Enfilade

Eighteenth-Century Studies, Summer 2018

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on August 6, 2018

While there’s plenty to relish in the latest issue of ECS, I’m glad to highlight, in particular, this important article by Paris Amanda Spies-Gans. I’ve also listed all three single title book reviews; while none of them deal specifically with the visual arts, it’s easy to see (perhaps particularly with the first two) points of methodological relevancy for art history. CH

Eighteenth-Century Studies 51.4 (Summer 2018)

A R T I C L E S

• Paris Amanda Spies-Gans, “Exceptional, but not Exceptions: Public Exhibitions and the Rise of the Woman Artist in London and Paris, 1760–1830,” pp. 393–416.

From 1760 to 1830, more than 1,300 women exhibited more than 6,000 works of art in London and Paris’ premier art exhibitions—an unprecedented surge in female artistic activity and its public reception. This article traces that transformation, which strikingly mirrors the progress of the French Revolutionary Wars, and contends that the Revolutionary era opened vital opportunities for female artists on both sides of the Channel despite cultural differences. It thus argues for a recasting of period’s historical narrative to integrate women’s omnipresence in the public, professional art world, and a reevaluation of their hitherto dominant categorization as ‘amateur’ artists. It also challenges the historiographical argument that the Revolutionary era was principally a defeat for women in Britain and France.

R E V I E W S

• Kristina Straub, Review of Susan Lanser, The Sexuality of History: Modernity and the Sapphic, 1565–1830 (The University of Chicago, 2014), pp. 479–82.
• Renee Bryzik, Review of Katrin Berndt, Narrating Friendship and the British Novel, 1760–1830 (Routledge, 2017), pp. 483–85.
• Nancy Vogeley, Review of Jonathan Israel, The Expanding Blaze: How the American Revolution Ignited the World, 1775–1848 (Princeton University Press, 2017), pp. 485–87.

The Art Bulletin, June 2018

Posted in journal articles by Editor on August 4, 2018

In the current issue of The Art Bulletin 100 (June 2018):

Oliver Wunsch, “Watteau, through the Cracks,” pp. 37–60.

Antoine Watteau’s paintings decayed rapidly. Soon after his death, his contemporaries bemoaned the cracks ravaging his works. They regarded the problem as the product of Watteau’s restless character, noting that his shortsighted personality led him to paint improperly. A deeper explanation situates Watteau’s impatient attitude and impermanent techniques within an emerging culture of ephemeral consumption. An examination of the afterlife of Watteau’s decaying work in the form of reproduction points to an alternative understanding of permanence based less on material immutability than on commercial dissemination. Permanence has a history, and Watteau offers insight into a crucial transition.

Holly Shaffer, “‘Take All of Them’: Eclecticism and the Arts of the Pune Court in India, 1760–1800,” pp. 61–93.

At the peshwa’s court in the western Indian city of Pune in the late eighteenth century, the powerful minister Nana Fadnavis deliberately formulated an eclectic aesthetic. From soliciting Mughal and Rajput paintings at North Indian imperial centers such as Delhi and Jaipur to employing painters from South India and the painter James Wales from Britain, Fadnavis sought entry into a worldly artistic culture. Yet he balanced his cosmopolitan ambitions with emphasis on local devotional traditions. The resultant eclecticism would transform the nature of human and divine representation at the court, and it offers a model for investigating this period today.

The Burlington Magazine, July 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on July 21, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (July 2018)

E D I T O R I A L

• Michael Hall, “At the Royal Academy of Arts,” p. 535. This is the Royal Academy’s year. The venerable London institution has celebrated its 250th anniversary by unveiling a redevelopment that has added seventy per cent more public space, staging a Summer Exhibition that has garnered five-star reviews, mounting an exhibition, The Great Spectacle, which traces the history of the annual exhibition since its inception in 1768, and publishing a monumental multi-author history of itself and its collections. . . .

A R T I C L E S

• Dorothea Diemer and Linda Hinners, “‘Gerhardt Meyer Made Me in Stockholm’: A Bronze ‘Bathing Woman’ after Giambologna,” pp. 545–53. Spurred by rivalry with French founders working for the Swedish Crown, in 1697 Gerhardt Meyer the Elder cast a bronze figure of a nude woman after a marble by Giambologna that had been in Sweden since 1632. It is inscribed ‘Me fecit Gerhardt Meyer Holmiae’.

R E V I E W S

• Laurel O. Peterson, Review of the exhibition Visitors to Versailles, 1682–1789 (Château de Versailles, 2017–18; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2018), pp. 582–84.
• Louis Cellauro and Gilbert Richaud, Review of the exhibition Jacques-François Blondel: An Enlightenment Architect in Metz (The Arsenal, Metz, 2018), pp. 584–86.
• Paul Taylor, Review of Susanna Berger, The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment (Princeton University Press, 2017), pp. 606–07.
• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Ilona Katzew, ed., Painted in Mexico / Pintado en México, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici (Prestel, 2017), pp. 607–08.
• Sophie Littlewood, Review of Donald J. La Rocca, How to Read European Armor (Metropolitan Museum of Art and Yale University Press, 2017), p. 613.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Andrew Wilton, Obituary of Malcolm Cormack (1935–2018), p. 617. When the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, opened in 1977, Malcolm Cormack was its first Curator of Paintings. At Yale, and subsequently at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, he staged influential exhibitions on subjects ranging from William Blake to the Camden Town Group.

 

Grey Room, Recent Issues

Posted in journal articles by Editor on June 28, 2018

Some of the articles addressing the eighteenth century in recent issues of Grey Room:

Grey Room

Editors: Zeynep Çelik Alexander, Lucia Allais, Eric C.H. de Bruyn, Noam M. Elcott, Byron Hamann, John Harwood, and Matthew C. Hunter

Grey Room brings together scholarly and theoretical articles from the fields of architecture, art, media, and politics to forge a cross-disciplinary discourse uniquely relevant to contemporary concerns. Publishing some of the most interesting and original work within these disciplines, Grey Room has positioned itself at the forefront of current aesthetic and critical debates. Featuring original articles, translations, interviews, dossiers, and academic exchanges, Grey Room emphasizes aesthetic practice and historical and theoretical discourse that appeals to a wide range of readers, including architects, artists, scholars, students, and critics.

No. 71 (Spring 2018) The Costs of Architecture

• Jason Nguyen, “Building on Credit: Architecture and the Mississippi Bubble (1716–1720),” pp. 40–67.

No. 69 (Fall 2017) Liquid Intelligence

• Jennifer L. Roberts, “The Veins of Pennsylvania: Benjamin Franklin’s Nature-Print Currency,” pp. 50–79
• Matthew C. Hunter, “The Cunning of Sir Sloshua: Reynolds, the Sea, and Risk,” pp. 80–107.

The Burlington Magazine, June 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 26, 2018

As the June 2018 issue of The Burlington launches a new design (the work of Studio Frank), editor Michael Hall provides a brief overview of the history of the journal’s design in his editorial comments, noting that “many readers now access the magazine in its digital edition and for most people the first sight of the cover is likely to be on the screen of a tablet or smartphone, meaning that it has to work on a small scale” (453).

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (June 2018)

A R T I C L E S

• Tessa Murdoch, “A Set of Silver-Gilt Waiters by Benjamin Pyne for the Courtenay Family of Powderham Castle, Devon,” pp. 478–89.

R E V I E W S

• Xavier F. Salomon, Review of the exhibition Tiepolo Segreto (Vicenza: Palladio Museum, 2017–18), pp. 495–97.
• Sanda Miller, Review of the exhibition Fashioned from Nature (London: V&A, 2018), 497–99.
• Steven Jaron, Review of John Onians, European Art: A Neuroarthistory (Yale UP, 2016), 516–17.
• Antoine Maës, Review of Alexandre Maral, François Girardon (1628–1715): Le Sculpteur de Louis XIV (Arthena, 2015), p. 519.
• Clare Hornsby, Review of Paola Bianchi and Karin Wolfe, eds., Turin and the British in the Age of the Grand Tour (Cambridge UP, 2017), pp. 520–21.
• Jonathan Brown, Review of Elena Santiago Páez, ed., Ceán Bermúdez: Historiador del arte y coleccionista ilustrado (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, 2016), p. 521.
• Timothy Wilcox, Review of Ann Gunn, The Prints of Paul Sandby (1731–1809): A Catalogue Raisonné (Brepols, 2016), pp. 521–23.
• Caroline Finkel, Review of Francis Russell, 123 Places in Turkey: A Private Grand Tour (Bitter Lemon Press, 2017), p. 527.

 

Early Modern French Studies 40 (2018)

Posted in journal articles by Editor on June 24, 2018

Three of the articles focus specifically on the eighteenth century:

Early Modern French Studies 40 (2018)
Anticipated Afterlives: Envisaging Posterity in Early Modern France

• Oliver Wunsch, “Diderot and the Materiality of Posterity,” 63–78.
• John Leigh, “Posterity and Progeny: Memoirs and Autobiographical Writing in the Late Eighteenth Century,” 79–92.
• Olivier Ritz, “La Postérité Littéraire à l’Epreuve de la Révolution,” 93–101.

An excerpt from Jessica Goodman’s introduction to the issue:

Much work has been done on the questions of reception history, literary influence, commemoration, and life writing. Rather than treading over the same ground, however, this volume, in a self-reflexive twist, addresses what we have called ‘anticipated afterlives’: the different ways in which early modern individuals are aware that they stand to ‘live on’ in some sense after their biological death, and how they attempt to manage this transition to posterity. This focus on the ‘before’ of anticipation rather than the ‘after’ of posthumous reputation derives from the idea that posterity, in its purest sense, can only ever be anticipated. It is almost always a projection into an unknown future, a continually receding vanishing point. The individual, standing Janus-like between a lived but disappearing past, and a future that retreats as he approaches it attempts nonetheless to fix a version of that past (whether his own, or that of another) for those to come, whose interpretations he can only guess at.

Kee Il Choi, On Johannes Kip and Export Landscape Painting

Posted in journal articles by Editor on June 23, 2018

Johannes Kip, A Prospect of West-minster & A Prospect of the City of London, Netherlands, ca. 1720; two engravings, printed from two plates on four sheets of paper, 51 × 234 cm overall (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017.128a,b).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

In the latest issue of The Rijksmuseum Bulletin, a paper that emerged from a 2017 ASECS session on Art Markets organized by Wendy Roworth.

The Rijksmuseum Bulletin 66.2 (2018)

Dish, or Plate, ca. 1730, hard paste porcelain, 28.4 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Joseph V. McMullan, 58.126).

Kee Il Choi, Jr., “‘Partly Copies from European Prints’: Johannes Kip and the Invention of Export Landscape Painting in Eighteenth-Century Canton,” pp. 120–43.

This paper introduces the way Johannes Kip’s A Prospect of Westminster & A Prospect of the City of London (c. 1720) furnished the design for a handscroll of the Thames River enamelled on the rim of a renowned armorial porcelain service made around 1730–40. Having thus situated an important exemplar of northern European landscape art in China by 1750, it further suggests that Kip’s topographic print may well have played an influential, not to say seminal role in the conceptualization of monumental, panoramic handscrolls of the foreign factories from which ultimately the iconic landscape genre emerged. Descriptive of the site of both commerce and aesthetic exchange, these export paintings have exercised a lasting hold on the historical imagination. In as much as export porcelain signified the China trade for Westerners, export paintings came to represent Canton, if not the whole of China for a global audience.

Journal18, #5 Coordinates (Spring 2018)

Posted in journal articles by Editor on June 12, 2018

The fifth issue of J18 is now available:

Journal18, Issue #5: Coordinates (Spring 2018)
Digital Mapping & Eighteenth-Century Visual, Material, and Built Cultures
Issue Editors: Carrie Anderson and Nancy Um

Spurred by the collection, preservation, and distribution of spatial data—practices that have both collapsed and expanded our own discursive geographies—art historians are poised to harness fully the potential of geospatial analysis for the study of visual, material, and built cultures. This issue of Journal18 features current scholarship that relies on the analytical power provided by digital mapping interfaces for the study of the long eighteenth century. As Hannah Williams shows in her article on the locations of eighteenth-century artists’ studios in Paris, georectification tools can reconcile historical figurations of space with the present urban fabric, while digital mapping applications have made it possible to visualize patterns of artists’ stasis and movement. These platforms can also show the dynamic lives of mobile and fungible objects along circuitous, and sometimes unknowable, trajectories, as discussed in Catherine Walsh’s treatment of the “unsettled” parts of Bartolomeo Ammannati’s Juno Fountain that travelled around Florence for over four hundred years. Sophie Raux has made clear the possibilities afforded by mapping the Pont Notre-Dame, enhanced by 3D architectural reconstructions that allow her to address long-standing questions about Antoine Watteau’s painting of one of its shops. The interdisciplinary team of Michael Simeone, Christopher Morris, Kenton McHenry, and Robert Markley have demonstrated how computational methods can be used to analyze large datasets drawn from historical maps of the Great Lakes, thus offering new modes of seeing that exceed the human eye’s perceptive capabilities. But, even as these articles display the possibilities opened up by mapping tools, data-driven methods, and digital technologies, each author is deeply aware of their limitations. As the essays in this issue demonstrate, computational approaches to the spatial humanities—which are marked by intellectual decisions, obstacles, and quandaries—must join rather than replace or supersede an existing toolkit of historically grounded methods that are based on critical analysis, close looking, and a deep skepticism about the transparent meaning of any image or map.

In addition to these four full-length articles, this issue contains three shorter “Compass Points,” which reflect on projects in progress or already implemented, including the legacy of the famous Nolli map of Rome, the distribution of Baroque-period continent allegories found in buildings in Germany and Austria, and a planned database of Caribbean architecture. This issue also includes a roundtable that features contributions from faculty and students who worked on Itinera, a digital project that traces historical networks of cultural mobility and travel, housed in the Visual Media Workshop at the University of Pittsburgh.

Supported by a Digital Development Award for Art History Publishing from the Association of Research Institutes in Art History (ARIAH), this issue showcases two different electronic publishing interfaces, in addition to the WordPress platform on which Journal18 is currently offered. Williams’ article is presented on Quire, a static-site publication framework that features a durable and media-rich environment with enhanced discoverability, currently under development by Getty Publications. The roundtable is presented on Scalar, developed by the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture at the University of Southern California, which facilitates non-linear, multi-vocal, and multi-modal digital presentations. Through these varied modes of output and presentation, this issue thus also engages with the ongoing question of how to best present current digital scholarship, while highlighting interactivity and integrating new modes of expression and sources of evidence.

A R T I C L E S

Artists’ Studios in Paris: Digitally Mapping the 18th-Century Art World
Hannah Williams

Unsettled Sculptures: Mapping the Afterlife of Ammannati’s Juno Fountain
Catherine Walsh

Virtual Explorations of an 18th-Century Art Market Space: Gersaint, Watteau, and the Pont Notre-Dame
Sophie Raux

The Canoe and the Superpixel: Image Analysis of the Changing Shorelines on Historical Maps of the Great Lakes
Michael Simeone, Christopher Morris, Kenton McHenry, and Robert Markley

C O M P A S S  P O I N T S

A Digital Extension of a Roman Cartographic Classic: The 1748 Nolli Map and its Legacy
James Tice

Continent Allegories in the Baroque Age – A Database
Marion Romberg

Caribes: Designing a Digital Database for Caribbean Architecture and the Problem of Overlapping Spaces
Paul Niell

R O U N D T A B L E

Itinera’s Displacements: A Roundtable
Christopher Drew Armstrong, Lily Brewer, Jennifer Donnelly, Alison Langmead, Vibeka McGyver, and Meredith North

Print Quarterly, June 2018

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 1, 2018

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 35.2 (June 2018):

Juan Camarón, Robinson in his Llama Skin Habit and Parasol, 1788–89, brush and grey wash, 110 × 65 mm (London, British Library).

A R T I C L E S
• Benito Navarrete Prieto and Alejandro Martínez Pérez, “Drawings for the Spanish Robinson Crusoe by José Juan Camarón and Rafael Ximeno,” pp. 160–72.
The article addresses newly identified drawings by José Camarón and Rafael Ximeno for the seminal Spanish edition of Robinson Crusoe by Tomás de Iriarte, published in Madrid in 1789. The presence of the drawing for the map and the narrative illustrations among Iriarte’s papers underscore the poet’s close involvement with the book’s production and illustration.
• Kate Heard, “The Royal Collection of Satirical Prints in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” pp. 173–82.
In describing the the history of the collection of satirical prints in Britain’s royal collection before their sale in 1921 to the Library of Congress, the article explains the origins of the collection under George III, its development most famously under George IV, its continued growth under Queen Victoria and Prince Albert—when Georgian works entered the collection that would not have been acquired earlier, including prints that were critical of the royal family—and finally the disfavor the collection solicited during the reign of George V from the royal librarian John Fortescue, who brokered the 1921 sale.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S
• Celina Fox, Review of Bernard Nurse, London: Prints and Drawings before 1800 (Bodleian Library, 2017), pp. 198–200.
• Susan Sloman, Review of Ann Gunn, The Prints of Paul Sandby (1731–1809): A Catalogue Raisonné (Brepols and Harvey Miller Publishers, 2016), pp. 200–03.
• Flavia Pesci, Review of the exhibition catalogue Nicholas Stanley Price, At the Foot of the Pyramid: 300 Years of the Cemetery for Foreigners in Rome (Casa di Goethe Museum, 2016), pp. 203–04.
• Mark McDonald, Review of the catalogue Peter Raissis, Prints and Drawings: Europe 1500–1900 from the Art Gallery of New South Wales (Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2014), pp. 204–06.
• Charles Newton, Review of Elisabeth Fraser, Mediterranean Encounters: Artists between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774–1839 (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2017), pp. 206–09.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Note (added 6 June 2018) — The original posting did not include descriptions for the two articles.

The Burlington Magazine, May 2018

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on May 31, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (May 2018)

Agostino Cornacchini, Charlemagne, 1725, marble (St Peter’s Basilica).

A R T I C L E S

• Gloria Martínez Leiva, “Art as Diplomacy: John Closterman’s Portraits of Carlos II of Spain and His Wife Queen Maria Anna of Neuburg,” pp. 381–86.
• Teresa Leonor M. Vale, “Art and Festivities in Eighteenth-Century Rome: Letters from a Portuguese Priest, 1721–22,” pp. 387–93.

R E V I E W S

• Christopher Rowell, Review of the exhibition Thomas Chippendale: A Celebration of Craftsmanship and Design, 1718–2018 (Leeds City Museum, 2018), pp. 414–16.
• Charles Darwent, Review of the exhibition The Dutch in Paris, 1789–1914 (Paris: Petit Palais, 2018), pp. 420–21.
• Stéphane Loire, Review of Giancarlo Sestieri, Il capriccio architettonico in Italia nel XVII e XVIII secolo (Etgraphiae editoriale, 2015), p. 432.
• Andrew McClellan, Review of Geneviève Bresc-Bautier and Béatrice de Chancel-Bardelot, eds., Un musée révolutionaire: Le Musée des Monuments français d’Alexandre Lenoir (Musée du Louvre, 2016), pp. 432–33.