Enfilade

Print Quarterly, June 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 16, 2022

Hippolyte Pochon, Du Courage ! En avant Marche (Courage, forward march!), 1815, hand-coloured etching, 23 × 31cm
(Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale)

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The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.2 (June 2022)

Antony Griffiths, “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815, Part II.”

Part II of Antony Griffiths’ article on “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815” discusses the numerous new names, found only in these years, who deposited prints giving their surname and address. Most of these were the actual producers, and many of the most frequent names can be identified. The article turns to each of the main artists individually, many of whom were leading figures in the school of Jacques Louis David. They included Louis François Charon, Gautier, Charles François Gabriel Levachez, Pierre Audouin, Pierre Marie Bassompierre Gaston, Charles Marie Dubois-Maisonneuve, Pierre Lacroix, Louis Félix Legendre, Jean Jacques Théodore Sauvé, Desalle, Charles Elie, Michael Raphael Vautier and Hippolyte Pochon, whose work was particularly well-executed and imaginative.

 The issue also includes these relevant reviews:

Johann Georg Edlinger (1741–1819)

Hans Jakob Meier, Review of Brigitte Huber, Georg Edlinger: Porträts ohne Schmeichelei (Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2021), p. 194.

Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces

Nadine Orenstein, Review of Sam Segal and Klara Alen, Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces: Paintings, Drawings and Prints up to the Nineteenth Century (Leiden: Brill and Hes & De Graaf, 2020), p. 226.

The Burlington Magazine, May 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 13, 2022

The eighteenth century in the May issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (May 2022)

E D I T O R I A L

• “The Rustat Memorial,” p. 443.

When the statue of Edward Colston was defaced and thrown into Bristol harbour on 7th June 2020 the resulting publicity was so enormous that it seemed likely that a wholesale assault on memorials to men who took part in the slave trade or were racist would inevitably follow. In fact, remarkably little has happened. . . .

Little more has been done in the case of church monuments. . . . Only one such case is outstanding, an application by St Peter’s church, Dorchester, to move a late eighteenth-century wall memorial to the slave owner John Gordon from the church to Dorchester Museum. If such an application is contested the matter is referred to the judgment of a diocesan Chancellor in a Consistory Court. This was the result of the ecclesiastical case that has attracted most attention, the application by the Master and governing body of Jesus College, Cambridge, to remove the monument to Tobias Rustat (1608–94) from the college chapel, which was opposed by a group of former members of the college. The case was heard in February by David R. Hodge, Deputy Chancellor of the Diocese of Ely, who in March dismissed the application. Last month the college announced that it would not appeal against his decision. . .

A R T I C L E S

• Antoinette Friedenthal, “Prince Eugene of Savoy’s Rembrandt Drawings: A Newly Discovered Provenance,” pp. 450–61.

• Pascal-François Bertrand and Charissa Bremer David, “Paintings in Beauvais Tapestry, 1764–67,” pp. 462–72. In 1764, at a time when the Royal Tapestry Manufactory at Beauvais was short of work, its directors, Laurent and André Charlemagne Charron, initiated the weaving of small tapestry panels based on designs by François Boucher. Intended as inexpensive, independent works of art, they were in essence a short-lived marketing venture. Records of their weaving in the firm’s payment registers allow a number of surviving examples to be identified.

• Sofya Dmitrieva, “Carle Van Loo at the 1737 Salon,” pp. 473–77. Although not pendants in the traditional sense, since they were painted for different patrons, it is argued here that Carle Van Loo’s A Pasha Having His Mistress’s Portrait Painted and The Grand Turk Giving a Concert to His Mistress, shown at the Salon of 1737, were meant to be read as a pair|—as portraits of the artist and his wife and as allegories of Painting and Music. By linking the paintings, Van Loo, may have intended them to make a statement on the changing relations between art and patronage.

R E V I E W S

• Duncan Robinson, Review of Susan Sloman, Gainsborough in London (Modern Art Press, 2021), pp. 478–85.

• Satish Padiyar, Review of the exhibition Jacques-Louis David: Radical Draftsman (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2022), pp. 492–95.

• Kee Il Choi, Jr., Review of the exhibition Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Wallace Collection, and The Huntington, 2022–23), pp. 504–07.

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the re-installation of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Venetian paintings at the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice (from August 2021), pp. 507–09.

• Stefania Girometti, Review of Joachim Jacoby, Städels Erbe: Meisterzeichnungen aus der Sammlung des Stifters (Sandstein Verlag, 2020), pp. 529–30. Comprehensive analysis of “the collection of drawings assembled by Johann Friedrich S (1728–1816), the founder of the art institute and museum in Frankfurt that bears his name.”

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of the exhibition catalogue Watteau at Work: La Surprise (Getty, 2021), pp. 530–31.

• Hugo Chapman, Review of Cristiana Romalli, Cento Disegni dalla Collezione della Fondazione Marco Brunelli (Ugo Bozzi, 2020), pp. 531–32.

The Burlington Magazine, April 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 18, 2022

The eighteenth century in the April issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (April 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucy Davis and Natalia Muñoz-Rojas, “The Provenance of Het Steen and The Rainbow Landscape by Rubens,” pp. 333–41. New documentary evidence elucidates the hitherto uncertain history of these two celebrated landscapes painted by Peter Paul Rubens ca. 1636. Having remained with this family after his death, they were purchased by the Marquess of Caracena, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and taken to Madrid. By 1706 they were in Genoa, in the collections of successively Bartolomeo Saluzzo (1652–1705) and Costantino Balbi (d. 1740). This article assimilates a number of archival discoveries that shed light not only on the provenance of these two paintings but also on two important Genoese collections.

• Lucia Bonazzi, “Richard Vickris Pryor in the Art Market of Napoleonic Europe,” pp. 342–49. The son of a Quaker family of brewers and wine merchants, Richard Vickris Pryor (1780–1807) spent his brief adult life in pursuit of paintings. A characteristic example of the sort of entrepreneur who sought to exploit the release of works of art onto the market in the wake of Napoleon’s campaigns, he scored his greatest success with the purchase of the Lechi collection in Brescia in 1802.

• Margaret Oppenheimer, “From Paris to New York: French Paintings from the Collection of Eliza Jumel,” pp. 350–61. Eliza Jumel (1775–1865), born in poverty, was one of New York’s richest women at her death in 1865. While in Paris in 1815–17 she formed the largest collection of European paintings yet assembled by an American, the largest part of them French. Sold in 1821, the collection has been all but forgotten, but it has proved possible to trace a number of the works she owned.

R E V I E W S

• Noémi Duperron, Review of the exhibition Le Théâtre de Troie: Antoine Coypel, d’Homère à Virgile (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 2022), pp. 394–96.
• Eric Zafran, Review of the exhibition Paintings on Stone: Science and the Sacred, 1530–1800 (Saint Louis Art Museum, 2022), pp. 396–99.
• Peter Y. K. Lam, Review of the exhibition catalogue Sarah Wong and Stacey Pierson, eds., Collectors, Curators, Connoisseurs: A Century of the Oriental Ceramic Society, 1921–2021 (Oriental Ceramic Society, 2021), pp. 402–03.
• Rowan Watson, Review of Richard Rouse and Mary Rouse, Renaissance Illuminators in Paris: Artists and Artisans, 1500–1715 (Harvey Miller, 2019), pp. 418–19.
• Richard Wrigley, Review of Iris Moon and Richard Taws, eds., Time, Media, and Visuality in Post-Revolutionary France (Bloomsbury, 2021), pp. 423–24.
• Philip Ward-Jackson Review of Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Neue Pinakothek: Katalog der Skulpturen; Volume I: Die Sammlung Ludwigs I, Volume II: Adolf von Hildebrand (Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), pp. 424–25. “This is a vital link in the chain between Enlightenment celebrations of worthies and grand hommes and such later nineteenth-century sculptural pantheons as those on the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the Albert Memorial, London . . .” (424).

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary for Jonathan Brown (1939–2022), pp. 427–28. As well as bringing many fresh insights to the study of the major Spanish artists from El Greco to Picasso, with a particular focus on Velázquez, Jonathan Brown made important contributions to the study of patronage and collecting and of the diffusion of the images and ideas in the wider Hispanic world. Much honoured in Spain as well as in his native America, he will also be remembered as a dedicated and assiduous teacher.

The Burlington Magazine, February 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on March 31, 2022

The eighteenth century in February’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (February 2022) — Northern European Art

Nathaniel Dance Holland, Portrait of Christian VII, King of Denmark, 1768, oil on canvas, 77 × 63 cm (Royal Collection Trust).

A R T I C L E S

• Sara Ayres, “Christian VII of Denmark’s Lost British Portraits,” pp. 155–63. In 1768–69 the young Christian VII of Denmark visited London and Paris, where several portraits of him were painted. Three were by artists born or working in Britain—Angelica Kauffmann, Edward Cunningham, known as Calze, and Matthew Peters. All are now lost, but evidence about the comissions survives in copies and prints, contemporary descriptions and documents in the Danish State Archives.

• Lars Hendrikman, “The Finding of the Infant Bacchus,” pp. 180–83.

R E V I E W S

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the exhibition Venetia 1600: Births and Rebirths (Venice: Palazza Ducale, 2021–22), pp. 190–92.

• Ivan Gaskell, Review of the new galleries of Dutch and Flemish art at the MFA Boston (open from November 2021), pp. 195–98.

• Richard Stemp, Review of the exhibition Hogarth and Europe (London: Tate Britain, 2021–22), pp. 198–200.

• Maryl Gensheimer, Review of Fabio Barry, Painting in Stone: Architecture and the Poetics of Marble from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (Yale UP, 2020), pp. 216–17.

• Clare Hornsby, Review of Ortwin Dally, Maria Gazzetti, and Arnold Nesselrath, eds., Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717–1768): Ein Europ isches Rezeptionsph nomen / Fenomeno Europeo della Ricezione (Michael Imhof Verlag, 2021), pp. 217–18.

• Robert Skwirblies, Review of Lea Kuhn, Gemalte Kunstgeschichte: Bildgenealogien in der Malerei um 1800 (Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2020), pp. 218–19.

• Thomas Stammers, Review of Stacey Boldrick, Iconoclasm and the Museum (Routledge, 2020), p. 222.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Marjorie Trusted, “Christian Theuerkauff (1936–2021),” pp. 223–24. For many years Deputy Director of the sculpture collection at the Bode Museum, Berlin, and honorary professor at the city’s Free University, Christian Theuerkauff was a leading scholar of Baroque ivories, whose expert connosseurship and archival research definitively shaped our understanding of many of the outstanding sculptors in the medium.

 

Print Quarterly, March 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 12, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.1 (March 2022) . .

Charles Elie, T[alma] donnant une leçon de grâce et de dignité impériale (T[alma] giving a lesson in grace and imperial dignity), 1814, hand-coloured etching, 244 x 142 mm (London: British Museum).

A R T I C L E S

Antony Griffiths, “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815, Part I: The Established Printsellers, Genty and Martinet,” pp. 31ff.

Two articles by Antony Griffiths on ‘The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815’—Part 1 in the March 2022 issue and Part 2 forthcoming—discuss the publication of caricatures in Paris during two years in which there were four regimes in power, and two occupations by foreign armies—a period which led to an unprecedented outpouring of social and political satire. Many works of great quality were produced, but most have only a title and do not reveal the names of the producers. The articles discuss how publishers and artists dealt with the political upheavals and identify some of the many participants who entered the field in these years. Part 1 deals with the caricatures published by members of the established print trade in Paris, and in particular Aaron Martinet and the newcomer Genty, who has previously been misidentified.

R E V I E W S

• Mark McDonald, Review of Juan Agustín Ceán Bermúdez, El Churriguerismo: discurso inédito (Alicante: Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2019), p. 79.

• Diana Greenwald, Review of Madeleine Viljoen, Nina Dubin and Meredith Martin, Meltdown! Picturing the World’s First Bubble Economy (Turnhout: Harvey Miller, 2020), p. 80.

• Ann V. Gunn, Review of John Bonehill, Anne Dulau Beveridge, and Nigel Leask, eds., Old Ways New Roads: Travels in Scotland 1720–1832 (Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2021), p. 81.

• Marcia Reed, Review of Troy Bickham, Eating the Empire: Food and Society in Eighteenth-Century Britain (London: Reaktion, 2020), p. 84.

• Nigel Tattersfield, Review of Graham Williams, Thomas Bewick Engraver & the Performance of Woodblocks (Kent: Florin Press, 2021), p. 86.

• Janis A. Tomlinson, Review of Mark McDonald et al., Goya’s Graphic Imagination (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2021), p. 102.

Print Quarterly, December 2021

Posted in books, exhibitions, reviews by Editor on December 8, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2021) . . .

Matthew Darly, The Flower Garden, 1777, etching and engraving with watercolour, 35 × 25 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Elizabeth L. Block, Review of Luigi Amara, The Wig: A Hairbrained History, translated by Christina MacSweeney (Reaktion Books, 2020), p. 436.

Elizabeth Block gives an overview of the 33 brief chapters of Luigi Amara’s The Wig: A Hairbrained History. The chapter “Towering Hairdos” looks at the expensive and impractical styles of wigs in the years before the French Revolution, whilst “Dressing Up Justice” focuses on William Hogarth’s The Bench, 1758–64, an engraving depicting bewigged magistrates. Block praises this work for its entertaining and enjoyable qualities, but highlights its lack of academic rigour, suggesting at the end works to turn to for a more scholarly treatment of the subject.

Richard Taws, Review of the exhibition catalogue William Blake, edited by Martin Myrone and Amy Concannon (Tate, 2019), p. 438.

Reviewing the catalogue for the exhibition William Blake, held at Tate Britain in 2019–20, Richard Taws discusses the book’s five chapters covering the artist’s early artistic milieu, his career as printmaker, his relationship with patronage and display, and his reclamation by a younger generation of artists. It is noted that in the authors’ attempt to demythologise Blake, they are successful in creating a “Blake for all,” who satisfies both a specialist and popular audience.

The Burlington Magazine, September 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on September 29, 2021

The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (September 2021)

E D I T O R I A L

• “Nicholas Goodison and The Burlington,” p. 779.

A R T I C L E S

• David Pullins, Dorothy Mahon, Silvia A. Centeno, “The Lavoisiers by David: Technical Findings on Portraiture at the Brink of Revolution,” pp. 780–91.
Recent technical examination of Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Antoine-Laurent and Marie-Anne Lavoisier in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, painted between 1787 and 1788, has revealed significant and previously unknown alterations that transform our understanding of this celebrated portrait, its author, and its sitters.

R E V I E W S

• Susan Babaie, Review of the exhibition Epic Iran (V&A, 2021), pp. 837–39.

• Jonathan Conlin, Review of the exhibition Creating a National Collection: The Partnership between Southampton City Art Gallery and the National Gallery (Southampton City Art Gallery, 2021), pp. 845–48.

• Tanya Harrod, Review of the newly renovated Museum of the Home (previously the Geffrye Museum), pp. 858–61.

• John Bold, Review of John Martin Robinson, Wilton House: The Art, Architecture, and Interiors of One of Britain’s Great Stately Homes (Rizzoli Electa, 2021), pp. 872–74.

• Simon Lee, Review of Janis Tomlinson, Goya: A Portrait of the Artist (Princeton UP, 2020), pp. 874–75.

• Peter Fuhring, Review of Elena Cooper, Art and Modern Copyright: The Contested Image (Cambridge UP, 2018), pp. 875–76.

O B I T U A R Y

• Simon Jervis, “Ronald Lightbown (1932–2021),” pp. 879–80.
Spending most of his career at the Victoria and Albert Museum and National Art Library, Ronald Lightbown was a scholar of exceptional breadth, whose publications ranged from goldsmiths’ work of the late Middle Ages to Renaissance art and from the history of jewellery to Baroque wax sculpture.

 

Print Quarterly, September 2021

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 18, 2021

Gottfried August Gründler, Frontispiece Der Naturforscher (1774), engraving, 90 × 110 mm
(Cambridge University Library)

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.3 (September 2021)

William Pether, Eye Miniature, 1817, watercolour on ivory, embedded in red velvet, 27 × 22 mm (London: Victoria & Albert Museum).

A R T I C L E S

Dominika Cora, “New Light on the Life and Work of the Mezzotint Engraver William Pether (1739–1821)”

William Pether (1739–1821) was one of the most distinguished English mezzotint engravers in the second half of the eighteenth century. Responding to scholarly confusion around his life, this article presents archival discoveries that illuminate his biography and personal life, as well as unpublished drawings and an overview of his artistic output.

N O T E S

Anna Gielas, “Gottfried A. Gründler’s Der Naturforscher (1773)”

During the second half of the eighteenth century, there was a peak in the usage of elaborate frontispiece engravings for European naturalist periodicals. Gielas introduces the frontispiece created by the renowned German engraver Gottfried August Gründler (1710–1775) for the naturalist journal Der Naturforscher and examines the useful information it displayed to the periodical’s (potential) audience. The engraving can be seen as an illustration of the cultural identity of naturalists as well as the Enlightened individual in the later decades of the eighteenth century.

The Burlington Magazine, June 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 28, 2021

Charles-Louis Clérisseau, Traou en Dalmathia, 1757
(Paris: Bibliothèque nationale de France)

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The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (June 2021) — Works of Art on Paper

A R T I C L E S

• Ana Šverko, “Clérisseau’s Journey to Dalmatia: A Newly Attributed Collection of Drawings,” pp. 492–502.
A collection of 136 hitherto anonymous drawings of Italy, Istria and Dalmatia in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, is here attributed to Charles-Louis Clérisseau. The drawings, which include a group made during his journey from Venice to Diocletian’s Palace in Split with Robert Adam in 1757, further expand our understanding of Clérisseau as the forerunner of a new generation of traveller-painters.

• Tony Barnard, “Trading in Art: Antonio Cesare di Poggi (1744–1836),” pp. 492–502.
With the help of his English wife, Hester, the Italian artist A.C. Poggi forged a career in London as a portrait painter, a retailer of fans, a dealer principally in drawings and publisher of prints. Poggi’s successes and failures reflect changing fashions and fortunes in the capital’s competitive art world between his arrival in England c.1770 and departure for the Continent in 1801.

• Christopher White, “Reminiscences of the British Museum Print Room, 1954–65,” pp. 492–502.
The author’s first job, as Assistant Keeper with responsibility for the Northern schools in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, London, introduced him to a distinguished group of curators and an occasionally eccentric band of visitors. The department’s focus was emphatically on drawings, where major acquisitions could be made by sharp-eyed scholars in the salesrooms.

Fan portraying George III and his family at the Royal Academy of Arts exhibition in 1788, made by A.C. Poggi incorporating a print by Pietro Antonio Martini after J. H. Ramberg, ca. 1790, engraved and hand-coloured paper with carved and pierced ivory sticks and guards, width when open 38.4 cm (London: Victoria and Albert Museum, T.56-1933).

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R E V I E W S

• Elizabeth Pergam, “The Frick Reframed,” pp. 536–39. On the plain, grey walls of the Modernist Breuer building, New York, some of the most famous works from the Frick Collection shine in a new light.

• Yuriko Jackall, Review of the exhibition catalogue Une des Provinces du Rococo: La Chine Rêvée de François Boucher, ed. by Yohan Rimaud and Alastair Laing (In Fine éditions d’art and Musée des beaux-arts et d’archéologie de Besançon, 2019), pp. 539–41.

• Jonathan Yarker, Review of the exhibition Turner’s Modern World (Tate Britain, 2020–21), pp. 541–44.

• Amanda Dotseth, Review of the exhibition publication Museo del Prado 1819–2019: Un lugar de memoria, ed. by Javier Portús et al (Prado, 2018), pp. 546–49.

• Simonetta Prosperi Valenti Rodinò, Review of Les dessins de la collection Mariette: Écoles italienne et espagnole, by Pierre Rosenberg et al, 4 vols., (Somogy, 2019), pp. 550–51.

• Oliver Tostmann, Review of Die Zeichnungen des Giovan Battista Beinaschi aus der Sammlung der Kunstakademie Düsseldorf am Kunstpalast, ed. by Sonja Brink and Francesco Grisolia (Imhof Verlag, 2020), pp. 556–57. [Beinaschi lived between 1636 and 1688, but Tostmann notes in passing points of his eighteenth-century reception.]

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of L’ Art et la manière: Dessins français du XVIIIesiècle des musées de Marseille, ed. by Luc Georget and Gérard Fabre (Silvana Editoriale, 2019), pp. 557–58.

Woman’s Art Journal, Spring / Summer 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 21, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of WAJ:

Woman’s Art Journal 42.1 (Spring / Summer 2021)

Marguerite Gérard, Portrait of a Man and Woman in an Interior, 1818 (Tulsa: Philbrook Museum of Art; Taber Art Fund, 2019.9). The painting sold at Christie’s in Paris on 28 October 2019, Sale 17655, Lot 751.

A R T I C L E S

• Sarah Lees, “Marguerite Gérard’s Portrait of a Man and a Woman in an Interior: Portraiture, Landscape, and Social Networks,” pp. 19–26.
• Alison M. Kettering, “Watercolor and Women in the Early Modern Netherlands: Between Mirror and Comb,” pp. 27–35.

R E V I E W S

• Rosie Razzall, Review of Angela Oberer, The Life and Work of Rosalba Carriera (1673–1757): The Queen of Pastel (Amsterdam University Press, 2020), pp. 44–46.
• Wendy Wassyng Roworth, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Angelica Kauffman, edited by Bettina Baumgärtel (Hirmer, 2020), pp. 46–48.

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