Enfilade

Metropolitan Museum Journal 2020

Posted in journal articles by Editor on January 6, 2021

The 2020 issue of the Metropolitan Museum Journal is now available at The University of Chicago Press website and The Met Store. PDF’s are available for free on MetPublications. Of particular note for dix-huitièmistes:

Metropolitan Museum Journal 55 (2020)

R E S E A R C H  N O T E S

Carmontelle, Portrait of Jean-Pierre de Bougainville, ca. 1760, watercolor over graphite and black and red chalk, 30 × 19 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, 2004.475.6).

Margot Bernstein, “Carmontelle’s Telltale Marks and Materials,” pp. 135–44.

Bernstein addresses three portraits heretofore described as autograph works by the French amateur draftsman Louis Carrogis, called Carmontelle (1717–1806). She confirms the attribution of the Portrait of Jean-Pierre de Bougainville but cast doubts on the other two. As she notes in the conclusion, “The discoveries outlined here have enabled the present author to identify additional inauthentic Carmontelle portraits in public and private collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.24 In fact, the majority of purported autograph replicas of Carmontelle portraits in international collections are not authentic. Most of these problematic works display technical issues that are consistent with those found in the Robert Lehman Collection drawings. . .” (142).

Daniel Wheeldon, “The Met’s German Keyed Guitar,” pp. 145–56.

In providing context, Wheeldon addresses the eighteenth century, too. As he writes in the introduction, “The keyed guitar at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, made in Germany in the mid-nineteenth century [89.4.3145], was part of the collection of musical instruments originally established by Mary Elizabeth Adams Brown in 1889. This guitar has long been worthy of greater attention, despite its being neither the most ornate example of nineteenth-century guitar making nor an object that fits into a clear tradition of guitar playing. The ingenuity of its design has been overshadowed by the instrument’s peculiarity, current state of deterioration, and plainness, and consequently it has entirely avoided academic coverage. As the only such instrument in a public collection, and one that bears two labels inside—’Matteo Sprenger / fece à Carlsruhe1 1843′, and ‘F. Fiala’—the Museum’s keyed guitar is essential to identifying and contextualizing (145) the sparse body of nineteenth-century literature on the topic. This article examines the history of the nineteenth-century keyed guitar using the Metropolitan Museum’s instrument as the basis for understanding the provenance of other instruments and establishing them within an historical narrative” (147).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Note (added 6 January 2020) — Submissions for next year’s volume are due by 15 September 2021; more information is available from the 2020 issue, immediately after the table of contents.

Print Quarterly, December 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 12, 2020

Meissen bowl with leopard licking its paw, after engraving with six leopards (see below), part of Hanbury Williams service, ca. 1745, porcelain, diameter 340 mm.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Malcolm Jones, “Early Modern English Prints in the Joseph Ames Album at the Morgan Library,” pp. 411–31.

This article publishes, for the first time, some of the contents of an album in the Morgan Library and Museum, New York, entitled Emblematical and Satirical Prints in Persons and Professions. Compiled around 1750 by Joseph Ames (1689–1759) and containing 237 miscellaneous European prints. About 125 are catalogued as English; 33 of these are unique or exceedingly rare examples and are discussed in detail throughout the article. The remaining English prints in the album are described in an appendix.

N O T E S  A N D  R EV I E W S

Anonymous artist, Six Leopards, from album with prints of animals published by Joos de Bosscher, 1581–1600, engraving, 125 x 177 mm (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum).

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, Review of Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre grafischen Vorlagen (2018), pp. 465–69.

This note reviews a two-volume publication about print sources for imagery on eighteenth-century Meissen porcelain. Where possible, the catalogue of 475 entries presents the names of the artists, engravers or publishers of Dutch, French, German, and Italian print sources used.

Tom Young, Review of Douglas Fordham, Aquatint Worlds: Travel, Print, and Empire, 1770–1820 (2019), pp. 470–74.

This note, and the book it reviews, emphasises the close ties the medium of aquatint has with British exploration and imperialism. Using J.R. Abbey’s (1894–1969) collection of aquatint travel books, today held by the Yale Center for British Art, the case studies show how aquatint’s advantages in colour and detail helped to convey antiquarian details with meticulous accuracy, but that it also had a broader impact on developing a community of taste dependent on travel and the recognition of difference.

Introducing Materia: Journal of Technical Art History

Posted in journal articles by Editor on December 9, 2020

From Materia:

Introducing Materia: Journal of Technical Art History

We are pleased to announce the inauguration of an open-source, peer reviewed journal Materia: Journal of Technical Art History. This biannual publication, the first issue of which is set to launch in the spring of 2021, will provide an online, open-access platform devoted to the technical study of art objects. Bringing together the disciplines of conservation, conservation science, art history, and related disciplines, Materia will be among the first peer-reviewed publications dedicated solely to this steadily growing field of interdisciplinary research.

Editorial Team
Bianca Garcia, Balboa Art Conservation Center (San Diego, CA)
Courtney Books, St. Louis Art Museum (St. Louis, MO)
Cynthia Prieur, Queen’s University (Kingston, ON)
Emma Jansson, Stockholm University (Stockholm, Sweden)
Julie Ribits, Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University (Bloomington, IN)
Lucia Bay, Philadelphia Museum of Art (Philadelphia, PA)
Morgan Wylder, Balboa Art Conservation Center (San Diego, CA)
Roxy Sperber, Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields (Indianapolis, IN)

Print Quarterly, September 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 2, 2020

Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, Double Portrait of Johann Elias Haid and Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, ca. 1778–84, oil on copper, 31 × 38 cm (image courtesy Boris Wilnitsky Fine Arts, Vienna).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

 

The eighteenth-century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly (with apologies for being so slow! -Craig).

Print Quarterly 37.3 (September 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Julie Mellby, “Audubon’s Copperplates for Birds of America”, pp. 283–93.

After a brief introduction to John James Audubon’s (1785–1851) life and the publication history of his famous Birds of America, this article explores the afterlife of the copperplates. Partly damaged during a fire and later sold as used copper, some of these objects were eventually acquired and restored by William E. Dodge II (1832–1903). Their history interestingly overlaps with the history of important American institutions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Princeton University Art Museum.

Marianne A. Yule, “A Friendship Portrait of J. J. Mettenleiter and J. E. Haid”, pp. 294–99.

This piece focuses on a newly discovered painting and its related mezzotint, the only known collaborative work between the printmaker John Elias Haid (1739–1809) and the painter Johann Jakob Mettenleiter (1750–1825). It explores the history of the image and identifies all the prints depicted therein.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Peter Van Der Coelen, Review of Henk van Nierop, The Life of Romeyn de Hooghe 1645–1708: Prints, Pamphlets, and Politics in the Dutch Golden Age (2018), pp. 314–16.

The note, as the book it reviews, sheds light on the lesser known, yet extremely prolific Romeyn de Hooghe (1645–1708), a printmaker operating between the Netherlands and Paris. His prints depict the political events of the day, such as the French invasion of Holland, as well as fashionable pastimes, as exemplified by his illustrations for a treatise on wrestling. De Hooghe’s life and work attest to the rising dominance of France all over Europe in the age of Louis XIV, both politically and artistically.

Domenico Pino, Review of Xavier F. Salomon, Andrea Tomezzoli and Denis Ton, Tiepolo in Milan: The Lost Frescoes of Palazzo Archinto (2019), pp. 319–21.

The catalogue under review reconstructs a cycle of frescoes commissioned for an aristocratic Milanese palace and destroyed during World War II. The note focuses on one chapter in particular, analysing Giambattista Tiepolo’s (1697–1770) early career as a book illustrator in Verona and Milan in the 1720s and ’30s, reading it in the context of the cultural fervour that spread all over Italy following the war of Spanish succession.

Domenico Pino, Review of Canaletto & Venezia (2019), pp. 321–22.

The note offers an overview of eighteenth-century Venice and the cultural fervour it hosted. The exhibition catalogue explores in detail the artistic career of Canaletto (1697–1768), Giambattista Tiepolo (1697–1770) and Giambattista Piazzetta (1682–1754), and discusses the developments of artistic trends in furniture, glass, porcelain and architecture in Venice throughout the century up to the fall of the Republic in 1797.

Elizabeth Rudy, Review of Aude Prigot, La Réception de Rembrandt à traversles estampes en France au XVIIIe siècle (2018), pp. 322–25.

The note explores the impact Rembrandt had on artists from the eighteenth through to the twenty-first century. In particular it focuses on the practice of collecting his prints in eighteenth-century France and that of copying his composition in the later part of the century. The main case studies are five French artists, among them Claude-Henri Watelet (1718–86) and Dominique Vivant-Denon (1747–1825).

Print Quarterly, June 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 20, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.2 (June 2020)

Rembrandt van Rijn, Portrait of Jan Six, 1647, etching, engraving, and drypoint, 244 × 191mm (Amsterdam: Rijksprentenkabinett).

A R T I C L E S

Antoinette Friedenthal, “Sketched, Not Etched: Jan Six and the Mariettes’ Rembrandt Oeuvre for Prince Eugene of Savoy,” pp. 140–51.

This article considers the compilation of the Rembrandt album originally produced for Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663–1736). Particular emphasis is placed on the attempts to procure a rare impression of Rembrandt’s Portrait of Jan Six. Reference to the correspondence of Jean Mariette (1660–1742) and Pierre Jean Mariette (1694–1774) on the matter and their draft catalogue reveals that the Prince’s etched Portrait of Jan Six is, in fact, a drawn copy after the print. This in turn serves to support the proposal that the Prince of Savoy’s Rembrandt album is not held in Dresden as previously thought, but instead in the Albertina in Vienna.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Helmut Gier, Review of New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Ulrich Kraus, Parts I–V, (2018–19), pp. 180–83.

The note provides an overview of the five New Hollstein volumes that bring together the corpus of Johann Ulrich Kraus (1655–1719). A prodigious printmaker and publisher, Kraus’s diverse output included commissions for various European courts, book illustrations, architectural treatises, and portraits. He is notable for sensitivity to, and amalgamation of, the latest French, Italian, Dutch, and German artistic trends.

Giorgio Marini, Review of Elisabetta Rizzioli, L’Officina di Leopoldo Cicognara: La Creazione delle Immagini per la ‘Storia della Scultura’ (2016), pp. 184–87.

Rizzioli’s book focuses on the art theorist and critic Francesco Leopoldo Cicognara (1767–1834), who “played a crucial role in the promotion of the arts from the Neoclassical period to the 1814–15 Congress of Vienna, relying on an international artistic community to which Antonio Canova (1757–1822) had introduced him.”

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Antonia Dosen, Dubravka Botica, Anamarija Stepanić, Andelika Galić, and Petra Milovac, eds., Architecture and Performance: Prints from the Cabinet of Louis XIV in the MUO Holdings, exhibition catalogue (Zagreb: Museum of Arts and Crafts, 2016), p. 204.

“With parallel Croatian and English texts, the well-illustrated Architecture and Performance is dedicated to three groups of prints that were part of the so-called Cabinet du Roi . . . the three volumes dedicated to the Louvre, the Tuileries, Versailles and the royal festivals.”

Journal18, #9 Field Notes (Spring 2020)

Posted in conferences (summary), journal articles by Editor on April 11, 2020

The ninth issue of J18 is now available (and be sure to check out the latest offerings in J18’s Notes & Queries). . .

Journal18, Issue #9: Field Notes (Spring 2020)
Issue Editor: Amy Freund

How do we understand the field of eighteenth-century art today? What are its objects of study, and how do we think, write, and teach about them? Where, and when, do we locate ‘the eighteenth century’? This issue of Journal18, emerging from a conference organized by the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) in Dallas, TX (November 2018), maps out the questions and approaches driving the field today, and proposes new directions for its future.

HECAA was established in 1993 at a vibrant moment in the evolution of the ‘new’ art history in the United States, in an effort to carve a place for the study of eighteenth-century art in a discipline that had only just begun to acknowledge it. A quarter of a century later, buoyed by a membership that had increased ten-fold and an utterly transformed publishing landscape (including the founding of Journal18), an anniversary conference was convened at an exciting but also challenging moment in the field. Hosted by the Department of Art History at Southern Methodist University, the HECAA at 25 conference convened 160 scholars of eighteenth-century art to survey its history, present current research and pedagogical initiatives, and consider possible trajectories for its future.

These Field Notes take two different forms. Four research essays by emerging scholars who presented their work at the conference—on French typefaces, Korean folding screens, British ceiling painting, and American veneer furniture—showcase new scholarly directions. A parallel roundtable discussion by conference participants brings to light the most pressing issues facing, and defining, the present and future of the field—among them the importance of place and the possibilities of a ‘global eighteenth century’, the turn toward materiality and material culture, the centrality of the work of female artists, and the impact of the digital humanities on teaching and scholarship.

Amy Freund, Southern Methodist University

A R T I C L E S

The Bignon Commission’s Measured Bodies: Inventing Typeface and Describing the Mechanical Arts under Louis XIV
Sarah Grandin

Tactile Vision in Eighteenth-Century Korean Still-Life, or Ch’aekkŏri
Irene Choi

A New Golden Age: Politics and Mural Painting at Chatsworth
Laurel O. Peterson

The Nature of American Veneer Furniture, circa 1790–1810
Jennifer Y. Chuong

R O U N D T A B L E

Reflections on HECAA at 25: A Roundtable Discussion
Jeffrey Collins, Elisabeth Fraser, Elizabeth Mansfield, Amelia Rauser, Kristel Smentek & Wendy Bellion, Paris Spies-Gans, Nancy Um, and Amy Freund

Cover image: Steel type punches of the romain du roi, Cabinet des poinçons de l’Imprimerie nationale, Douai. © Photo by Sarah Grandin.

The Burlington Magazine, March 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 30, 2020

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 162 (March 2020) — Drawings

Luigi Valadier, Pyx, 1769–71, gilt silver, 22 × 11 cm, one of eighteen pieces of a pontifical mass service belonging to the cathedral of Portalegre, Portugal (Church of S. Miguel, Castelo Branco).

A R T I C L E S

• Teresa Leonor M. Vale “A Portuguese Bishop’s Pontifical Mass Service by Luigi Valadier,” pp. 196–203. A gilt silver pontifical mass service belonging to the cathedral of Portalegre, Portugal, is here identified as the work of the celebrated Roman silversmith Luigi Valadier and dated 1769–71. It is closely similar to a contemporary service owned by Cardinal Domenico Orsini and both services can be linked to a group of drawings from Valadier’s workshop.

S H O R T E R  N O T I C E S

Kee Il Choi, Jr., “Ornament from China: Sources for a Garden Folly Design by Jean-Jacques Lequeu,” pp. 216–19.

R E V I E W S

• Kirstin Kennedy, Review of Carolina Naya Franco, Joyas y alhajas del Alto Aragón: esmaltes y piedras preciosas de ajuares y tesoros históricos (2018).

• Stéphane Loire, Review of Nicola Spinosa, ed., Francesco Solimena (1657–1747) e le Arti a Napoli (2018).

• Aileen Dawson, Review of Claudia Bodinek (with contributions by Peter Braun, Tobias Pfeifer-Helke und Claudia Schnitzer), Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre Grafischen Vorlagen (2018).

• David Bindman, Review of the exhibition Canova Thorvaldsen: The Birth of Modern Sculpture (Milan: Gallerie d’Italia, 2019–20).

• Daniel Stewart, Review of the exhibition Troy: Myth and Reality (London: British Museum, 2019–20).

• Christiane Elster, Review of the exhibition History in Fashion: 1500 Years of Embroidery in Fashion (Leipzig: GRASSI Museum of Applied Arts, 2019–20).

• Philippa Glanville, Review of the exhibition Feast and Fast: The Art of Food in Europe, 1500–1800 (Cambridge: Fitzwilliam Museum, 2019–20)

• Kamila Kocialkowska, Review of the exhibition Peter the Great: Collector, Scholar, Artist (Moscow Kremlin Museums, 2019–20).

• Eckart Marchand, Review of the exhibition Near Life: The Gipsformerei: 200 Years of Casting Plaster (Berlin: James-Simon-Galerie, 2019–20).

Print Quarterly, March 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 10, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.1 (March 2020)

Antoine Trouvain and Pierre Lepautre after Bon Boullogne, Thesis Print of François Bourgarel for Mathematics, 1695, engraving, top 336 x 540 mm, bottom 462 x 540 mm (Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France).

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

• John Roger Paas, Review of Simon Turner, ed., The New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Stridbeck the Elder and the Younger, compiled by Dieter Beaujean and based on the research material of Josef H. Biller, parts 1–4 (Ouderkerk aan den IJssel: Sound & Vision Publishers, 2018), pp. 72–73.

The fact that artists are prolific and find a market in their lifetime is no guarantee that their work will enjoy critical acclaim in the long run or be avidly sought after by collectors. Such is the case of the Stridbecks, Johann the Elder (1641–1716) and Johann the Younger (1666–1714), Augsburg printmakers active from the late seventeenth century to the second decade of the eighteenth. . . . [But] their prints help to give us a deeper understanding of the print market and of public taste at the time, and we are fortunate that the more than a thousand prints of the Stridbecks have now been carefully collected and catalogued.

• Louis Marchesano, Review of Véronique Meyer, Pour la plus grand gloire du roi: Louis XIV en theses (Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2017), pp. 73–75.

This book provides an insightful account of the thesis print phenomenon by focusing on prints dedicated to the French king. It explores the function of these prints in the candidate’s life at university and outside, the production, reception and diffusion of the sheets and analyses the king’s image and its evolution in the period from his birth in 1638 to his death in 1715.

• Niklas Leverenz, “Isidore-Stanislas Helman and J. Pélicier,” pp. 75–76.

This short note focuses on a recently discovered signature of J. Pélicier on the proof state of a 1787 print previously attributed to Isidore-Stanislas Helman (1742–1809). This evidence suggests that Helman must have relied on a team of etchers for his large body of work, unusually allowing some of them to put their name on the plates.

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

• Who is Who Chez les Colbert? La collection d’estampes de Joseph de Colbert, exhibition catalogue (Sceaux: Musée du Domaine départemental de Sceaux / Ghent: Éditions Snoeck, 2019), p. 96.

• Sandra Pisot, ed., Goya, Fragonard, Tiepolo: Die Freiheit der Malerei, exhibition catalogue (Hamburg: Hamburger Kunsthalle / Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2019), p. 96.

• Laurent Baridon, Jean-Philippe Garric, and Martial Guédron, eds., Jean-Jacques Lequeu: Bâtisseur des Fantasmes, exhibition catalogue (Paris: Petit Palais, Bibliothèque Nationale de France / Éditions Norma, 2018), p. 97.

J. Pélicier, Emperor Qianlong Welcoming the Elderly Citizens of his Empire for a Celebration in their Honour, 1787, etching, 303 x 428 mm (Private Collection).

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, March 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 6, 2020

In the latest issue of the Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies:

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 43.1 (March 2020).

A R T I C L E S

• Amanda Vickery, “Branding Angelica: Reputation Management in Late Eighteenth‐Century England,” 3–24.
• Alberto del Campo Tejedor, “The Barber of Enlightened Spain: On the Politics and Practice of Grooming a Modern Nation,” pp. 25–42.
• Ana Sáez‐Hidalgo, “Anglo‐Spanish Enlightenment: Joseph Shepherd, an English ‘ilustrado’ in Valladolid,” pp. 46–60.
• Robert W. Jones, “Elizabeth Sheridan’s Post‐Celebrity,” pp. 61–78.
• Jonathan Taylor, “‘Who Bravely Fights, and Like Achilles Bleeds’: The Ideal of the Front‐Line Soldier during the Long Eighteenth Century,” pp. 79–100.

E D I T E D  M A N U S C R I P T S

• Jessica Wen Hui Lim, “Barbauld’s Lessons: The Conversational Primer in Late Eighteenth‐Century British Children’s Literature,” 101–20.

R E V I E W S

• Madeleine Pelling, Review of Susanna Avery‐Quash and Kate Retford, eds., The Georgian London Town House: Building, Collecting and Display, pp. 121–22.
• Megan Kitching, Review of Keith Michael Baker and Jenna Gibbs, eds., Life Forms in the Thinking of the Long Eighteenth Century, pp. 122–24.
• Charlotte Fletcher, Review of Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux, The Pocket: A Hidden History of Women’s Lives, 1660–1900, pp. 124–25.
• Hannah Hutchings‐Georgiou, Review of Andrew Carpenter, ed., The Poems of Olivia Elder, pp. 125–26.
• Thomas Lalevée, Review of Gabriel Galice and Christophe Miqueu, eds., Rousseau, la république, la paix: actes du colloque du GIPRI (Grand‐Saconnex, 2012), pp. 126–28.
• Helen Metcalfe, Review of Sally Holloway, The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture, pp. 128–29.
• Olive Baldwin Thelma Wilson, Review of Berta Joncus, Kitty Clive, or The Fair Songster, pp. 129–31.
• Joachim Whaley, Review of Claudia Keller, Lebendiger Abglanz: Goethes Italien‐Projekt als Kulturanalyse, pp. 131–32.
• Ben Wilkinson‐Turnbull, Review of A. C. Elias, John Irwin Fischer, and Panthea Reid, eds., Jonathan Swift’s Word‐Book: A Vocabulary Compiled for Esther Johnson and Copied in Her Own Hand, pp. 132–33.
• Max Skjönsberg, Review of Margaret Watkins, The Philosophical Progress of Hume’s Essays, pp. 133–35.

The Burlington Magazine, February 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on February 28, 2020

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 162 (February 2020) — Northern European Art

Anton von Maron, Portrait of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, 1767, oil on canvas, 136 × 99 cm (Weimar: Stadtschloss).

E D I T O R I A L

• “The National Trust at 125,” p. 87.

A R T I C L E S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “A Bavarian Pilgrimage Shrine in Seventeenth-Century Paraguay,” pp. 115–25. The Jesuit priest Anton Sepp was one of the first Germanic missionaries to be admitted to the Spanish territories in South America. Arriving in 1691, he brought with him a copy of the miracle-working sculpture of the Virgin of Altötting in Bavaria, and in 1697 he emphasised the German character of his mission by commissioning a version of the octagonal chapel in which the original was housed.

• Clare Hornsby, “J. J. Winckelmann and the Society of Antiquaries of London: New Documents,” pp. 126–35. Three new documents in the archive of the Society of Antiquaries, published here for the first time, provide evidence about Winckelmann’s aspirations for promoting his works in antiquarian circles in England. They include the first statement in English of his theory of art history, written in 1761.

R E V I E W S

• Arthur Wheelock, Review of the exhibition De Wind is Op!: Climate, Culture and Innovation in Dutch Maritime Painting (New Bedford Whaling Museum, 2019–20), pp. 150–52.

• Olivier Bonfait, Review of Gaëtane Maës, De l’expertise artistique à la vulgarisation au siècle des Lumières: Jean-Baptiste Descamps (1715–1791) et la peinture flamande, hollandaise et allemande (Brepols, 2016), pp. 171–72.

• Anna Arabindan Kesson, Review of Sarah Thomas, Witnessing Slavery: Art and Travel in the Age of Abolition (Yale University Press, 2019), pp. 172–74.