Enfilade

Chawton House Appeal

Posted in on site, opportunities by Editor on November 10, 2017

From Chawton House Library:

We are launching an urgent, large-scale funding campaign to reimagine and enhance the manor house in Chawton that was as familiar to Jane Austen as her own village home.

We have ambitious plans for Jane Austen’s ‘Great House’ to reach its full potential as a major literary landmark. We want to expand our facilities to secure the house’s survival and provide an enhanced experience of the Chawton estate that was Jane Austen’s home throughout the final, productive years of her life.

We need your help to turn this vision into reality.

hen Jane’s brother Edward inherited the Chawton manor house from childless relatives, he offered a nearby cottage on the estate to his mother and two sisters.

Jane would spend the most productive years of her literary life there. She regularly came and went along the road between her cottage (now Jane Austen’s House Museum) to the Elizabethan property she called the ‘Great House’, where she dined with her family and happily ‘dawdled away’ much of her time.

The ‘Great House’ is now a fast developing visitor attraction complete with Austen family heirlooms, as well as a world-renowned research centre for early women’s writing. In 2018, the foundation that has funded us for many years is focusing its funding on other projects, and we are facing a shortfall of 65% of our income. We know Jane Austen’s ‘Great House’, should be a major historic literary landmark but it does not currently have the facilities to reach its full potential.

We have ambitious plans to create a cultural literary destination within the wider grounds of the ‘Great House’, offering larger and more extensive visitor facilities and providing an enhanced experience of the Chawton estate that was Jane Austen’s home throughout the final, productive years of her life.

The reimagining of Jane’s ‘Great House’ into a more recognised, commercially viable destination will help secure the house, the wider estate, and also our unique collection of early women’s writing and books we know Jane Austen read in her brother’s library. Our treasures include an original manuscript in Jane Austen’s own hand, first and early editions of all of her novels, and also works by important women writers who inspired her, and whom she inspired.

We need your help to turn this vision into reality. Please help see us through to the next chapter by donating to our appeal or by getting involved in our fundraising.

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Survey of Scholarly Reading Practices

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on September 29, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment (formerly, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century) is undertaking our first-ever reader survey, and we are seeking your help to complete the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices.

Published by the Voltaire Foundation at the University of Oxford, the Studies has been publishing scholarly work on the Enlightenment since 1955. This longevity is due in good part to its strong bond with you—our readers, authors and reviewers. As we move forward into our seventh decade, the editorial team seeks to ensure that we continue to publish innovative research on topics at the forefront of the field—and to make this work as widely accessible as possible. Hence we are asking, in this survey, how our community accesses scholarship—both print and digital. The survey requires fewer than 15 minutes to complete and can be taken in either English or French. It opens for responses on Wednesday, September 27, and will remain open until Sunday, October 29.

No identifying information about respondents will be retained outside of the survey responses. All responses will be kept anonymous and confidential. Aggregated findings will be shared with the scholarly community in due course. Further details concerning the survey are available here.

To take the survey, please follow this link: Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices

In recognition of your commitment to Enlightenment values of tolerance and international humanism, the Voltaire Foundation will make charitable contributions to Amnesty International and Médecins Sans Frontières, for each survey completed.

Please address any questions or concerns to Gregory.Brown@voltaire.ox.ac.uk. Thank you for your support of Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment!

Call for Nominations | Eldredge Book Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on September 28, 2017

2018 Charles C. Eldredge Prize
Nominations due by 1 December 2017

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is now accepting nominations for the 2018 Charles C. Eldredge Prize. The prize is given annually by the museum for outstanding scholarship in the field of American art. A cash award of $3,000 is made to the author of a recent book-length publication that provides new insights into works of art, the artists who made them, or aspects of history and theory that enrich our understanding of the artistic heritage of the United States. The Eldredge Prize seeks to recognize originality and thoroughness of research, excellence of writing, clarity of method, and significance for professional or public audiences. It is especially meant to honor those authors who deepen or focus debates in the field, or who broaden the discipline by reaching beyond traditional boundaries.

Single-author books devoted to any aspect of the visual arts of the United States and published in the three previous calendar years (2015–2017) are eligible. To nominate a book, please send a one-page letter explaining the work’s significance to the field of American art history and discussing the quality of the author’s scholarship and methodology. Nominations by authors or publishers for their own books will not be considered. The deadline for nominations is December 1, 2017. Please send them to: The Charles C. Eldredge Prize, Research and Scholars Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum, P.O. Box 37012, MRC 970, Washington, D.C. 20013-7012. Nominations will also be accepted by email: eldredge@si.edu, or fax: (202) 633-8373. Further information about the prize may be found here.

Kress and AAMC Affiliated Fellowship for American Academy in Rome

Posted in opportunities by Editor on September 23, 2017

From the Association of Art Museum Curators:

Kress Foundation and AAMC Foundation Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy in Rome
Applications due by 16 October 2017

The purpose of The Samuel H. Kress Foundation and AAMC Foundation Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy in Rome is to provide essential funding for curators to develop projects that require research in Italy. Awarded projects need not be Rome specific. The program, launched in 2014, is intended to honor exceptional curatorial vision and help curators advance deserving projects.

Since its founding, the program has been awarded to distinguished curators to advance the following projects: Hilliard Todd Goldfarb (Associate Chief Curator and Curator of Old Masters, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts) for Faith, Death, and Eternal Life in the Art of Poussin (working title); Judith Mann (Curator, European Art to 1800 at the Saint Louis Art Museum) for Painting on Stone, 1520–1800; Andaleeb Badiee Banta (Curator of European and American Art, Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College) for Old Master Drawings @ Oberlin: The Italian Drawings; and Jessica Powers (The Gilbert M. Denman, Jr., Curator of Art of the Ancient Mediterranean World, San Antonio Museum of Art) for Sacred Landscapes: Visions of Nature and Myth in Ancient Rome.

“Establishing this Fellowship offers curators the ability to explore further important scholarly research by gaining access to sites and material within Rome.” said Max Marmor, President, of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. “Support for travel research is more and more a rare opportunity for many curators, and we are honored to offer this opportunity, which supports our mission to promote the professional work of curators.

“The AAMC Foundation is truly grateful to have partners, such as the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and American Academy in Rome, that share our organization’s mission, which includes a dedication to the curatorial field,” added former AAMC President (2013–15) Emily Ballew Neff. “We are thrilled to present to our members, through the generous support of the Kress Foundation, such an outstanding and rewarding opportunity to advance their research.”

Eligibility
• Open to AAMC members in good standing.
• Research can be exhibition related or for written scholarly work, but should not be in conjunction with completing a dissertation.
• Applicant is required to list preferred period of residency, indicating a first and second choice.
• A letter of support from institution director, project director and/or host of project.
• Priority will be given to those without funds to support research travel.

Applications are due by Monday, 16 October 2017 at 12pm, EST.

Paul Mellon Centre Publication Grants

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on August 23, 2017

From the PMC:

Paul Mellon Centre Publication Grants
Applications due by 30 September 2017

The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art offers a variety of Fellowships (for individuals) and Grants (for institutions and individuals) twice a year in a strictly timetabled schedule. The programme supports scholarship, academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present, although all supported topics must have an historical perspective.

We do not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. We have no discretionary funds outside our stated programme.

Publication Grants are offered annually. They are awarded to publishers, institutions and/or authors to offset costs incurred in producing works of scholarship in print or in other media. Grants are intended to make possible publications and articles which would otherwise not appear or which would appear in reduced specification.

The Paul Mellon Centre supports scholarly publications concerned with the study of British art and architectural history in both print and online format. Applications will be considered for both long (monographs, catalogues, edited volumes) and short form (articles) texts.

Publisher Costs
A maximum grant of £7,000 is available when applied for by a Publisher to support costs associated with the production of long-form publications in print or digital format. The following costs may be claimed:
• Printing and binding
• Design and layout
• Licensing of images, reproduction and copyright costs
•  Graphics
• Indexing
• Production

Author Costs
A maximum grant of £3,000 is available to support costs incurred by authors for long-form publications, or £1,000 for a short-form publications, in either print or digital format. The following costs may be claimed:
• Licensing of images, reproduction and copyright costs
• Commission of new photography
• Commission of graphics

Joint applications from Authors and Publishers may be considered for a maximum of £10,000 (£7,000 towards production costs and £3,000 towards the reproduction costs incurred by the Author) with the fund being paid in a lump sum to the Publisher.

Alternatively, a Publisher may apply separately for publishing costs of up to £7,000 or an Author may apply separately for costs concerning image reproductions of up to £3,000. Only one grant application can be made per publication.

A smaller amount of up to £1,000 can be applied for by an Author working on an article (in print or online) for image licencing costs.

Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2018. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2017.

Library Research Grants from the Getty

Posted in fellowships, opportunities, resources by Editor on August 12, 2017

From The Getty:

Getty Research Institute Library Research Grants
Applications due by 16 October 2017

Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support for researchers requiring the use of specific collections housed in the Getty Research Institute (GRI). The GRI’s grant budget has been generously supplemented by donations from Getty Research Institute Council members and the Getty Conservation Institute.

Specialized Library Research Grant Opportunities
In addition to the open call for applications relating to projects utilizing any specific area of the GRI’s collections, several focused grants will be awarded in the following areas of study:
• Research related to the modern commercial art market, Los Angeles modern architecture, or design
• Research in the area of 18th-century German art as it relates to the religious, philosophical, and aesthetic contextualization of the Romantic movement
• Research within the GRI’s photo archive, a collection of two million photographs of works of art and architecture providing opportunities for original pictorial research in the fine arts, including the history of photography
• Research that utilizes the Conservation Collection, specialized research materials related to the preservation and conservation of material cultural heritage

Eligibility
Library Research Grants are intended for researchers of all nationalities and at any level who demonstrate a compelling need to use materials housed in the Research Library, and whose place of residence is more than eighty miles from the Getty Center. Projects must relate to specific items in the library collection. (To search the collections, please consult the Research Library’s Search Tools and Databases.)

Terms
Library Research Grants are intended to provide partial support for costs relating to travel, lodging, and living expenses. Housing is not provided. In general, grants are awarded as follows depending upon the distance traveled:
• Within California (must be more than 80 miles away from GRI): $800
• North America, including Canada and Mexico: $1,500
• International outside of North America: $3,000

The research period may range from several days to a maximum of three months. These terms apply as of August 2017 and are subject to future changes. Please see important information about the terms of these grants here.

Notification Process
Applicants are notified of the Research Institute’s decision approximately two months following the deadline. Applicants who do not receive grant awards are still welcome to use the Research Library in accordance with its access policy.

Application Availability and Deadline
Complete application materials are now accepted through an online application process only. The next deadline to submit application materials (including letters of recommendation) for these grants is 5:00pm (PDT) October 16, 2017.

More information is available here»

Academia United on Climate Change

Posted in opportunities by Editor on June 7, 2017

An invitation for members of academic institutions in the United States:

Academia United on Climate Change
Launched 5 June 2017

Global climate change presents a grave threat to humanity and the ecosystems we depend on. Overwhelming scientific evidence indicates that increases in greenhouse gas levels must be reversed in order to avoid catastrophic and irreversible change. The Paris Agreement, signed by 195 nations, represents the only unified global effort to address this challenge. Despite the scientific evidence and popular support for global cooperation, the United States government has indicated that it will withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Therefore, U.S. leadership must come from state and local governments, businesses, and other groups uniting and organizing to meet the greatest challenge of our time. Colleges and universities, tasked with advancing scientific knowledge, developing innovative technologies, and educating leaders of the future, must play a central role. Focused research and education are essential for avoiding climate change, and can transform enormous challenges into innovation, growth, and prosperity. Many institutions are already taking action, but the impact of our efforts will be much greater if we are united.

We, the undersigned faculty, students, and staff of U.S. colleges and universities, urge the leaders of our institutions to develop a unified, national academic climate initiative that includes:

1)  working with states, cities, and businesses to lead the U.S. effort to fight climate change;

2)  agreeing on local measures for our campuses that reflect Paris Agreement guidelines;

3)  coordinating and strengthening science, technology, and education on climate change;

4)  informing the public about climate change science, impacts, and potential solutions.

Master Class | Graphic Satire and Anglo-American History Painting

Posted in opportunities by Editor on April 20, 2017

From The Lewis Walpole Library:

Master Class: A Contest of Two Genres: Graphic Satire and
Anglo-American History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT, 15–18 May 2017

Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa
Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

William Hogarth, The Battle of the Pictures, 1745 (Farmington: The Lewis Walpole Library, lwlpr22633).

Centuries-old hierarchies of the visual arts have placed history painting and graphic satire at opposite ends of the spectrum. ‘History painting’—high-minded narrative art depicting exemplary heroes and events—carried enormous prestige, bringing fame to the individual artist as well as to the national school. In contrast, graphic satire was viewed as the lowest form of visual expression—more closely connected to political prints than to high-minded ‘histories’.

This residential seminar is intended to give doctoral students in a variety of disciplines the opportunity to consider issues and overlaps between these two narrative genres. Making use of visual material and textual resources from the collections of the Lewis Walpole Library’s at Yale, we will examine the often-embattled efforts of artists to construct new modes of visual representation as well as of narrative and history. Through a multidisciplinary approach, we  will take note of a variety of key issues, including the theoretical context of Enlightenment intellectual history, the more focused discourse of art treatises, and direct encounters with the formal and aesthetic qualities of works of art. Among history painters we will give our attention to the works of William Hogarth, Gavin Hamilton, Benjamin West, and John Trumbull, while among the satirists we will focus on James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, and Isaac and George Cruikshank.

The class will be taught as a combination of seminars, small group discussions, and visits to the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Most of the teaching will take place in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington. For more information about this class and to apply, please visit our Master Class page.

Postdoctoral Research Assistant: Enlightenment Architectures

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 7, 2017

From the position description:

Postdoctoral Research Assistant: Enlightenment Architectures
The British Museum, London, 28 months, starting May 2017

Applications due by 13 March 2017

An exciting opportunity has arisen at the British Museum for a Postdoctoral Research Assistant to contribute to the Leverhulme Trust funded research project Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s catalogues of his collections under the Principal Investigator, Kim Sloan and Co-Investigator Julianne Nyhan (UCL).

Beginning ideally in May 2017, as part of this project, the post-holder will work alongside another Postdoctoral Research Assistant on the process of digitally encoding externally sourced transcriptions of six of Sir Hans Sloane’s manuscript catalogues and will assist with identifying information entities within them which will inform research. You will also participate in the production of the project’s peer-reviewed research publications, planned to be a minimum of four co-authored interdisciplinary articles which will be published by the end of the project.

The successful candidate will have completed a PhD, or equivalent, and will be proficient in Latin and/or at least one modern language related to the project. With experience of research/teaching/curatorial work, you will have strong knowledge of electronic text, particularly digital cultural heritage resources for the 17th and 18th centuries.

More information is available here»

Rare Book School Offerings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 2, 2017

Rare Book School offers five-day, intensive courses in several locations focused on the history of manuscript, print, and digital materials. Our courses this spring and summer will be held at the University of Virginia, Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Indiana University, Bloomington.

Among our more than thirty courses on the history of books and printing, we are pleased to offer courses of interest to those in the fields of art history and eighteenth-century studies. The following is a sample of the breadth of classes offered:
• I-10 The History of Printed Book Illustration in the West, taught by Erin C. Blake (Folger Shakespeare Library)
• H-100 The Eighteenth-Century Book, taught by Mark Dimunation (Library of Congress) and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. (University of Virginia & Rare Book School)
• H-30 The Printed Book in the West to 1800, taught by Martin Antonetti (Northwestern University)

Applications are now open on a rolling admissions basis. Visit our website for course details.

A 2016 RBS student remarked, “I will never look at a book—any book—the same way again,” and so we hope you will join us at an RBS course this year and learn to see books in a new way as well!

With kindest regards,
The RBS Programs Team