Enfilade

Print Quarterly, September 2017

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on August 20, 2017

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

John Baptist Jackson, Lamentation over the Body of Christ, ca. 1740–44, woodcut with embossing (London: The British Museum).

Print Quarterly 34.3 (September 2017)

A R T I C L E S
• Evelyn Wöldicke, “John Baptist Jackson’s Woodcuts and the Question of Embossing,” pp. 298–310.
• Freyda Spira, “Micrographic Allegories by Johann Michael Püchler and Matthias Buchinger,” pp. 310–16.

R E V I E W S
• Adriano Aymonino, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Maria Rosaria Nappi, ed., Immagini per il Grand Tour: L’attività della Stamperia Reale Borbonica (Edizioni Scientifiche Italiane, 2015), pp. 328–31.
• Rolf Reichardt, Review of Philippe de Carbonnières, La Grande Aarmée de papier: Caricatures napoléoniennes (Presses Universitaires de Rouen et du Havre, 2015), pp. 331–33.
• Perrin Stein, Review of Kristel Smentek, Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Ashgate, 2014), pp. 340–44.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Burlington Magazine, August 2017

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on August 11, 2017

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 159 (August 2017)

E D I T O R I A L

• “Reflected Glory: University Art Collections in Britain,” p. 599.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Simon Jervis, “Rudolf Hermann Wackernagel (1933–2017),” p. 639. His great article, “Carlton House Mews: The State Coach of the Prince of Wales and of the Later Kings of Hanover, A Study in the Late-Eighteenth-Century ‘Mystery’ of Coach-Building, in Furniture History 31 (1995) remains the most authoritative statement on London coach building in the late eighteenth century. But his crowning achievement was the massive two-volume Staats- und Galawagen der Wittelsbacher (Stuttgart, 2002). This is a catalogue of the wonderful collection of the Marstallmuseum at Schloss Nymphenburg, outside Munich, where he generously deposited part of his own extensive and systematic archive on coaches and carriages…

R E V I E W S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of Christine Casey, Making Magnificence: Architects, Stuccatori and the Eighteenth-Century Interior (Yale University Press, 2017), pp. 642–43.
• Ayla Lepine, Review of Julian Holder and Elizabeth McKellar, eds., Neo-Georgian Architecture, 1880–1970: A Reappraisal (Historic England, 2016), pp. 643–44.
• Michael Hall, Review of Pauline Prévost-Marcilhacy, ed., Les Rothschild: une dynastie de mécènes en France, 1873–2016 (Somogy éditions d’Art, 2016), pp. 644–46.
• Francis Russell, Review of the exhibition Canaletto and the Art of Venice (London: The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, 2017), pp. 651–52.
• Matthi Forrer, Review of the exhibition Hokusai: Beyond the Great Wave (London, The British Museum; and Osaka: Abeno Harukas Art Museum, 2017), pp. 652–53.
•Eric Zafran, Review of the exhibition America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting (Washington: D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 2017), pp. 669–70.

R E C E N T  A C Q U I S I T I O N S

Recent acquisitions (2007–17) by regional university collections in Britain

Joshua Reynolds, Maria Marow Gideon and Her Brother, William, 1786–87 (Birmingham: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts), January 2013.

Rosalba Carriera, Portrait of Gustavus Hamilton, 2nd Viscount Boyne, ca. 1730–31; pastel, heightened with white bodycolour on paper (Birmingham: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts), 2009.

John Opie, The Death of Archbishop Sharpe, 1797; oil on canvas (University of St Andrews), 2008.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Burlington Magazine, July 2017

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on July 27, 2017

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 159 (July 2017), Decorative Arts

E D I T O R I A L

• “Furniture History: The Digital Future,” p. 519.
On the eve of the 300th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Chippendale in 2018, the editorial addresses the British and Irish Furniture Makers Online Project (BIFMO), which updates the The Dictionary of English Furniture Makers 1660–1840, edited by Geoffrey Beard and Christopher Gilbert and published by the Furniture History Society in 1986. The BIFMO—a collaboration between the FHS and the Centre for Metropolitan History (CMH) at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London—is an open-access searchable database of all the entries from The Dictionary, together with the names of furniture makers from Laurie Lindey’s recent PhD thesis (Lindey, as a post-doctoral research fellow is overseeing the project at the IHR with Mark Merry of the CMH). The first phase of the BIFMO’s launch is scheduled for 30 September.

A R T I C L E S

• Koenraad Brosens and Astrid Slegten, “Creativity and Disruption in Brussels Tapestry, 1698–1706: New Data on Jan van Orley and Judocus de Vos,” pp. 528–35.
• Francesco Morena, “The Emperor of Mexico’s Screen: Maximilian I’s ‘Biombo’ in Trieste,” pp. 536–43.

R E V I E W S

• Simonetta Prosperi Valenti Rodinò, Review of Sabina de Cavi, ed., Dibujos y ornamento: Trazas y Dibujos de Artes decorativas entre Portugal, España, Italia, Malta y Grecia: Estudio en honor de Fuensanta García de la Torre (De Luca Editori d’Arte, 2015), pp. 559–60.
• Pierre Terjanian, Review of A. V. B. Norman and Ian Eaves, Arms & Armour in the Collection of Her Majesty The Queen, European Armour (Royal Collection Trust, 2016),” pp. 560–61.
• Robin Hildyard, Review of Brian Gallagher, Barbara Stone Perry, Letitia Roberts, Diana Edwards, Pat Halfpenny, Maurice Hillis and Margaret Ferris Zimmerman, British Ceramics, 1675–1825: The Mint Museum (D. Giles, 2015), pp. 561–62.
• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of Christopher M.S. Johns, China and the Church: Chinoiserie in Global Context (University of California Press, 2016) and Marco Musillo, The Shining Inheritance: Italian Painters at the Qing Court, 1699–1812 (Getty Publications, 2016),” pp. 562–63.
• Philippa Glanville, Review of James Rothwell, Silver for Entertaining: The Ickworth Collection (Philip Wilson, 2017), pp. 563–64.
• Humphrey Wine, Review of the exhibition Le Baroque des Lumières: Chefs-d’œuvre des églises parisiennes au XVIIIe siècle (Paris: Petit Palais, 2017), pp. 572–73.
• Patrick Bade, Review of the exhibition La Quête de la ligne: Trois siècles de dessin en Allemagne (Hamburg: Kunsthalle, 2016 and Paris: Fondation Custodia, 2017), pp. 574–75.
• Jamie Mulherron, Review of the exhibition Marie Madeleine: La Passion révélée (Bourg-en-Bresse: Monastère Royal de Brou; Carcassonne: Musée des Beaux Arts; and Douai: Musée de la Chartreuse, 2017), pp. 577–79.
• Elsje van Kessel, Review of the newly refurbished gallery of Portuguese painting and sculpture at the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga (MNAA), pp. 579–80.
• Philippe Bordes, Review of the exhibition Charles Percier: Architecture and Design in an Age of Revolutions (New York, Bard Graduate Center Gallery; and Château de Fontainebleau, 2016–17), pp. 583–84.

Judocus de Vos, after Lambert de Hondt, Lucas Achtschellinck, and Jan van Orley, Naval Battle from the Art of War series, ca. 1715–20; wool and silk, 344 × 400 cm (Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum).

Save

Save

Save

Print Quarterly, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 23, 2017

The current issue of Print Quarterly includes several items relevant to the long eighteenth century:

Print Quarterly 34.2 (June 2017)

Philibert-Louis Debucourt, National Almanac Dedicated to the Friends of the Constitution, 1790, aquatint and etching, 42.5 × 33.5 cm (Paris, Archives Nationales).

A R T I C L E S
• Lucia Simonato, “Cornelis Bloemaerts’s Estate Inventory and his Final Years,” pp. 150–61.

N O T E S
• Deborah L. Crohn, “Festival Prints (The Edible Monument),” pp. 199–201.
• Elmer Kolfin, “Coloured Prints (Afsetters en meester–afsetters: De kunst van het kleuren 1480–1720),” pp. 203–05.
• Deborah Howard, “Lost in Translation: Reinterpretation of Architectural Treatises (Traduire l’architecture),” pp. 207–09.
• Christiane Wiebel, “Karoline Luise von Baden as Collector,” pp. 209–11.
• John E. Moore, “Piranesi’s Published Books,” pp. 211–14.
• Kristel Smentek, “Ephemera in Revolutionary France (The Politics of the Provisional),” pp. 214–16.
• Martin Myrone, “William Blake (1757–1827),” pp. 217–18.
• Katarina Klaric, “Adam Buck (1759–1833),” pp. 218–21.

R E V I E W S
• Sheila O’Connell, “The Land of Cockayne and the Joys of Matrimony,” pp. 231–34.

A full contents list is available here»

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Journal of Art Historiography, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 6, 2017

Selection of articles from the current issue of the Journal of Art Historiography most relevant to the eighteenth century:

Journal of Art Historiography 16 (June 2017)

The Limits of Connoisseurship: Guest Edited by Valérie Kobi

Valérie Kobi (Bielefeld University), “The Limits of Connoisseurship: Attribution Issues and Mistakes, An Introduction.”

David Pullins (The Frick Collection), “The Individual’s Triumph: The Eighteenth-Century Consolidation of Authorship and Art Historiography.”

Portuguese Art Historiography

Edward J. Sullivan (New York University), “Portuguese Art History: A View from North America.”

Foteini Vlachou (Instituto de História Contemporânea, Lisbon), “The Discourse on Utility: Art Theory in Eighteenth-Century Portugal.”

Reviews

Ingrid R. Vermeulen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam), Review of Kristel Smentek, Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Ashgate, 2014).

 

Art History, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on May 23, 2017

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Art History:

Art History 40.3 (June 2017)

A R T I C L E S

Louis-Michel Van Loo, Carle Van Loo and His Family, 1757; oil on canvas, 200 × 156 cm (Musée National du Château de Versailles).

• Emma Barker, ” ‘No Picture More Charming’: The Family Portrait in Eighteenth-Century France,” pp. 526–53.

During the eighteenth century, so it is conventionally argued, the family portrait underwent a decisive transformation. Hitherto stiff and formal, such pictures took on a new informality and intimacy in response to the rise of a new set of domestic ideals. In the case of French family portraiture, this narrative has continued to be rehearsed in a largely uncritical way. What has not been adequately grasped to date is the way that such pictures functioned to legitimate the sitters and, more particularly, the male head of the family in the eyes of an external beholder. Although sometimes commissioned by a royal or noble family in response to a dynastic crisis, they most often functioned to consolidate the social ascent of wealthy commoners. The changes that the family portrait underwent during this period are bound up with the shift of political authority away from the absolute monarch towards the public sphere.

R E V I E W S

• Michael Schreffler, Review of Ananda Cohen Suarez, Heaven, Hell, and Everything in Between: Murals of the Colonial Andes (University of Texas Press, 2016), pp. 672–74.

• T. A. Heslop, Review of Christy Anderson, Anne Dunlop, and Pamela H. Smith, eds., The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logics, c. 1250–1750 (Manchester University Press, 2014), pp. 681–82.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Burlington Magazine, April 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on April 29, 2017

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 159 (April 2017)

AR T I C L E S
• Susan M. Wager, “The Earliest Known Version of Madame de Pompadour’s Suite d’Estampes Rediscovered,” pp. 285–89.
• Elizabeth Darrow, “The Art of Conservation: X Pietro Edwards: The Restorer as Philosophe,” pp. 308–17.

R E V I E W S
• Owen Hopkins, Review of Angelo Hornak, After the Fire: London Churches in the Age of Wren, Hooke, Hawksmoore, and Gibbs (Pimpernel Press, 2016), pp. 323–24.
• Giles Waterfield, Review of Burton Fredericksen, The Burdens of Wealth: Paul Getty and His Museum (Archway Publishing, 2015), p. 325.
• Teresa Leonor M. Vale, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Alvar Gonzalez Palacios, I Valadier: L’album dei disegni del museo napoleonico (Museo Napoleonico di Roma, 2015), p. 328.
• Richard Green, Review of Stephen Lloyd, ed., Art, Animals and Politics: Knowsley and the Earls of Derby (Unicorn Press, 2015), p. 328.

Save

Print Quarterly, March 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on April 20, 2017

Antoine Masson, after Titian, Supper at Emmaus, second half of the seventeenth century, engraving, 452 x 586 mm
(London: The British Museum).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Foremost among the several items in the current issue of Print Quarterly relevant to the eighteenth century is an article by Thomas Frangenberg addressing Franz Christoph von Scheyb (1704–77) on the art of engraving. Von Scheyb’s unusual detailed discussion of a print by Antoine Masson (1636–1700) after Titian demonstrates the sophistication with which aspects of reproductive prints could be articulated during this period, revealing prints’ merits and shortcomings, both as sources of art history and works of art in their own right. The issue also includes shorter reviews on books about Tiepolo, Piazzetta, and Novelli in the context of the eighteenth-century Venetian illustrated book; drawings and prints after the antique; and prints by Luigi Rossini (1790–1857).

Print Quarterly 34.1 (March 2017)

A R T I C L E S
• Thomas Frangenberg, “Franz Christoph von Scheyb on the Art of Engraving,” pp. 32–41

N O T E S
• Viccy Coltman, “Drawn from the Antique: Artists & the Classical Ideal,” pp. 70–72.
• Giorgio Marini, “Book Illustration in Eighteenth-Century Venice (Tiepolo, Piazzetta, Novelli: L’incanto del libro illustrato nel Settecento Veneto), pp. 73–76.
• David R. Marshall, “Luigi Rossini 1790–1857,” pp. 76–77.

A full contents list is available here»

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Burlington Magazine, December 2016

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 22, 2016

The eighteenth century in The Burlington (the issue is dedicated to ‘Art in Britain’):

201612-coverThe Burlington Magazine 158 (December 2016)

A R T I C L E S
• Lydia Hamlett, “Pandora at Petworth House: New Light on the Work and Patronage of Louis Laguerre,” pp. 950–55.
• Jennifer Melville, “Lady Forbes of Monymusk: A Rediscovered Portrait by Joshua Reynolds,” pp. 956–60.
• Brendan Cassidy, “A Portrait by Gavin Hamilton: Sir John Henderson of Fordell,” pp. 961–63.
• Alex Kidson, “David Solkin’s Art in Britain, 1660–1815 (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015),” pp. 964–67.

L E T T E R S
• Peter Lindfield, “A Further Allusion to Strawberry Hill at Lee Priory, Kent,” p. 979.
• Nicholas Penny, “Hugh Honour,” p. 979.

R E V I E W S
• Susanna Avery-Quash, Review of Lucilla Burn, The Fitzwilliam Museum: A History (Philip Wilson Publishers, 2016), p. 980.
• Greg Smith, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Tim Barringer and Oliver Fairclough, Pastures Green & Dark Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape (Giles, 2014), pp. 981–82.
• Barry Bergdoll, Review of Stefan Koppelkamm, The Imaginary Orient: Exotic Buildings of the 18th and 19th Centuries in Europe (Axel Munges, 2015), p. 982.
• Giles Waterfield, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Victoria Avery, Melissa Calaresu, and Mary Laven, eds., Treasured Possessions from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (Philip Wilson Publishers, 2015), p. 988.
• Malcolm Bull, Review of the exhibition In the Light of Naples: The Art of Francesco de Mura (Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park, 2016; Chazen Museum, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2017; The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, 2017), pp. 1006–07.

S U P P L E M E N T
• Tim Knox, “Recent Acquisitions (2012–16) at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge,” pp. 1017–28.

Anglo-Indian desk. Production Place: Vizagapatam, near Madras, in Southern India. Rosewood inlaid with finely engraved ivory, with silver handles, c.1750-1760. On loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge from Lady Hayter since March 2012. Belonged to Sir Thomas Rumbold, 1st Baronet (1736-1791), a British administrator in India.

The Rumbold Desk, by an unknown craftsman from Vizagapatam, Southern India, ca. 1750–60, rosewood inlaid with ivory, silver handles, 76 × 113 × 62 cm. Accepted in Lieu of Inheritance Tax by HM Government and allocated to the Fitzwilliam Museum, 2016 (M.3–2016). This Anglo-Indian desk has been on loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge since 2012 and is one of the finest of a very small group of similar desks made for British patrons in India at Vizagapatam (near Madras), a centre for the manufacture of such luxurious ivory-inlaid furniture. It belonged to Sir Thomas Rumbold, 1st baronet (1736–91), a British administrator in India, who amassed a great fortune in the service of the East India Company and served as Governor of Madras from 1777 to 1780. 

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Burlington Magazine, November 2016

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 28, 2016

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

201611-coverThe Burlington Magazine 158 (November 2016)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucia Simonato, “A New Work by Domenico Guidi: The Bust of Cardinal Gianfrancesco Albani,” pp. 885–90.
• Bent Sørensen, “The Parisian Career of Jacques François Saly, 1749–53,” pp. 891–99.

L E T T E R

• Kim Legate, “More on Chippendale at Hestercombe House,” p. 904.

R E V I E W S

• Anthony Geraghty, Review of Owen Hopkins, From the Shadows: The Architecture and Afterlife of Nicholas Hawksmoor (Rekation Books, 2015), p. 907–08.
• Tessa Murdoch, Review of Malcolm Baker, The Marble Index: Roubiliac and Sculptural Portraiture in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015), p. 908.
• Martin Postle, Review of James Ayres, Art, Artisans, and Apprentices: Apprentice Painters and Sculptors in the Early Modern British Tradition (Oxbow Books, 2014), p. 909.
• Loyd Grossman, Review of Susan Rather, The American School: Artists and Status in the Late-Colonial and Early National Era (Yale University Press, 2016), pp. 909–10.
• François Quiviger, Review of Andrea Daninos, Una Rivoluzione di Cera: Francesco Orso e e i «cabinets de figures» in Francia (Officina Libraria, 2016), pp. 911–12.
• Philip Ward-Jackson, Review of Vanessa Brett, Bertrand’s Toyshop in Bath: Luxury Retailing, 1685–1765 (Oblong Creative, 2014), p. 912.
• Jamie Mulherron, Review of the exhibition Marseille au XVIIIe siècle: Les années de l’Académie, 1753–1793 (Le Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille, 2016), pp. 921–23.
• Jeremy Warren, Review of the exhibition Splendida Minima (Tesoro dei Granduchi, Palazzo Pitti, Florence, 2016), pp. 923–24. [Includes the eighteenth-century reception of these small-scale sculptures.]

Save

Save

Save

Save