Enfilade

The Art Bulletin, September 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 22, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of The Art Bulletin 104 (September 2022) . . .

A R T I C L E S

• Tomasz Grusiecki, “Doublethink: Polish Carpets in Transcultural Contexts,” pp. 29–54.
A group of carpets termed tapis polonais (French for “Polish carpets”) were mistakenly given this name in the nineteenth century, despite their Persian provenience. Today, these artifacts are often described as “so-called Polish carpets,” emphasizing the historical confusion which led to coining the phrase. Evidence from both early modern and modern archival and literary sources suggests, however, that to fully understand the significance of tapis polonais we must embrace their transcultural contexts. Embedded in ongoing cycles of recontextualization and reappropriation, tapis polonais effectively challenge outdated assumptions that cultural forms can be simply assigned to a single cultural region and its historical traditions.

Vincennes Manufactory, after Pierre Blondeau, after François Boucher, La Danseuse (Dancer), ca. 1752, soft-paste biscuit porcelain, 22 × 14 × 8 cm (Cleveland Museum of Art).

• Susan M. Wager, Boucher’s Spirit: Authorship, Invention, and the Force of Porcelain,” pp. 55–83.
Deemed “ridiculous dolls” by Johann Joachim Winckelmann, porcelain figurines have long resided on the outskirts of art history. The exceptional case of biscuit porcelain figurines, invented in France in the 1750s, has been folded into an anachronistic story of stylistic change. This essay disentangles the history of porcelain figurines from the history of Neoclassicism. Through a close reading of the abbé Jean-Bernard Le Blanc’s (1707–1781) art criticism and analysis of a 1761 set of reproductive prints, it shows that biscuit figurines designed by the quintessentially rococo painter François Boucher defied assumptions about porcelain’s irreducible materiality, complicating fundamental eighteenth-century ideas about authorship.

R E V I E W S

• Kirsten Pai Buick, Review of Aston Gonzalez, Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 2020); Paul Kaplan, Contraband Guides: Race, Transatlantic Culture, and the Arts in the Civil War Era (Penn State University Press, 2020); and Teresa Goddu, Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020), pp. 150–57.

• Atreyee Gupta, Review of Niharika Dinkar, Empires of Light: Vision, Visibility and Power in Colonial India (University of Manchester Press, 2019), pp. 158–60.

• Alina Payne, Review of Fabio Barry, Painting in Stone: Architecture and the Poetics of Marble from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (Yale University Press, 2020), pp. 160–63.

 

Print Quarterly, September 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 15, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.3 (September 2022)

Anonymous artist after Sébastien Leclerc, View of the Hall of Mirrors, ca. 1684, pen and brown ink, brown wash on paper, 13.6 × 9.1 cm (Musée National des Châteaux du Versailles, INV.DESS 1247).

Tomáš Valeš, “Franz Anton Maulbertsch, Jakob Matthias Schmutzer and the Allegory on the Edict of Toleration, 1785

This article discusses new insights into the painter Franz Anton Maulbertsch (1724–1796) and the creation of his print, the Allegory on the Edict of Toleration (1785). It adduces two letters from the engraver Jakob Mattias Schmutzer (1733–1811), his collaborator since the 1750s and later his father-in-law. The article discusses the strategies used for the print’s distribution and also presents an analysis of the print’s preparatory drawing and three proof impressions.

Antoine Gallay, “Sébastien Leclerc’s Preparatory Drawing for the View of the Hall of Mirrors (1684): A Reassessment”

This short article re-examines the status of a drawing acquired by the Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon in 2008, traditionally attributed to Sébastien Leclerc and thought to have been made in preparation for his famous print of the View of the Hall of Mirror (1684). The author also presents a second little known drawing which was most certainly made by Leclerc himself in preparation for the print. Comparison between this drawing and the print offers new insight on the early appearance of the Hall of Mirrors and on Leclerc’s artistic conception and practices.

The issue also includes these relevant notes and reviews:

Battle Engravings for the Emperors of China

Jean Michel Massing, Review of Henriette Lavaulx-Vrécourt, Niklas Leverenz and Alexey Pastukhov, Berlin Battle Engravings: 34 Copperplates for the Emperors of China / Berliner Schlachtenkupfer: 34 Druckplatten der Kaiser von China (Berlin: Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), p. 305.

Thomas Gainsborough in London

Anne Lyles, Review of Susan Sloman, Gainsborough in London (London: Modern Art Press, 2021), p. 307.

Utamaro and the Spectacle of Beauty

Adam Haliburton, Review of Julie Nelson Davis, Utamaro and the Spectacle of Beauty (London: Reaktion Books, 2021), p. 308.

The Waterloo Map of Pierre-Jacques Goetghebuer

Inge Misschaert has contributed a brief analysis of the much-copied Map of the Battle of Waterloo (1815) by Belgian architect and engraver Pierre-Jacques Goetghebuer. The article elaborates on the production history of Goetghebuer’s map and its context alongside other adventurous competitors seeking to illustrate the famous battle in its immediate aftermath.

The Reception of Raphael

Carlo Schmid, Review of Andres Stolzenburg and David Klemm, eds., Raffael: Wirkung eines Genies (Petersberg: Hamburger Kunsthalle and Michael Imhof Verlag, 2021), p. 315.

The review focuses on the cult of Raphael which took off at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

The Fruitful Encounter Between Engraving and Photography

Francesca Maria Bonetti, Review of Nicolas Devigne and Virginie Caudron, eds., Contacts – Photographie – Gravure: Jeux et Enjeux (Aire-sur-la-Lys: ateliergaleriéditions and éditions Musée de Gravelines, 2020), p. 318.

Bonetti discusses the different photomechanical processes based on proto-photographic experiments carried out between  1824 and 1827 and known as heliography.

The Burlington Magazine, August 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on September 13, 2022

The August issue of The Burlington is rich for the eighteenth century, including Karin Wolfe’s obituary for Christopher Johns (details for his memorial service, on 17 September, are emerging here).

The Burlington Magazine 164 (August 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “A Borromini-Inspired Church Plan in Eighteenth-Century Lima,” pp. 740–51.
Built in 1758–66, the Church of Los Huérfanos, Lima, is unique in Spanish South America for its oval plan. Its designer is her identified as a master builder, Cristóbal de Vergas, who was inspired by prints of Francesco Borromini’s S. Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome, exemplifying the revival of interest during the Rococo perios in Roman Baroque precedents.

• Adam Bowett, “The Floral Marquetry Floor at Burghley House,” pp. 752–59.
The possibility that five pieces of eighteenth-century furniture at Burghley House, Stamford, incorporate maquetry made for a floor in the house c.1685 is here confirmed by references in inventories. The marquetry can be linked to furniture in the Royal Collection, raising the possibility that the floor was mdade by Gerrit Jensen incorporating marquetry supplied by Jasper Braems.

• François Marandet, “A Modello by Louis Laguerre and the Programme of the Painted Hall at Chatsworth,” pp. 760–67.
With the help of a recently discovered modello, the subject of Louis Laguerre’s monumental painting on the east wall of the Painted Hall, Chatsworth, is here identified as Augustus Ordering the Closing of the Doors of the Temple of Janus. This allows the political allegory of the room’s decoration, completed in 1694, to be fully understood for the first time.

R E V I E W S

• Neil Jeffares, “Pastels in the Pandemic,” pp. 780–87.
The notoriously fragile medium of pastel has not been out of the public eye during the difficult circumstances of the past two years. Exhibition in San Francisco and Munich and a biography of Rosalba Carriera invite comparisons between the major pastellists of the eighteenth century: Joseph Vivien, Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, and Jean-Étienne Liotard, as well as Carriera.

• Reinier Baarsen, Review of Calin Demetrescu, Les ébénistes de la Couronne sous le règne de Louis XIV (La Bibliothèque des Arts, 2021), pp. 818–19.

• Daniel Fulco, Review of Andreas Schumacher, ed., Venezianische Malerei: Staatsgalerie in der Residenz Würzburg (Schnell & Steiner, 2021), pp. 819–21.

• Howard Coutts, Review of Patricia Ferguson, ed., Pots, Prints, and Politics: Ceramics with an Agenda, from the 14th to the 20th Century (British Museum Press, 2021), pp. 821–22.

• Sophie Rhodes, Review of Tessa Murdoch, Europe Divided: Huguenot Refugee Art and Culture (V&A Museum, 2021), pp. 827–28.

• Patrick Bade, Review of Charles Dellheim, Belonging and Betrayal: How Jews Made the Art World Modern (Brandeis University Press, 2021), p. 828.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Karin Wolfe, Obituary for Christopher M.S. Johns (1955–2022), pp. 829–31.
Professor of History of Art at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, since 2003, Christopher M.S. Johns published widely on Italian art of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. His determination to demonstrate the falsity of the belief that the settecento was a period of cultural decline had a substantial influence on both scholarship and academic curricula.

 

 

H-France Forum 17.5 (2022) | Anne Lafont’s L’art et la race

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on August 8, 2022

The latest issue of H-France Forum, edited by Melissa Hyde, is dedicated to Anne Lafont’s L’art et la race. Melissa notes that since she is issue editor for H-France Forum in art history, we can expect to see one issue a year devoted to a recent book in French art history. She welcomes suggestions. And with some 4000 subscribers, H-France is a great place to make art history more visible. So, send her your ideas! CH

H-France Forum 17.5 (2022)
Issue edited by Melissa Hyde, University of Florida

Anne Lafont, L’art et la race : l’Africain (tout) contre l’œil des Lumières (Dijon: Les presses du réel, 2019).

Review Essays
• Christy Pichichero, George Mason University
• Andrew Curran, Wesleyan University
• Zirwat Chowdhury, University of California, Los Angeles
• Charlotte Guichard, CNRS and Ecole Normale Supérieure

Response Essay
• Anne Lafont, EHESS

All essays are available here»

Print Quarterly, June 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 16, 2022

Hippolyte Pochon, Du Courage ! En avant Marche (Courage, forward march!), 1815, hand-coloured etching, 23 × 31cm
(Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale)

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The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.2 (June 2022)

Antony Griffiths, “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815, Part II.”

Part II of Antony Griffiths’ article on “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815” discusses the numerous new names, found only in these years, who deposited prints giving their surname and address. Most of these were the actual producers, and many of the most frequent names can be identified. The article turns to each of the main artists individually, many of whom were leading figures in the school of Jacques Louis David. They included Louis François Charon, Gautier, Charles François Gabriel Levachez, Pierre Audouin, Pierre Marie Bassompierre Gaston, Charles Marie Dubois-Maisonneuve, Pierre Lacroix, Louis Félix Legendre, Jean Jacques Théodore Sauvé, Desalle, Charles Elie, Michael Raphael Vautier and Hippolyte Pochon, whose work was particularly well-executed and imaginative.

 The issue also includes these relevant reviews:

Johann Georg Edlinger (1741–1819)

Hans Jakob Meier, Review of Brigitte Huber, Georg Edlinger: Porträts ohne Schmeichelei (Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2021), p. 194.

Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces

Nadine Orenstein, Review of Sam Segal and Klara Alen, Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces: Paintings, Drawings and Prints up to the Nineteenth Century (Leiden: Brill and Hes & De Graaf, 2020), p. 226.

The Burlington Magazine, May 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 13, 2022

The eighteenth century in the May issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (May 2022)

E D I T O R I A L

• “The Rustat Memorial,” p. 443.

When the statue of Edward Colston was defaced and thrown into Bristol harbour on 7th June 2020 the resulting publicity was so enormous that it seemed likely that a wholesale assault on memorials to men who took part in the slave trade or were racist would inevitably follow. In fact, remarkably little has happened. . . .

Little more has been done in the case of church monuments. . . . Only one such case is outstanding, an application by St Peter’s church, Dorchester, to move a late eighteenth-century wall memorial to the slave owner John Gordon from the church to Dorchester Museum. If such an application is contested the matter is referred to the judgment of a diocesan Chancellor in a Consistory Court. This was the result of the ecclesiastical case that has attracted most attention, the application by the Master and governing body of Jesus College, Cambridge, to remove the monument to Tobias Rustat (1608–94) from the college chapel, which was opposed by a group of former members of the college. The case was heard in February by David R. Hodge, Deputy Chancellor of the Diocese of Ely, who in March dismissed the application. Last month the college announced that it would not appeal against his decision. . .

A R T I C L E S

• Antoinette Friedenthal, “Prince Eugene of Savoy’s Rembrandt Drawings: A Newly Discovered Provenance,” pp. 450–61.

• Pascal-François Bertrand and Charissa Bremer David, “Paintings in Beauvais Tapestry, 1764–67,” pp. 462–72. In 1764, at a time when the Royal Tapestry Manufactory at Beauvais was short of work, its directors, Laurent and André Charlemagne Charron, initiated the weaving of small tapestry panels based on designs by François Boucher. Intended as inexpensive, independent works of art, they were in essence a short-lived marketing venture. Records of their weaving in the firm’s payment registers allow a number of surviving examples to be identified.

• Sofya Dmitrieva, “Carle Van Loo at the 1737 Salon,” pp. 473–77. Although not pendants in the traditional sense, since they were painted for different patrons, it is argued here that Carle Van Loo’s A Pasha Having His Mistress’s Portrait Painted and The Grand Turk Giving a Concert to His Mistress, shown at the Salon of 1737, were meant to be read as a pair|—as portraits of the artist and his wife and as allegories of Painting and Music. By linking the paintings, Van Loo, may have intended them to make a statement on the changing relations between art and patronage.

R E V I E W S

• Duncan Robinson, Review of Susan Sloman, Gainsborough in London (Modern Art Press, 2021), pp. 478–85.

• Satish Padiyar, Review of the exhibition Jacques-Louis David: Radical Draftsman (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2022), pp. 492–95.

• Kee Il Choi, Jr., Review of the exhibition Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Wallace Collection, and The Huntington, 2022–23), pp. 504–07.

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the re-installation of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Venetian paintings at the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice (from August 2021), pp. 507–09.

• Stefania Girometti, Review of Joachim Jacoby, Städels Erbe: Meisterzeichnungen aus der Sammlung des Stifters (Sandstein Verlag, 2020), pp. 529–30. Comprehensive analysis of “the collection of drawings assembled by Johann Friedrich S (1728–1816), the founder of the art institute and museum in Frankfurt that bears his name.”

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of the exhibition catalogue Watteau at Work: La Surprise (Getty, 2021), pp. 530–31.

• Hugo Chapman, Review of Cristiana Romalli, Cento Disegni dalla Collezione della Fondazione Marco Brunelli (Ugo Bozzi, 2020), pp. 531–32.

Call for Articles | Fall 2023 Issue of J18: Cold

Posted in Calls for Papers, journal articles by Editor on June 10, 2022

Victor Marie Picot, after Philippe de Loutherbourg, Winter, 1784, stipple and etching
(London: The British Museum)

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From the Call for Proposals for J18:

Journal18, Issue #16 (Fall 2023) — Cold
Issue edited by Michael Yonan, University of California, Davis

Proposals due by 15 September 2022; finished articles will be due by 31 March 2023

Feeling cool is increasingly a great privilege in our warming world. Cold weather arrives later each winter and departs sooner, lengthening warm seasons across the globe and reducing the cooler periods necessary to the planet’s healthy functioning. One need not be terribly old to have recollections of cooler times. Accompanying changes to global mean temperatures are erratic and often dangerous weather patterns, melting icecaps, rising seas, stronger storms, droughts, and other environmental transformations that, in sum, represent an existential problem for humankind.

The cause of these changes is the consumption of fossil fuels, which transformed human life profoundly in the pursuit of modernity. The origin of this transformation falls squarely in the eighteenth century; indeed the terminus post quem for measuring human effects on global temperatures is the year 1800. Recognizing this draws attention to a truth little noticed in art-historical scholarship: eighteenth-century art was made for a colder world than the one we now inhabit.

This special issue of Journal18 invites contributions that address the relationship between temperature and the art of the long eighteenth century. It seeks to insert eighteenth-century visual and material culture into the growing literature on historical climatology. The 1700s are the final century of the Little Ice Age, a climatological phenomenon characterized by lower global mean temperatures that took place between the late sixteenth and early nineteenth centuries. What are the implications of this climatological context for the narratives we tell about eighteenth-century art? How did an Enlightenment understanding of temperature inflect the period’s art? And do the conditions of eighteenth-century life, as filtered through the period’s artistic production, help us understand why the world became warmer?

Potential topics include the relationship between architecture and temperature, including the technologies used to keep buildings warm or cool; the material culture of gauging temperature (thermometers, barometers, hygrometers, etc.); pictorial representations of extreme climates, e.g., the tropics or the Arctic; the relationship between theories of climate and the representation of peoples; clothing and body temperature; the sub-Arctic north as a cultural space; and the visualization of industrialization. Particularly welcome are essays from a technical art history perspective that address challenges to conserving eighteenth-century things in a warming world.

To submit a proposal, send an abstract (250 words) and brief biography by 15 September 2022 to the following two addresses: editor@journal18.org and meyonan@ucdavis.edu. Articles should not exceed 6000 words (including footnotes) and will be due by 31 March 2023 for publication later that year. For further details on submission and Journal18 house style, see Information for Authors.

Call for Articles | William Hogarth and Cinema

Posted in Calls for Papers, journal articles by Editor on June 4, 2022

Paul Sandby, Satire with Hogarth as a Magic Lantern Projecting a Parody of his ‘Paul before Felix’, 1753, etching
(London: British Museum, Cc,3.12)

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From the Call for Papers:

William Hogarth and Cinema
Special issue of Ecrans (Spring 2024), edited by Marie Gueden and Pierre Von-Ow

Abstracts due by 5 September 2022; drafts due by 30 March 2023

According to Sergei Eisenstein, “Diderot talked about cinema.” It could likewise be suggested that the eighteenth-century artist William Hogarth (1697–1764) inaugurated cinematic discourse. Through his visual and theoretical work, Hogarth offers a crucial contribution to the narrative and aesthetic reflections that predate—and somehow anticipate—the invention of cinema. Eisenstein did indeed comment upon and commend Hogarth’s visual productions (praising in particular his stage-like compositions and visual narratives articulated in sequences of images). The Russian filmmaker admired his English predecessor’s artistic theory, preoccupied with the movement of bodies and gazes: Eisenstein appropriated the idea of a “line of beauty” developed in Hogarth’s The Analysis of Beauty in his directing and editing. Yet, the filmic potentialities of Hogarth’s work and ideas still await extended critical and scholarly attention. The artist’s name appears sporadically in film studies that mention his influence for set designs—especially in Hollywood where Fritz Lang, Mark Robson, and Stanley Kubrick, among others, drew from Hogarth’s works to stage their historical films—and on the legacy of his artistic writings in film theory and criticism. The abundant art historical literature devoted to Hogarth, however, rarely evokes the artist’s cinematographic legacy. A special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Ecrans (No. 20, Spring 2024), to be published in French and English, seeks to explore the largely understudied connections between William Hogarth and global and expanded cinema.

We invite papers on topics that may include (but are not limited to):
• Pre-cinema, with particular emphasis on magic lanterns and early cinema, for example, filmed tableaux vivants
• William Hogarth in Hollywood, especially in the studios’ archives
• The temporality of images and sequencing of visual narratives
• Graphic novels, illustrated journals, and cartoons
• Adaptations of literary ‘Progresses’ between prints, paintings, theatre, performance, film, TV series, etc.
• Case studies from global cinema, including art documentaries
• Experimental cinema, particularly the challenging of narrative linearity
• The legacy of Hogarth’s satirical work in comedy, including productions featuring Hogarth as a character of fiction
• The legacy of Hogarth’s artistic theory and his “line of beauty” in film theory (for example through various visual shorthand systems) and criticism
• Marxist, feminist, and post-colonial currents in the reception of Hogarth’s work

Please submit a proposal by 5 September 2022 in English or French (up to 400 words), as well as a short bio, to the guest editors of this special issue: Marie Gueden (marie.gueden@univ-lyon2.fr) and Pierre Von-Ow (pierre.von-ow@yale.edu). Final papers should not exceed 8000 words. First drafts expected on 30 March 2023 for publication in April 2024. Feel free to contact us if any questions should arise before submitting your proposal. More information about Ecrans is available here.

Journal18, Spring 2022 — Race

Posted in journal articles by Editor on May 16, 2022

From J18:

Journal18, Issue #13 (Spring 2022) — Race: Representation in the French Colonial Empire
Edited by Susannah Blair and Stephanie O’Rourke

I N T E R V E N T I O N S

• Making Whiteness: Art, Luxury, and Race in Eighteenth-Century France — Marika Takanishi Knowles

• Some Thoughts on Fashion and Race in the Classroom; or, TikTok, Cottagecore, and the Allure of Eighteenth-Century Empire Style Dress — Alicia Caticha

• Order and Disorder: The Iconography of Morality and Colonial Enslavement — Christelle Lozère

• Ethno-geographies in the Making of Enlightenment Cartography: The Mural Maps of Jean Janvier and Sébastien-G. Longchamps (1754) — Íris Kantor and Milena Natividade da Cruz

A R T I C L E S

• Latitudes of Tenderness: Imagining Nouvelle France in the Ancien Régime — J. Cabelle Ahn

• Overseeing Senegal: French Prints of the Late-Eighteenth-Century Slave Trade — Katherine Calvin

Issue Editors
Susannah Blair, Columbia University
Stephanie O’Rourke, University of St Andrews

Cover image: Marie-Joseph-Hyacinthe Savart, Four Creole Women, 1770, pastel on paper, 56 × 45 cm (Musée Schoelcher, Pointe-à-Pitre).

Call for Articles | Thresholds 51: Heat

Posted in Calls for Papers, journal articles by Editor on May 4, 2022

From Thresholds:

Thresholds 51: Heat
Edited by Hampton Smith and Zachariah DeGiulio

Submissions are due by 1 June 2022

Thresholds is the annual peer-reviewed journal produced by the MIT Department of Architecture, held in over 150 university art & architecture libraries around the world. Content features leading scholars and practitioners from the fields of architecture, art, and culture.

Heat is elusive: always on the move, always fugitive. Though we have many signs of its presence—sweating, ‘hot’ and ‘cool’ media, sitting under the shade, catching fire—heat itself largely evades conventional forms of representation. As the transference of energy from one system to another, heat radiates and penetrates. Immanent and intense, heat binds and nourishes as much as it reshapes or destroys. While helping us navigate the material world as tool, medium, and affect, heat forces us to come to terms with the fragility of the systems in which we take part. And though temperature is regularly mapped across graphs and thermometers, the feeling of heat is often so localized and so personal that it evades historic perception altogether. Even if we know things are hotter now than they were yesterday, where is heat within art and architecture practice?

Thresholds 51: Heat takes enthalpy—the thermodynamic property that comprises heat, pressure, and volume to effect chemical state change—as its guiding principle. We seek scholarly writing, artistic interventions, and criticism from art, architecture, and related fields to apply pressure within the volume to effect disciplinary state change. We aim to discover the ways art and architecture have historically navigated, wielded, and avoided heat.

Courtyard buildings across the Islamic world produce thermal delight; Mande blacksmiths carefully wield heat to make iron tools for repairing and nourishing communities; museum conservators curate temperature-controlled environments for artworks; Yurok practices of fire stewardship regulate natural rhythms of growth and decay. And though thermodynamic flux underlies such practices of making and maintenance, heat just as frequently effaces or prevents knowledge production—think of the conflagration of the University of Cape Town’s special collections or mold consuming boxes of archival material.

Recognizing that heat has never been evenly felt, from the violently racialized fictions of the ‘torrid zone’ to the lack of adequate shade in urban communities, we are particularly invested in alternative architectural or aesthetic mobilizations of heat—in the contestation of thermal violence, in the activation of ritual, or in the warmth of community, desire, and lust. A critical account of heat within art and architecture must attend to its use as a medium and structure of violence, while nevertheless exploring how ‘feeling the heat’ productively links scales of being, practices, and types of labor.

Please send all submissions to the editors via email at thresh@mit.edu with the subject heading THAT’S HOT. Essay submissions should be in English, approximately 3000 words, and formatted in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style. Submission should include a brief cover letter, contact information, and bio of 50–75 words for each author. Text should be submitted in MS Word. Images should be submitted at 72 dpi as uncompressed TIFF files. Other creative proposals, including, but certainly not limited to, performances, poetry, and film are not limited in size or medium. All scholarly submissions are subject to peer review.

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