Enfilade

Summer Course | From Print to Paint

Posted in opportunities by Editor on February 23, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

From Print to Paint: Histories and Methods of Artistic Production
Utrecht, 13–17 July 2020

Applications due by 1 April 2020

How do artists master their art? Does painting in oil result in different working procedures and visual effects compared to other media? Which material and technical properties determine the creative possibilities of prints, sculptures, and the applied arts? What can art historians learn from re-making art, re-working historical recipes, or reproducing material objects? This course will immerse you in discussions related to art production and (re-)making, materials and materiality, and techniques and technology.

This course is highly interactive and has a firm hands-on component. It integrates methods typical for the humanities and historical disciplines with practical work in the studio or lab. At one moment you may find yourself decoding a recipe for writing ink in a historical manuscript; at another moment you might be introduced to the practicalities of the printing press. During one lab session you might be mixing pigment with different binding media to make oil and tempera paint, and on the next day you might be working with fire to cast a small metal object. You will benefit from Utrecht University’s Kunstlab and the research and expertise of the ERC-funded research project ARTECHNE. Upon completion, you will have deepened your knowledge in the artistic production of art with insights from recent developments in technical art history and heritage studies. This is the one-week version of the course. You can also choose to participate in the extended version (two weeks) that includes visits to museums throughout the Netherlands.

Lecturers
Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen (main lecturer), Sven Dupré (guest speaker), Mireille Cornelis (guest speaker)

Target audience
Students who wish to take this course should have some academic training, as there will be substantial readings and intensive discussions. This course is also suitable for MA and PhD students who wish to apply historical remaking as a methodology and learn practical skills, as no previous experience in artistic production and making is required.

Course fee for the one-week version
€650 (included: course + course materials)
Housing fee: €200

Course fee for the extended version
€1150 (included: course + course materials + travel costs and entry fees to site visits)
Housing fee: €350

Housing through Utrecht Summer School. Summer school housing is optional. Students can also choose to arrange their own accommodation.

How to apply?
Please include a brief motivation to introduce who you are and why you want to take this course. This is to help the instructors learn the level of experience to better plan the lab sessions. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. As there is limited space in the lab, interested participants are advised to apply as soon as possible.

More information
Please contact the Course Director and ARTECHNE Project Associate Jessie Wei-Hsuan Chen at w.h.chen@uu.nl.

Antwerp Summer School in Digital Humanities, 2020

Posted in opportunities by Editor on February 2, 2020

From the University of Antwerp:

Antwerp Summer School in Digital Humanities: Making a Digital Edition, Basic Skills and Technologies
University of Antwerp, 29 June — 3 July 2020

Applications due by 16 March (early bird) or 6 April 2020

From 29 June to 3 July 2020, the University of Antwerp’s Centre for Digital humanities and literary Criticism (ACDC) is organising its third annual Summer School in Digital Humanities. The summer school will exist of an intensive 5-day entry level hands-on course on making digital scholarly editions. Over the course of the week, participants will gradually learn how to transcribe and describe textual cultural heritage documents in TEI-compliant XML, process their transcriptions using related X-technologies (Xpath and XSLT), and prepare them for the web. Specifically, participants will set up a Local Area Network of Raspberry Pi minicomputers to develop an eXist-db XML database for hosting and sharing their materials in the form of a digital scholarly edition.

As students will be introduced to these technologies step by step, the course requires no prior skills or knowledge – other than to complete a minor autodidactic exercise to make sure everyone has a basic understanding of some of the core technologies the course will build on (HTML, CSS, Command Line).

The organizers are happy to announce that the summer school’s keynote lecture will be presented by Dr. Elena Pierazzo, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Tours, at the Centre d’Études Superieures de la Renaissance where she directs the MA program in Digital Humanities and approaches to the digitisation of cultural heritage materials (Intelligence des Patronises). Professor Pierazzo has been the Chair of the Text Encoding Initiative for two mandates, and has served for two mandates in the TEI Technical Council and was involved in the TEI user-community, with a special interest in the transcription, edition and cataloguing of modern and medieval manuscripts. She was co-chairs the working group on digital editions of the European Network NeDiMAH and one of the scientist in chief for DiXiT  a Marie Curie ITN devoted to the training of doctoral students to the practice of digital scholarly editing. And in 2019, she was invited by the ADHO (Alliance of the Digital Humanities Organisation) as the co-Chair of the Program Committee of the DH2019 in Utrecht. Although this lecture is part of the summer school’s official programme, the keynote will be organised in the context of the University of Antwerp’s platform{DH} Lecture Series, and opened up to the larger public.

Registration for the summer starts from €150 (early bird) and closes on Monday 6 April (regular). For more information on the application procedure, please visit our registration page.

As a training event, the summer school is organised in conjunction with CLARIAH-VL – a collaborative infrastructure project across Flemish universities to which ACDC and the platform{DH} are affiliated. We look forward to welcoming you in Antwerp this summer!

Seminar | How to Write Articles for Publication

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 28, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

How to Write Articles for Publication
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, 22 April 2020

Applications due by 2 March 2020

Join the editorial board of Master Drawings journal to learn strategies for translating your research into an article. A series of presentations will be followed by an interactive session in which participants will be divided into smaller groups to work closely with one of the journal’s editors. The seminar is open to 20 recent Ph.D. recipients and advanced graduate students in the history of art whose work focuses on drawings. The course takes place at The Morgan Library & Museum on Wednesday, April 22nd. The application deadline is March 2nd and should be submitted electronically with the subject header ‘Writing Seminar’ to administrator@masterdrawings.org. Participants will be notified by 1 April 2020. More information, as well as the online application form is available here. The seminar is made possible through the generous support of Baymeath Art Trust.

Attingham Offerings for 2020

Posted in opportunities by Editor on December 21, 2019

Francis Wheatley, The Earl of Aldborough Reviewing Volunteers at Belan House, County Kildare, 1782 (later changes ca.1787 and extended ca.1810), oil on canvas, 155 × 265 cm (National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, bequeathed by James de Rothschild, 1957).

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Next year’s Attingham offerings:

The Attingham Study Programme: The Historic House in Ireland, 3–11 June 2020
Applications due by 27 January 2020

This intensive nine-day study programme will examine the Irish country house and its wider estate, in the context of its changing ownership and presentation. Some visits will focus on houses with original decorative schemes and collections, allowing members to study the unique features of Irish design, while others will look at houses as the setting for outdoor and leisure pursuits.

The programme’s first base will be the Centre for the Study of Historic Irish Houses and Estates at the University of Maynooth, from where it is planned to visit Carton House and Castletown House, both significant Palladian villas, whose interior decoration was conceived by the Lennox sisters; the latter complemented by a series of rare estate buildings and monuments. We will also explore the Casino at Marino, Newbridge House, and Leixlip Castle, Co. Kildare, bought by the Hon. Desmond Guinness in 1958, and from where the Irish Georgian Society was founded.

The course will travel south to Cork through Waterford via Monksgrange House in Co. Wexford, where Irish Arts and Crafts furniture was made in the 1920s and which has a delightful ‘Lutyenesque’ garden. There will also be a short visit to the Dunbrody Famine Ship at New Ross which carried thousands of emigrants to North America in the 1840s. From Cork the Neo-Classical interiors at Fota House will be explored, as well as the romantic waterside retreat of Bantry House on the south-west coast. We also plan to visit Curraghmore, home of the Marquess of Waterford, whose ancestors arrived in 1170, and Lismore Castle, the seat of the Devonshires in Ireland.

The study programme will be directed by Elizabeth Jamieson and will include visits to other privately-owned houses as well those listed. It will be supported by a series of lectures and seminars delivered by expert speakers. The course will start and finish in the historic city of Dublin.

69th Attingham Summer School, 2–19 July 2020
Applications due by 27 January 2020

The 69th Attingham Summer School, an 18-day residential course directed by David Adshead and Tessa Wild, will visit country houses in Sussex, Oxfordshire, Derbyshire, Northamptonshire, and Norfolk. From West Dean, our first base, we will study, among other houses and gardens: the complex overlays of Arundel Castle, the ancestral seat of the Dukes of Norfolk; Petworth House, where the patronage of great British artists such as Turner and Flaxman enrich its Baroque interiors; Uppark, a Grand Tour house; Standen, an Arts and Crafts reinterpretation of the country house.

In the Midlands a series of related houses will be examined: Hardwick Hall, unique among Elizabethan houses for its survival of late 16th-century decoration and contents; Bolsover Castle, a Jacobean masque setting frozen in stone; and Chatsworth, where the collections and gardens of the Dukes of Devonshire span more than four centuries. Other highlights include the superb collections and landscaped gardens at Boughton House, ‘the English Versailles’; Calke Abbey, with its left ‘as found’ interiors; and the crisp neo-Classical Kedleston Hall.

Based in Norwich, the final part of the course will explore the estates and collections of Norfolk, a coastal county of rich contrasts and exceptional houses.  Our itinerary will include Blickling, the fine Jacobean house of Sir Henry Hobart and later of the Earls of Buckingham, renowned for its Long Gallery and superb book collection; Felbrigg Hall, a 17th-century house with important Grand Tour collections and mid 18th-century interiors by James Paine; Houghton Hall, the great Palladian country seat of Sir Robert Walpole the first ‘Prime Minister’, with its unrivaled work by William Kent; and Sheringham Park, a favorite work of Humphry Repton, for which he produced one of his famous Red Books. 

Throughout the course, lectures, seminars, and discussions will be held on all aspects of the country house including conservation and restoration, display and interpretation. Several private houses and collections will also be visited.

Royal Collection Studies, 6–15 September 2020
Applications due by 7 February 2020

Directed by Rebecca Lyons and run on behalf of Royal Collection Trust, this strenuous 10-day course is based near Windsor and will visit royal palaces in and around London with specialist tutors (many from the Royal Collection Trust) and study the patronage and collecting of the Royal Family.

From College Library to Country House, 14–18 September 2020
Applications due by 12 February 2020

From College Library to Country House is conceived from the perspective of the British aristocracy and gentry whose education centered upon preparing to run the country estate, including house and collections, and will argue for the importance of the library and the book collection in this process. This intensive residential course is based in the exceptional surroundings of Clare College in the center of the University of Cambridge. Directed by Andrew Moore, the programme focuses upon a series of iconic libraries including those at Houghton Hall and Holkham Hall.

French Eighteenth-Century Studies at the Wallace Collection, 5–9 October 2020
Applications due by 25 February 2020

Directed by Helen Jacobsen, this 5-day non-residential program aims to foster a deeper knowledge and understanding of French 18th-century fine and decorative art. Based at the Wallace Collection with one full study day at Waddesdon Manor this course is intended primarily to aid professional development with object-based study.

ASECS 2020, Saint Louis Art Museum Workshop

Posted in conferences (to attend), on site, opportunities by Editor on December 16, 2019

John Greenwood, Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam, ca.1752–58, oil on bed ticking, 38 × 75 inches
(Saint Louis Art Museum)

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In conjunction with the 2020 meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies in St. Louis, 19–21 March, Amy Torbert and Brittany Luberda are organizing a pre-conference workshop at the Saint Louis Art Museum. A draft program for the conference is now available from ASECS, and I’ll post sessions of particular relevance for art historians here after the new year. Conference registration details are also now available. CH

Introduction to Saint Louis Art Museum Eighteenth-Century Collections
Wednesday, 18 March 2020, 1:00–5:00pm

Applications due by 31 December 2019

The pre-conference workshop will consist of dialogues among curators, field experts, and attendees on topics including global encounter, intermateriality, politics of empire, social histories, production processes, and curating the eighteenth century. These conversations will be held in the galleries in front of highlights such as colonial silver, European porcelain, Chinese bronzes and exportware, Peruvian textiles, and paintings including John Greenwood’s Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam (ca.1752–58) and François-André Vincent’s Arria and Paetus (1784). The event will include the opportunity to study works from storage rarely on view and to visit the Print Study Room.

Scholars and curators of all disciplines are invited to register. As numbers are limited due to spatial constraints, please apply by sending a brief email describing your interest, along with any questions you may have, to eighteenthcenturyatslam@gmail.com by 31 December 2019. Confirmed participants will be contacted by the workshop organizers, Amy Torbert (Saint Louis Art Museum) and Brittany Luberda (Baltimore Museum of Art), by 20 January 2020.

The workshop will be held at the Museum on Wednesday, 18 March 2020, from 1:00–5:00pm. Participants must arrange their own transportation. The Museum is a 30-minute drive from the airport and a 20-minute drive from the hotel. Contact information will be provided to the participants to facilitate sharing of Uber, Lyft or other transportation.

Call for Applications | Masterclass on Wax-Resin Linings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 22, 2019

From the programme flyer:

Conserving Canvas Initiative — The Dutch Method Unfolded: Masterclass on Wax-Resin Linings
University of Amsterdam, 29 June — 10 July 2020

Applications due by 14 December 2019

The Department of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) is pleased to announce The Dutch Method Unfolded, a masterclass on wax-resin linings to be held at the UvA from 29 June to 10 July 2020. The two-week program is supported by the Getty Foundation as part of its Conserving Canvas initiative.

The goal of the masterclass is to disseminate knowledge on the history of wax-resin linings, a remedial conservation method invented in the Netherlands in the first half of the 19th century and extensively used by paintings conservators in Europe and abroad until the 1970s. The masterclass will also inform on the impact of wax-resin linings on the physical and material characteristics of paintings. Furthermore, it will provide a platform to share expertise and reflect on the consequences of the method for today’s conservation of lined paintings.

The masterclass is a joint initiative of the University of Amsterdam with the following Dutch museums: Frans Hals Museum, Amsterdam Museum, Mauritshuis, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, and Van Gogh Museum, in collaboration with the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE) and the Stichting Restauratie Atelier Limburg (SRAL).
The masterclass is offered to a group of maximum 14 mid-career professionals in conservation including conservators of cultural heritage, art historians, curators, collection manager, and conservation scientists. The participants of the masterclass will receive funding for travel and accommodation.

The participants of the masterclass will be selected via an open call which closing date is 14 December 2019. Further information regarding registration and the program, is available here. For inquiries, please contact the program organization at wax-resin-fgw@uva.nl. Further information on the Getty’s initiative can be found here.

Call for Submissions | Percy G. Adams Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on November 4, 2019

From SEASACS:

Percy G. Adams Prize, SEASECS
Submissions due by 30 November 2019

The Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) awards a biennial prize of $500 for the best article on an eighteenth-century subject published in a scholarly journal, annual, or collection. Eligible publications for this year must have been published between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019. Authors must be members of SEASECS at the time of submission. Articles may be submitted by the author or by another member. The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2019. Please send submissions as PDF files, and address any queries about the prize to the Committee Chair, Amanda Strasik, at Amanda.Strasik@eku.edu.

Master Drawings, Ricciardi Prize

Posted in opportunities by Editor on October 6, 2019

From Master Drawings:

Master Drawings, Ricciardi Prize
Applications due by 15 December 2019

Master Drawings announces an extended deadline of 15 December for submissions to the second annual Ricciardi prize. $5,000 for the best new and unpublished article on a drawings topic (of any period) by a scholar under the age of 40.

The average length is between 2,500 and 3,750 words, with five to twenty illustrations. Submissions should be no longer than 10,000 words and have no more than 100 footnotes. Please note that all submissions must be in article form, following the format of the journal. We will not consider submissions of seminar papers, dissertation chapters, or other written material that has not been adapted into the format of a journal article. Articles may be submitted in any language.

Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants

Posted in fellowships, opportunities by Editor on September 29, 2019

With more information available through CAA:

Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants
Applications due by 15 January 2020

The College Art Association is pleased to announce its administration of the Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants, which provide support to doctoral, postdoctoral, and senior scholars from both the US and outside the US for research topics dedicated to the art and visual culture of the United States prior to 1980. The grants foster firsthand engagement with American artworks and art-historical resources; build networks for non-US-based scholars studying American art; and expand access to artworks, scholarly materials, and communities for US-based scholars studying American art in an international context.

Now administered and juried by CAA, this grant program was initiated by the Terra Foundation in 2003 to fund European candidates. It was expanded to reach candidates worldwide in 2012 and opened to US-based researchers in 2017 to travel abroad, developing American art scholar networks around the world with a total of 173 grantees since its inception.

“We are excited to expand our partnership with the Terra Foundation to provide continued support for scholars of American art,” said David Raizman, interim executive director of CAA. “Research funding for domestic and international scholars is essential to the vitality of the field, and these generous grants from the Terra Foundation will facilitate the advancement of their work. The inclusion of international scholars for these grants is especially gratifying, as it promotes new perspectives and engages the wider scholarly community.”

Awards of up to $9,000 will be granted on a per project basis by a jury formed by CAA. The first awards will be announced in March of 2020.

CAA’s administration of the Terra Foundation for American Art Research Travel Grants continues a long history at CAA of supporting travel and scholarship for professionals and students in the visual arts and design. Other grants offered by CAA include the Professional Development Fellowships for Graduate Students, the Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, the Millard Meiss Publication Fund, the CAA Getty International Program, Travel Grants to the CAA Annual Conference, and introduced last year, the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

Call for Essays | Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize 2019

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on September 16, 2019

From ArtHist.net (9 September 2019) . . .

Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize 2019
Submissions due by 1 December 2019

The Oxford Art Journal Essay Prize for Early Career Researchers is now open for submissions until 1st December 2019. The annual Essay Prize seeks to further enhance Oxford Art Journal’s international reputation for publishing innovative scholarship, and can be on any topic relevant to art history. Submissions are encouraged from British and international doctoral students, as well as early career researchers who are within five years of gaining their PhD.

The winner will receive:
• Publication of the winning essay in Oxford Art Journal
• £500 worth of Oxford University Press books
• A year’s free subscription to Oxford Art Journal

Find out more by visiting the journal’s website.