Enfilade

Attingham Offerings for 2020

Posted in opportunities by Editor on December 21, 2019

Francis Wheatley, The Earl of Aldborough Reviewing Volunteers at Belan House, County Kildare, 1782 (later changes ca.1787 and extended ca.1810), oil on canvas, 155 × 265 cm (National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, bequeathed by James de Rothschild, 1957).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Next year’s Attingham offerings:

The Attingham Study Programme: The Historic House in Ireland, 3–11 June 2020
Applications due by 27 January 2020

This intensive nine-day study programme will examine the Irish country house and its wider estate, in the context of its changing ownership and presentation. Some visits will focus on houses with original decorative schemes and collections, allowing members to study the unique features of Irish design, while others will look at houses as the setting for outdoor and leisure pursuits.

The programme’s first base will be the Centre for the Study of Historic Irish Houses and Estates at the University of Maynooth, from where it is planned to visit Carton House and Castletown House, both significant Palladian villas, whose interior decoration was conceived by the Lennox sisters; the latter complemented by a series of rare estate buildings and monuments. We will also explore the Casino at Marino, Newbridge House, and Leixlip Castle, Co. Kildare, bought by the Hon. Desmond Guinness in 1958, and from where the Irish Georgian Society was founded.

The course will travel south to Cork through Waterford via Monksgrange House in Co. Wexford, where Irish Arts and Crafts furniture was made in the 1920s and which has a delightful ‘Lutyenesque’ garden. There will also be a short visit to the Dunbrody Famine Ship at New Ross which carried thousands of emigrants to North America in the 1840s. From Cork the Neo-Classical interiors at Fota House will be explored, as well as the romantic waterside retreat of Bantry House on the south-west coast. We also plan to visit Curraghmore, home of the Marquess of Waterford, whose ancestors arrived in 1170, and Lismore Castle, the seat of the Devonshires in Ireland.

The study programme will be directed by Elizabeth Jamieson and will include visits to other privately-owned houses as well those listed. It will be supported by a series of lectures and seminars delivered by expert speakers. The course will start and finish in the historic city of Dublin.

69th Attingham Summer School, 2–19 July 2020
Applications due by 27 January 2020

The 69th Attingham Summer School, an 18-day residential course directed by David Adshead and Tessa Wild, will visit country houses in Sussex, Oxfordshire, Derbyshire, Northamptonshire, and Norfolk. From West Dean, our first base, we will study, among other houses and gardens: the complex overlays of Arundel Castle, the ancestral seat of the Dukes of Norfolk; Petworth House, where the patronage of great British artists such as Turner and Flaxman enrich its Baroque interiors; Uppark, a Grand Tour house; Standen, an Arts and Crafts reinterpretation of the country house.

In the Midlands a series of related houses will be examined: Hardwick Hall, unique among Elizabethan houses for its survival of late 16th-century decoration and contents; Bolsover Castle, a Jacobean masque setting frozen in stone; and Chatsworth, where the collections and gardens of the Dukes of Devonshire span more than four centuries. Other highlights include the superb collections and landscaped gardens at Boughton House, ‘the English Versailles’; Calke Abbey, with its left ‘as found’ interiors; and the crisp neo-Classical Kedleston Hall.

Based in Norwich, the final part of the course will explore the estates and collections of Norfolk, a coastal county of rich contrasts and exceptional houses.  Our itinerary will include Blickling, the fine Jacobean house of Sir Henry Hobart and later of the Earls of Buckingham, renowned for its Long Gallery and superb book collection; Felbrigg Hall, a 17th-century house with important Grand Tour collections and mid 18th-century interiors by James Paine; Houghton Hall, the great Palladian country seat of Sir Robert Walpole the first ‘Prime Minister’, with its unrivaled work by William Kent; and Sheringham Park, a favorite work of Humphry Repton, for which he produced one of his famous Red Books. 

Throughout the course, lectures, seminars, and discussions will be held on all aspects of the country house including conservation and restoration, display and interpretation. Several private houses and collections will also be visited.

Royal Collection Studies, 6–15 September 2020
Applications due by 7 February 2020

Directed by Rebecca Lyons and run on behalf of Royal Collection Trust, this strenuous 10-day course is based near Windsor and will visit royal palaces in and around London with specialist tutors (many from the Royal Collection Trust) and study the patronage and collecting of the Royal Family.

From College Library to Country House, 14–18 September 2020
Applications due by 12 February 2020

From College Library to Country House is conceived from the perspective of the British aristocracy and gentry whose education centered upon preparing to run the country estate, including house and collections, and will argue for the importance of the library and the book collection in this process. This intensive residential course is based in the exceptional surroundings of Clare College in the center of the University of Cambridge. Directed by Andrew Moore, the programme focuses upon a series of iconic libraries including those at Houghton Hall and Holkham Hall.

French Eighteenth-Century Studies at the Wallace Collection, 5–9 October 2020
Applications due by 25 February 2020

Directed by Helen Jacobsen, this 5-day non-residential program aims to foster a deeper knowledge and understanding of French 18th-century fine and decorative art. Based at the Wallace Collection with one full study day at Waddesdon Manor this course is intended primarily to aid professional development with object-based study.

ASECS 2020, Saint Louis Art Museum Workshop

Posted in conferences (to attend), on site, opportunities by Editor on December 16, 2019

John Greenwood, Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam, ca.1752–58, oil on bed ticking, 38 × 75 inches
(Saint Louis Art Museum)

◊   ◊   ◊   ◊   ◊

In conjunction with the 2020 meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies in St. Louis, 19–21 March, Amy Torbert and Brittany Luberda are organizing a pre-conference workshop at the Saint Louis Art Museum. A draft program for the conference is now available from ASECS, and I’ll post sessions of particular relevance for art historians here after the new year. Conference registration details are also now available. CH

Introduction to Saint Louis Art Museum Eighteenth-Century Collections
Wednesday, 18 March 2020, 1:00–5:00pm

Applications due by 31 December 2019

The pre-conference workshop will consist of dialogues among curators, field experts, and attendees on topics including global encounter, intermateriality, politics of empire, social histories, production processes, and curating the eighteenth century. These conversations will be held in the galleries in front of highlights such as colonial silver, European porcelain, Chinese bronzes and exportware, Peruvian textiles, and paintings including John Greenwood’s Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam (ca.1752–58) and François-André Vincent’s Arria and Paetus (1784). The event will include the opportunity to study works from storage rarely on view and to visit the Print Study Room.

Scholars and curators of all disciplines are invited to register. As numbers are limited due to spatial constraints, please apply by sending a brief email describing your interest, along with any questions you may have, to eighteenthcenturyatslam@gmail.com by 31 December 2019. Confirmed participants will be contacted by the workshop organizers, Amy Torbert (Saint Louis Art Museum) and Brittany Luberda (Baltimore Museum of Art), by 20 January 2020.

The workshop will be held at the Museum on Wednesday, 18 March 2020, from 1:00–5:00pm. Participants must arrange their own transportation. The Museum is a 30-minute drive from the airport and a 20-minute drive from the hotel. Contact information will be provided to the participants to facilitate sharing of Uber, Lyft or other transportation.

Call for Applications | Masterclass on Wax-Resin Linings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 22, 2019

From the programme flyer:

Conserving Canvas Initiative — The Dutch Method Unfolded: Masterclass on Wax-Resin Linings
University of Amsterdam, 29 June — 10 July 2020

Applications due by 14 December 2019

The Department of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) is pleased to announce The Dutch Method Unfolded, a masterclass on wax-resin linings to be held at the UvA from 29 June to 10 July 2020. The two-week program is supported by the Getty Foundation as part of its Conserving Canvas initiative.

The goal of the masterclass is to disseminate knowledge on the history of wax-resin linings, a remedial conservation method invented in the Netherlands in the first half of the 19th century and extensively used by paintings conservators in Europe and abroad until the 1970s. The masterclass will also inform on the impact of wax-resin linings on the physical and material characteristics of paintings. Furthermore, it will provide a platform to share expertise and reflect on the consequences of the method for today’s conservation of lined paintings.

The masterclass is a joint initiative of the University of Amsterdam with the following Dutch museums: Frans Hals Museum, Amsterdam Museum, Mauritshuis, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, and Van Gogh Museum, in collaboration with the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE) and the Stichting Restauratie Atelier Limburg (SRAL).
The masterclass is offered to a group of maximum 14 mid-career professionals in conservation including conservators of cultural heritage, art historians, curators, collection manager, and conservation scientists. The participants of the masterclass will receive funding for travel and accommodation.

The participants of the masterclass will be selected via an open call which closing date is 14 December 2019. Further information regarding registration and the program, is available here. For inquiries, please contact the program organization at wax-resin-fgw@uva.nl. Further information on the Getty’s initiative can be found here.

Call for Submissions | Percy G. Adams Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 4, 2019

From SEASACS:

Percy G. Adams Prize, SEASECS
Submissions due by 30 November 2019

The Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) awards a biennial prize of $500 for the best article on an eighteenth-century subject published in a scholarly journal, annual, or collection. Eligible publications for this year must have been published between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019. Authors must be members of SEASECS at the time of submission. Articles may be submitted by the author or by another member. The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2019. Please send submissions as PDF files, and address any queries about the prize to the Committee Chair, Amanda Strasik, at Amanda.Strasik@eku.edu.

Master Drawings, Ricciardi Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 6, 2019

From Master Drawings:

Master Drawings, Ricciardi Prize
Applications due by 15 December 2019

Master Drawings announces an extended deadline of 15 December for submissions to the second annual Ricciardi prize. $5,000 for the best new and unpublished article on a drawings topic (of any period) by a scholar under the age of 40.

The average length is between 2,500 and 3,750 words, with five to twenty illustrations. Submissions should be no longer than 10,000 words and have no more than 100 footnotes. Please note that all submissions must be in article form, following the format of the journal. We will not consider submissions of seminar papers, dissertation chapters, or other written material that has not been adapted into the format of a journal article. Articles may be submitted in any language.

Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on September 29, 2019

With more information available through CAA:

Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants
Applications due by 15 January 2020

The College Art Association is pleased to announce its administration of the Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants, which provide support to doctoral, postdoctoral, and senior scholars from both the US and outside the US for research topics dedicated to the art and visual culture of the United States prior to 1980. The grants foster firsthand engagement with American artworks and art-historical resources; build networks for non-US-based scholars studying American art; and expand access to artworks, scholarly materials, and communities for US-based scholars studying American art in an international context.

Now administered and juried by CAA, this grant program was initiated by the Terra Foundation in 2003 to fund European candidates. It was expanded to reach candidates worldwide in 2012 and opened to US-based researchers in 2017 to travel abroad, developing American art scholar networks around the world with a total of 173 grantees since its inception.

“We are excited to expand our partnership with the Terra Foundation to provide continued support for scholars of American art,” said David Raizman, interim executive director of CAA. “Research funding for domestic and international scholars is essential to the vitality of the field, and these generous grants from the Terra Foundation will facilitate the advancement of their work. The inclusion of international scholars for these grants is especially gratifying, as it promotes new perspectives and engages the wider scholarly community.”

Awards of up to $9,000 will be granted on a per project basis by a jury formed by CAA. The first awards will be announced in March of 2020.

CAA’s administration of the Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants continues a long history at CAA of supporting travel and scholarship for professionals and students in the visual arts and design. Other grants offered by CAA include the Professional Development Fellowships for Graduate Students, the Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, the Millard Meiss Publication Fund, the CAA Getty International Program, Travel Grants to the CAA Annual Conference, and introduced last year, the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

Call for Essays | Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize 2019

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on September 16, 2019

From ArtHist.net (9 September 2019) . . .

Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize 2019
Submissions due by 1 December 2019

The Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize for Early Career Researchers is now open for submissions until 1st December 2019. The annual Essay Prize seeks to further enhance Oxford Art Journal’s international reputation for publishing innovative scholarship, and can be on any topic relevant to art history. Submissions are encouraged from British and international doctoral students, as well as early career researchers who are within five years of gaining their PhD.

The winner will receive:
• Publication of the winning essay in Oxford Art Journal
• £500 worth of Oxford University Press books
• A year’s free subscription to Oxford Art Journal

Find out more by visiting the journal’s website.

CAA Professional Committees

Posted in opportunities by Editor on September 3, 2019

A note from Julia Sienkewicz; Assistant Professor of Art History, Roanoke College; Vice President for Committees, Board of Directors, CAA

Two New Committees of the College Art Association
Applications due by 1 October 2019

Even as the new school year begins, please consider putting together an application to join one of CAA’s two new professional committees: the Committee on Research and Scholarship and the Services to Historians of Visual Arts Committee. These committees, which were approved by the Board of Directors in May, were formed largely in response to conversations and concerns within the art historical community. We hope the committees will be able to advance substantial good work for our professions. The call for applications can be found here. Because these committees are new, we have assigned a slightly extended deadline of October 1 for these applications. Committee charges are included below.

Should you have questions about the application process, please email Vanessa Jalet (vjalet@collegeart.org). For other inquiries concerning the two new committees, please reach out to me. Of course, I also encourage you to review the other standing Professional Committees. All are accepting applications (until 18 September). Announcing these new committees is an exciting moment for me in my work with CAA’s professional committees. I look forward to working with some of you to get these important new teams up and running!

Sincerely,
Julia Sienkewicz

Committee on Research and Scholarship

The Committee on Research and Scholarship is charged with gathering information, assessing trends, and proposing organizational advocacy for CAA on matters concerning the advancement of research and scholarship in visual arts and design, encompassing all facets of research regarding history, education, and practice. Recognizing that professionals must navigate a rapidly-transforming field of options for conducting research and disseminating the results thereof, the committee is responsible for assisting the organization in engaging with current issues and serving its membership in this important facet of their professional life.

Services to Historians of Visual Arts Committee

The Services to Historians of Visual Arts Committee identifies and addresses concerns facing historians of art, architecture, design, material culture, and visual culture. It creates and implements programs and events at the conference and beyond. It offers a forum for the discussion of issues of mutual interest across the discipline’s many diverse fields and methodologies. In a climate of great threat to the survival of history of art and history of visual arts programs, this committee provides a locus for advocacy issues particular to historians in these areas of interest. The committee lends support and mentorship for both seasoned and emerging professionals. It is also charged with maintaining dialog with other professional organizations and affiliated societies focused on the history of art, architecture, design, material culture, and visual culture.

sKBL International Summer School, 2020: Dutch Country Houses

Posted in opportunities by Editor on July 8, 2019

This new program launches in 2020 with applications accepted between 1 August 2019 and 1 April 2020. From the program flyer:

sKBL International Summer School: Historic Country Houses in the Netherlands
The Netherlands, 3–11 July 2020

Applications due by 1 April 2020

The first edition of the sKBL International Summer School will start in 2020. Many associate England, France, and Germany with beautiful castles and stretched-out rural estates. Within Europe, the Netherlands is not as often associated with this, even though it contains hundreds of special castles, historic country houses, and rural estates. The sKBL International Summer School wants to change this by focusing on this versatile Dutch monumental heritage with knowledgeable participants of various nationalities. The organisation also aspires to create an international network of connoisseurs and professionals, which can be of great use to Dutch castles, country houses, and rural estates.

The 2020 edition, which will be held from 3 to 11 July, is open for participants outside the Netherlands who are conducting professional research on topics that relate to the preservation and conservation of monumental heritage. It is important that we establish interaction between not only the participants, but also the owners of the domains to be visited. This way, knowledge, science, and stories come together, and we can learn and enrich ourselves.

This (pilot) 2020 edition focuses on the historic country houses that have been built in large numbers in the area around Amsterdam in earlier centuries by merchants and aristocrats. This study programme will bring the participants to Amsterdam and to country houses in Kennemerland, the Beemster Polder, ‘s-Graveland, and the Vechtstreek. Dutch experts and researchers will contribute with lectures and guided tours. Future editions may relate to the noble rural estates in Gelderland, the Noordelijke Lustwarande, castles in Limburg, the manors of Overijssel, and so forth. Furthermore, our organisation is searching for cooperation with Belgium, so that their monumental heritage can become part of this curriculum as well.

Practical Points

The language used during the Summer School is English. We aim to attract as many foreign participants as possible, therefore the number of Dutch participants will be limited. In the admission assessment, the Board of Governors will ensure that the composition of the group will be well-balanced. Students are also welcome. The substantive programme also offers opportunities for discussions and reflection. The programme may be changed due to circumstances. The organisation of the Summer School does not (yet) have scholarships.

A minimum of 25 and a maximum of 40 people can participate in the Summer School. You can sign up from 1 August 2019. The application period closes on 1 April 2020. All registered participants will be notified whether or not they have been admitted before 30 April 2020. The participation fee must be paid before 31 May 2020. After 1 June 2020, free cancellation is only possible if a participant on a (possible) waiting list is willing to take a vacant place. The Board of Governors has the decisive vote in this. We do not communicate about admissions and rejections of candidates.

Due to the preparatory stage all costs are not yet fully clear, and the participation fee will be definitively announced on 1 August 2019, but will likely be around € 2,400.- and will comprise supervision, entrance fees, lectures, overnight stays, transport during the programme and most meals. The programme will start with a welcome cocktail and dinner on 3 July 2020 and ends on 11 July 2020 after breakfast.

The Board of Governors regards this 2020 edition as an opportunity to gain experience. In doing so we can change or improve the admission requirements and/or future programmes. After the programme all participants are asked to fill out an evaluation before 30 September 2020.

Admission requirements for the sKBL Summer School 2020:
• Every participant is required to have a demonstrable professional involvement in fields that relate to the preservation or maintenance of castles, historic country houses and rural estates. This may be a scientific or other similarly professional or intellectual engagement. Other relevant (work) experience may also lead to admission. The Board of Governors of the sKBL Summer School will assess the admissions for the 2020 edition.
• All participants are required to submit a curriculum vitae with a motivation letter (in English).
• Every participant must be able to demonstrate that they speak English.
• Every participant must have completed, or must be currently enrolled in, higher professional education, academic education or a similar education. The Board of Governors reserves the right to deviate from this rule.
• Participants must be physically able to join this intensive programme.
• The sKBL Summer School is not in any way responsible for accidents or theft during this programme. We advise every participant to take an individual travel or cancellation insurance.

Applications can be sent to
sKBL International Summer School Board of Governors Attn. Mr. René W.Chr. Dessing
Veerpoortdijk 105
6981 LA DOESBURG
The Netherlands
or by email to rdessing@skbl.nl stating ‘application sKBL Intl. Summer School 2020’

The Digital Piranesi

Posted in fellowships, opportunities, resources by Editor on May 15, 2019

Along with highlighting the project generally, this posting also aims to publicize a related two-year post-doc position (May 31 is the application due date).

The Digital Piranesi is a developing digital humanities project that aims to provide an enhanced digital edition of the works of Italian illustrator Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778). This project aims to make Piranesi’s views, maps, and texts accessible in a complete digital collection and, in an interactive digital edition, to make them visible, legible, and searchable in ways that the original works are not. The scale and breadth of Piranesi’s works require innovative methods of presentation, discovery, and analysis. By digitally illuminating and enacting many of the graphic features of his designs, this project will provide new ways of seeing this rare and complex historical material.

The University of South Carolina is one of fewer than ten institutions to hold a complete set of Piranesi’s posthumous Opere (1837–39), a set of twenty-nine elephant-folio volumes, housed in the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, that assembles all of his individual publications (such as Views of Rome and Imaginary Prisons). Alternatively historical and imaginative, Piranesi’s representations of ruins are exercises in rigorous archeological investigation as much as they are fanciful experiments in urban imagination. The Digital Piranesi aspires to appeal to these two elements of Piranesi’s own works—the historical and the imaginative—and to explore the ways that Piranesi’s works seem to predict many elements of digital design. His illustrations of ruins and crypts are immersive, his architectural studies often consist of multiple layered images, and his maps and ruins include detailed alphabetic keys. His indexed maps, annotated architectural studies, immersive interiors, and multi-image views push the limits of the printed page. While his earliest works were individual engravings of Roman ruins marketed towards visitors on the grand tour, he quickly began producing increasingly larger images and adding not only textual keys but also indices, prefaces, and dissertations. Pushing against the limits not only of the printed page but also of the bound book, his multi-plate engravings become elaborate foldouts in bound volumes, and the references in his maps and indices direct users through unnumbered pages and between different publications. His works are rare—his complete works are exceedingly so—and they constitute a colossal corpus with expansive pedagogical and scholarly potential lacking in any comprehensive searchable index. The Digital Piranesi aims to make the content and connections in this rich body of work easily accessible and searchable.

Piranesi’s architectural views and his referential networks require complex interactions with the spaces of the printed, illustrated book. These ways of interacting with print—tracing cross-references, ‘reading’ an image through its explanatory key—call for specific methods of preservation and display beyond producing digital images. The Digital Piranesi heeds this call by performing the links that Piranesi forges between maps, indices, and images; across unnumbered pages in multiple volumes; and within heavily-annotated engravings. Piranesi’s images are most frequently viewed individually, divorced from their original larger networks of cross-referencing. The digital environment, although it is unable to reproduce the materiality of his original works, offers a way of experiencing Piranesi’s works that is complementary to his vision. Digitally representing not only Piranesi’s images but also their interconnections, composite layers, and verbal references promises to reveal new insights about eighteenth-century Rome, the birth of art history as a discipline, and the graphical representation of knowledge.

With the support of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Division of Preservation and Access for 2019–21, the University of South Carolina is able to hire a postdoctoral fellow, who will contribute to the digital project’s ongoing development and assist in curating an exhibit to commemorate the tricentennial of Piranesi’s birth in the fall of 2020. The application deadline is 31 May 2019. More information is available here.