Enfilade

Two New HECAA Positions, Now Open

Posted in Member News, opportunities, site information by Editor on April 18, 2019

At this year’s annual HECAA business meeting, held in Denver on 22 March 2019, the membership discussed and gave general approval to the creation of a HECAA website and social media presence. The executive board is now eager to receive applications for these two positions. Although Enfilade was originally conceived as a ‘newsletter’ for HECAA, it was apparent within weeks of the site’s launch in 2009 that the readership would be much broader than the organization’s membership and thus the site has always had a somewhat peculiar relationship to the organization. As described in the recently updated constitution & bylaws, Enfilade will continue to be affiliated with HECAA—much like Journal18—but now seems to be a good time for developing distinct web and social media presences. These promising initiatives have my full support, and I look forward to what emerges. And no worries: I’ve no plans to discontinue Enfilade any time soon! The familiar format of a decade-old blog will scroll into the future as well. Craig Hanson

HECAA Website Designer

$2500–$3000 for an estimated 60–80 hour project,
using Wix, Weebly, or WordPress

Desired Features
• home page + interior pages, some with password-protected access for members only
• ability to add special events page (for future conferences, etc)
• portal page should be mobile-responsive
• integrated donation/payment system, with PayPal or similar to facilitate membership renewals, donations, other payments
• event calendar
• social photo gallery, integrated with social media posts

Qualifications
• a demonstrated competency with web design and familiarity with at least one of the possible software platforms
• a vision for the look and feel of HECAA’s web presence
• strong visual/writing skills
• an ability to work independently and to teach yourself/acquire new technical skills as needed

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and examples of past work in web design or content creation to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 15 May 2019.

HECAA Social Media Manager

$1500 stipend for one year, 1 July 2019 — 30 June 2020
about 10 hours/week expected

Establish and maintain two social media accounts on behalf of HECAA (Instagram + either Twitter or a Facebook Group). Create HECAA’s social media tone and look. Support website maintenance, once the HECAA website is completed.

Expectations
• make/oversee/coordinate at least one social media post per week, more during times of peak HECAA activity
• generate content for posts
• use accounts to highlight the work of HECAA members, build community, and increase visibility of eighteenth-century art history
• using Instagram as the chief platform, create content that is both aesthetically pleasing and informational
• may coordinate different HECAA members for temporary account takeovers
• coordinate with Enfilade and Journal18 to mutually enhance each other’s social media presence
• keep website up to date and in sync with social media and Enfilade: update calendar, sync photo gallery with social posts, etc.

Qualifications
• familiarity with Instagram plus either Facebook or Twitter
• a vision for HECAA’s social media identity and presence
• good people/ networking skills
• good research skills (for content generation purposes)
• strong visual/writing skills

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and two sample posts (geared to a platform of your choice) to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 1 June 2019.

Call for Manuscripts | Brill Series, History of Collecting & Art Market

Posted in books, opportunities by Editor on March 27, 2019

History of Collecting & Art Market
Brill Book Series, Edited by Christian Huemer

Brill‘s ‘Studies in the History of Collecting & Art Markets’ is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to original scholarship on the social, cultural, and economic mechanisms underlying the circulation of art. Over the last two decades interest in the formation, display, and dissolution of art collections increased tremendously; art markets, trade routes, and dealer networks became a rich field of interdisciplinary inquiry. Scholarship brought forth a lot of information about the flamboyant personalities to whom the possession of art was a lifestyle; regarding the ‘social life of things’, i.e. the provenance of individual artworks, many research gaps could be closed.

This shift in scholarly attention from the production side to the consumption side of the art world is also reflected in the emergence of specialized post-graduate courses offered by a number of institutions internationally, as well as an ever-increasing stream of exhibitions, conferences, and publications devoted to the subject. Brill‘s book series accommodates scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference that engage in the broadly defined topic of art markets and collecting practices throughout history.

We invite scholars to submit their English language manuscript proposal for the book series to Liesbeth Hugenholtz, acquisitions editor at Brill (hugenholtz@brill.com) or to the series editor Christian Huemer (C.Huemer@belvedere.at).

Editor-in-Chief
Christian Huemer (Belvedere Research Center, Vienna)

Editorial Board
Malcolm Baker (University of California, Riverside), Ursula Frohne (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster), Daniela Gallo (Université de Lorraine, Nancy), Hans van Miegroet (Duke University, Durham), Inge Reist (The Frick Collection, New York – retired),  Adriana Turpin (Institut d’Etudes Supérieures des Arts, London), Filip Vermeylen (Erasmus University, Rotterdam)

More information about the series is available here»

caa.reviews Seeks Editors, 2019–22

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 20, 2019

Worth noting that the Field Editor for Eighteenth-Century Art is one of the open positions; from CAA News:

caa.reviews Seeks Editor-in-Chief
Applications due by 1 April 2019

The caa.reviews Editorial Board invites nominations and self-nominations for the position of Editor-in-Chief for a three-year term, July 1, 2020–June 30, 2023. This term is preceded by one year of service on the editorial board as editor designate, July 1, 2019–June 30, 2020, and followed immediately by one year of service as past editor. Candidates should have published substantially in the field and may be academic, museum-based, or independent scholars; institutional affiliation is not required. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of new books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to the fields of art history, visual studies, and the arts.

Working with the editorial board, the editor-in-chief is responsible for the content and character of the journal. The editor-in-chief supervises the caa.reviews Council of Field Editors, assisting them in identifying and soliciting reviewers, articles, and other content for the journal; develops projects; and makes final decisions regarding content.

The editor-in-chief attends the caa.reviews Editorial Board’s three meetings each year—held in New York in May and October and once at the Annual Conference in February—and submits an annual report to CAA’s Board of Directors. CAA reimburses the editor-in-chief for travel and lodging expenses for the two New York meetings in accordance with its travel policy, but the person in this position pays these expenses to attend the conference. The editor-in-chief also works closely with the CAA staff in New York and receives an annual honorarium paid quarterly.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, at least one letter of recommendation, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editor-in-Chief Search, CAA, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY, 10004; or email the documents to Publications and Programs Editor Joan Strasbaugh, jstrasbaugh@collegeart.orgDeadline: April 1, 2019; finalists will be interviewed in early May.

caa.reviews Seeks Four Field Editors
Application due by 15 April 2019

In addition, CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for four individuals to join the caa.reviews Council of Field Editors for a three-year term July 1, 2019–June 30, 2022. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of new books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to art history, visual studies, and the arts.

The journal seeks four field editors in the following areas:

  • Design History
  • Eighteenth-Century Art
  • Architecture and Urbanism
  • Theory and Historiography

Working with the caa.reviews editor-in-chief, the caa.reviews Editorial Board, and CAA’s staff editor, each field editor selects content to be reviewed, commissions reviewers, and considers manuscripts for publication. Field editors for books are expected to keep abreast of newly published and important books and related media in their fields of expertise, and those for exhibitions should be aware of current and upcoming exhibitions (and other related projects) in their geographic regions.

The Council of Field Editors meets yearly at the CAA Annual Conference. Field editors must pay travel and lodging expenses to attend the conference. Members of all CAA committees and editorial boards volunteer their services without compensation.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a cover letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editorial Board, CAA, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents to staff editor Joan Strasbaugh, jstrasbaugh@collegeart.orgDeadline: April 15, 2019.

2019 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 15, 2019

From the prize announcement:

2019 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History
Awarded by The Colonial Society of Massachusetts

Essays due by 15 January 2020

This prize of $2500, established in memory of Walter Muir Whitehill, for many years Editor of Publications for the Colonial Society and the moving force behind the organization, will be awarded for a distinguished essay on early American history (up to 1825), not previously published. The Society hopes that the prize may be awarded annually.

A committee of eminent historians will review the essays. Their decision in all cases will be final. By arrangement with the editors of The New England Quarterly, the Society will have the winning essay published in an appropriate issue of the journal.

Essays are now being accepted for consideration. All manuscripts submitted for the 2019 prize must be postmarked no later than January 15, 2020. The Society expects to announce the winning candidate in the spring of 2020.

Entries submitted for consideration should be addressed to:

Whitehill Prize Committee
c/o The New England Quarterly
Department of History
University of Massachusetts, Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, MA 02125

Additional information, including prize specifications and a list of past winners, is available here»

Art Markets: An Integrated Perspective

Posted in opportunities by Editor on February 9, 2019

From the program’s website:

Art Markets: An Integrated Perspective
International Thematic School
Lyon, 24–28 June 2019

Registration due by 15 March 2019

The thematic school is organized by the LARHRA and the Université Lumière Lyon 2 in collaboration with the Université Libre de Bruxelles and Erasmus University, Rotterdam. It aims to provide the research community interested in the study of art markets with an interdisciplinary theoretical approach and methodological tools in line with the most up-to-date analytical methods in order to bring out new research perspectives. About fifteen international specialists in art history, economics, law, sociology, finance, and digital humanities from all over Europe and the United States will animate it in a spirit of exchange and sharing of knowledge.

The art market is essentially a multidisciplinary object of study. While it is now a significant sector of the global economy, it has always it played a seminal role in the circulation and reception of art, and provided the context within which artists created their work. Researchers from disciplines as diverse as economics, finance, law, history, art history or sociology have contributed to a better understanding of the complexity and specificity of this market. Despite the advances made in each of these fields, research on the art market still too often suffers from a compartmentalization by disciplinary field.

The Art Markets thematic school aims to bring together the international community of researchers working on the art market and to offer participants the opportunity to better understand the scientific approaches of other disciplines. Sharing a common knowledge base and concepts is a necessary condition for developing transdisciplinary collaborations. To this end, this training offers an interdisciplinary theoretical approach and methodological tools in line with the most up-to-date analytical methods. The articulation between historical and contemporary analyses from the point of view of economics, finance, sociology, and law is particularly innovative.

Indeed, in the era of globalization and digital technology, art markets are undergoing profound changes that are leading to a reconfiguration of the modalities of interaction between actors and intermediaries. Issues related to artistic exchanges, the emergence or decline of markets, financial speculation, the concentration of actors and the role of agents in building the economic and social value of art, have accelerated the need to use robust analytical techniques to better understand these issues. But are they so new? These phenomena benefit from being re-examined in the light of their historical contexts in order to understand their logic and dynamics over time. At the same time, the analysis of contemporary art markets allows us to shed light with the advantage of hindsight on the practices, mechanisms and strategies put in place since the emergence of markets for visual arts and the first globalization from the 16th century onwards. In addition, quantitative analytical methods, data modelling and visualization have paved the way for important methodological and epistemological explorations

The training is aimed at the entire scientific community: professors-researchers, researchers, post-doctoral fellows, doctoral students, staff of research support (ITA). It should also be of interest for experts and professionals active in the art market. It is open to all participants from Master 2 level onwards, preferably in a discipline related to the study of art markets: economic history, art history, economics, finance, sociology, and law.

Contact: artmarkets2019@sciencesconf.org

This thematic school has received support from the CNRS, IDEX Lyon, Université Lumière Lyon 2, LARHRA, College académique Sciences Sociales de l’Université de Lyon.

Seminar | Matthew Hargraves on Watercolor

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 31, 2019

J. M. W. Turner, The Pass at St. Gotthard, near Faido, 1843, watercolor over graphite
(New York: The Morgan Library & Museum, 2006.52)

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From the seminar flyer:

Seminar on Watercolor with Matthew Hargraves
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, 15 March 2019

Applications due by 1 February 2019

The Morgan Library & Museum has an extensive collection of drawings from the Renaissance to the present, many of which feature the use of colored washes. Participants in this graduate seminar will look closely at the use of watercolor by artists of different schools, with a particular focus on the widespread use of the medium during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Britain. From around 1750 to 1850, the period typically considered to be watercolor’s ‘golden age’, the medium came to be seen as a distinctively British art. In fact, however, watercolor had been used across Europe for centuries, and this seminar will examine the origins of watercolor, its adoption and development by British artists in the eighteenth century, and the spread of watercolor as a drawing medium in the Romanic period. Among the sheets examined will be examples by Albrecht Dürer, William Blake, Caspar David Friedrich, Eugène Delacroix, and J.M.W. Turner. The seminar will begin at 10am and last until 4pm.

Matthew Hargraves is Chief Curator of Art Collections at Yale Center for British Art in New Haven.

This seminar is open to graduate students in the history of art. Interested participants are kindly
invited to submit a one paragraph statement, which should include the following:
• Name and email
• Academic institution, class year, and field of study
• Interest in drawings
• Reason/s for wanting to participate in the seminar

A brief recommendation from the student’s advisor is welcome but not required. Applications should be submitted electronically by 1 February 2019 with the subject header ‘Watercolor Seminar’ to: drawinginstitute@themorgan.org. Participants will be notified by 11 February 2019.

Early Career Fellowships | Göttingen Institute for Advanced Study

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on December 7, 2018

Early Career Fellowships
The Lichtenberg-Kolleg, the Göttingen Institute for Advanced Study, October 2019 — July 2021

Opening its doors in 1737 Göttingen quickly established itself as one of Europe’s leading Enlightenment universities. Named after one of the most important and versatile representatives of the Göttingen Enlightenment, the Lichtenberg-Kolleg is an interdisciplinary research institute with a strong focus not only on religion in the modern world, the Enlightenment(s) as well as the history of political thought/intellectual history but also on ‘bridges’ between the human and natural sciences. For the period October 2019 to July 2021 we are inviting early career scholars to join one of the following research groups:
• Globalising the Enlightenment: Knowledge, Culture, Travel, Exchange and Collections
• Human Rights, Constitutional Politics and Religious Diversity
• European Intellectual History / History of Political Thought
• Moritz Stern Fellowships in Modern Jewish Studies: Cultural, Intellectual and Literary History (in cooperation with the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

Please find more information here.

Call for Essays | Terra Foundation for American Art Essay Prize

Posted in Calls for Papers, opportunities by Editor on November 12, 2018

Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize
Submissions due by 15 January 2019

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize recognizes excellent scholarship by a non-U.S. citizen working in the field of historical American art. Manuscripts should advance the understanding of American art by demonstrating new findings and original perspectives. The prize winner will be given the opportunity to work toward publication in American Art, the peer-reviewed journal copublished by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the University of Chicago Press. The winner will receive a $1,000 cash award and a travel stipend of up to $3,500 to give a presentation in Washington, D.C., and meet with museum staff and research fellows.

Authors must be non-U.S. citizens who have achieved doctoral candidacy or completed a doctoral degree (or the equivalent), and have not previously had a manuscript accepted for publication in American Art. Essays may focus on any aspect of historical (pre-1980) American art and visual culture; however, architecture and film studies are not eligible. Essays may be submitted in any language; abstracts must be submitted in English.

Submissions for the 2019 prize must be sent to TerraEssayPrize@si.edu by January 15, 2019. For information on the prize, available in Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish, please consult AmericanArt.si.edu/research/awards/terra.

Publication Grant, Historians of British Art

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 10, 2018

HBA Publication Grant
Applications due by 15 January 2019

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA who can demonstrate that the HBA subvention will replace their out of pocket costs. Applications are not accepted from institutions. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2019.

Attingham Offerings for 2019

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 28, 2018

Giovanni Paolo Panini, Modern Rome, 1757, 68 × 92 inches
(New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 52.63.2)

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Next year’s Attingham offerings:

The 68th Attingham Summer School, 4–21 July 2019
Applications due by 29 January 2019

The 68th Attingham Summer School, an 18-day residential course directed by David Adshead and Tessa Wild, will visit country houses in Sussex, Oxfordshire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, and Cambridgeshire.

Royal Collection Studies, 1–10 September 2019
Applications due by 12 February 2019

Based near Windsor, the course provides an overview of the patronage and collecting of the Kings and Queens of England/United Kingdom, from the 15th century onwards. Teaching includes lectures and tutorials, as well as visits to both the occupied and unoccupied palaces in and around London. The course is organised on broadly chronological principles, developing an understanding of the changing function and character of the British Royal Collection through a study of the monarchs responsible for its creation and the objects collected. Group discussion and exchange is an important part of the course, and content includes architecture and interiors, decorative arts, paintings, sculpture, and works on paper. The course is held when the Royal Family is not in residence and Windsor Castle is the central focus. Several visits are made before or after opening hours. Regular visits are also made to other palaces and there are several object-focused study sessions.

The Attingham Study Programme: Palaces and Villas of Rome and Naples, 16–24 September 2019
Applications due by 12 February 2019

Conceived from the perspective of the British, European, and American travellers who visited Italy to experience antique, renaissance and baroque Rome during the period c.1650–1950, this intensive study programme will begin with a visit to the British School at Rome. This is a fine example of the work of Edwin Lutyens, built in 1911 in the Valle Giulia, Rome’s ‘Valley of the Academies’ and now a centre for research in archaeology, the arts and the humanities. The programme will consider palaces and villas with their collections in the light of papal patronage and focus upon some of the key Roman families and their influence upon their contemporaries. The choice of properties encompasses those that inspired travellers to collect sculpture, books, paintings, and works of art, their taste informed by the desire to furnish and sometimes rebuild their town and country houses back home.

The London House Course, 1–7 October 2019
Applications due by 19 February 2019

The 7-day London House course, directed by David Adshead, studies the development of the London house from the Renaissance to the present. It combines numerous visits to houses, many of them private, with a series of lectures by leading authorities. Progressing chronologically and exploring all over London, the course takes members inside grand aristocratic buildings, smaller domestic houses, artists’ studios and the garden suburb.