arts Trust Prize for Excellence and Innovation. The Prize funds outstanding projects that advance the public’s appreciation of decorative art, fine art, architecture, or landscape.

Images from Old Salem and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

The Prize shall be awarded to a non-profit organization in the United States or abroad for a scholarly endeavor, such as museum exhibitions, print and digital publications, and online databases. The Trust’s selection committee aims to recognize impactful and original projects that advance scholarship in the field while reaching a broad audience.

“This new award will advance the work of our talented mid- and late-career colleagues as a complement to our efforts to support young scholars through the Emerging Scholars Program,” states Matthew A. Thurlow, the Decorative Arts Trust’s Executive Director. “Thanks to the generosity of three lead donors, we are making a long-term commitment to furthering innovative scholarship in the arts while reinforcing the Trust’s mission and promoting our broader programs. We look forward to celebrating exceptional endeavors in the arts.”

Details and Deadlines

The deadline has been extended: Nominations and self-nominations should be submitted to thetrust@decorativeartstrust.org by June 30. Projects can extend 1–5 years for final completion after the prize is awarded, but no longer. Collaborative endeavors that unite multiple institutions are encouraged to submit nominations. Ongoing projects are suitable for nomination.

Nominations should include:
• clearly defined mission and outcomes
• budget
• timeline
• CVs of key personnel and list of collaborating partners (if applicable)
• list of current funders and other potential fundraising sources (if applicable)

Finalists will be notified by the end of 2020.

Endowing the Prize

The Trust is thrilled to embark on this initiative. We welcome additional contributions to endow the Prize, including appreciated securities and IRA and other retirement fund disbursements.

Read the blog post announcing the Prize.

Summer Course | From Print to Paint

Posted in opportunities by Editor on February 23, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

From Print to Paint: Histories and Methods of Artistic Production
Utrecht, 13–17 July 2020

Applications due by 1 April 2020

How do artists master their art? Does painting in oil result in different working procedures and visual effects compared to other media? Which material and technical properties determine the creative possibilities of prints, sculptures, and the applied arts? What can art historians learn from re-making art, re-working historical recipes, or reproducing material objects? This course will immerse you in discussions related to art production and (re-)making, materials and materiality, and techniques and technology.

This course is highly interactive and has a firm hands-on component. It integrates methods typical for the humanities and historical disciplines with practical work in the studio or lab. At one moment you may find yourself decoding a recipe for writing ink in a historical manuscript; at another moment you might be introduced to the practicalities of the printing press. During one lab session you might be mixing pigment with different binding media to make oil and tempera paint, and on the next day you might be working with fire to cast a small metal object. You will benefit from Utrecht University’s Kunstlab and the research and expertise of the ERC-funded research project ARTECHNE. Upon completion, you will have deepened your knowledge in the artistic production of art with insights from recent developments in technical art history and heritage studies. This is the one-week version of the course. You can also choose to participate in the extended version (two weeks) that includes visits to museums throughout the Netherlands.

Lecturers
Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen (main lecturer), Sven Dupré (guest speaker), Mireille Cornelis (guest speaker)

Target audience
Students who wish to take this course should have some academic training, as there will be substantial readings and intensive discussions. This course is also suitable for MA and PhD students who wish to apply historical remaking as a methodology and learn practical skills, as no previous experience in artistic production and making is required.

Course fee for the one-week version
€650 (included: course + course materials)
Housing fee: €200

Course fee for the extended version
€1150 (included: course + course materials + travel costs and entry fees to site visits)
Housing fee: €350

Housing through Utrecht Summer School. Summer school housing is optional. Students can also choose to arrange their own accommodation.

How to apply?
Please include a brief motivation to introduce who you are and why you want to take this course. This is to help the instructors learn the level of experience to better plan the lab sessions. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. As there is limited space in the lab, interested participants are advised to apply as soon as possible.

More information
Please contact the Course Director and ARTECHNE Project Associate Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen at w.h.chen@uu.nl.

Antwerp Summer School in Digital Humanities, 2020

Posted in opportunities by Editor on February 2, 2020

From the University of Antwerp:

Antwerp Summer School in Digital Humanities: Making a Digital Edition, Basic Skills and Technologies
University of Antwerp, 29 June — 3 July 2020

Applications due by 16 March (early bird) or 6 April 2020

From 29 June to 3 July 2020, the University of Antwerp’s Centre for Digital humanities and literary Criticism (ACDC) is organising its third annual Summer School in Digital Humanities. The summer school will exist of an intensive 5-day entry level hands-on course on making digital scholarly editions. Over the course of the week, participants will gradually learn how to transcribe and describe textual cultural heritage documents in TEI-compliant XML, process their transcriptions using related X-technologies (Xpath and XSLT), and prepare them for the web. Specifically, participants will set up a Local Area Network of Raspberry Pi minicomputers to develop an eXist-db XML database for hosting and sharing their materials in the form of a digital scholarly edition.

As students will be introduced to these technologies step by step, the course requires no prior skills or knowledge – other than to complete a minor autodidactic exercise to make sure everyone has a basic understanding of some of the core technologies the course will build on (HTML, CSS, Command Line).

The organizers are happy to announce that the summer school’s keynote lecture will be presented by Dr. Elena Pierazzo, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Tours, at the Centre d’Études Superieures de la Renaissance where she directs the MA program in Digital Humanities and approaches to the digitisation of cultural heritage materials (Intelligence des Patronises). Professor Pierazzo has been the Chair of the Text Encoding Initiative for two mandates, and has served for two mandates in the TEI Technical Council and was involved in the TEI user-community, with a special interest in the transcription, edition and cataloguing of modern and medieval manuscripts. She was co-chairs the working group on digital editions of the European Network NeDiMAH and one of the scientist in chief for DiXiT  a Marie Curie ITN devoted to the training of doctoral students to the practice of digital scholarly editing. And in 2019, she was invited by the ADHO (Alliance of the Digital Humanities Organisation) as the co-Chair of the Program Committee of the DH2019 in Utrecht. Although this lecture is part of the summer school’s official programme, the keynote will be organised in the context of the University of Antwerp’s platform{DH} Lecture Series, and opened up to the larger public.

Registration for the summer starts from €150 (early bird) and closes on Monday 6 April (regular). For more information on the application procedure, please visit our registration page.

As a training event, the summer school is organised in conjunction with CLARIAH-VL – a collaborative infrastructure project across Flemish universities to which ACDC and the platform{DH} are affiliated. We look forward to welcoming you in Antwerp this summer!

Seminar | How to Write Articles for Publication

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 28, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

How to Write Articles for Publication
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, 22 April 2020

Applications due by 2 March 2020

Join the editorial board of Master Drawings journal to learn strategies for translating your research into an article. A series of presentations will be followed by an interactive session in which participants will be divided into smaller groups to work closely with one of the journal’s editors. The seminar is open to 20 recent Ph.D. recipients and advanced graduate students in the history of art whose work focuses on drawings. The course takes place at The Morgan Library & Museum on Wednesday, April 22nd. The application deadline is March 2nd and should be submitted electronically with the subject header ‘Writing Seminar’ to administrator@masterdrawings.org. Participants will be notified by 1 April 2020. More information, as well as the online application form is available here. The seminar is made possible through the generous support of Baymeath Art Trust.