Enfilade

The Art Bulletin, September 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 22, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of The Art Bulletin 104 (September 2022) . . .

A R T I C L E S

• Tomasz Grusiecki, “Doublethink: Polish Carpets in Transcultural Contexts,” pp. 29–54.
A group of carpets termed tapis polonais (French for “Polish carpets”) were mistakenly given this name in the nineteenth century, despite their Persian provenience. Today, these artifacts are often described as “so-called Polish carpets,” emphasizing the historical confusion which led to coining the phrase. Evidence from both early modern and modern archival and literary sources suggests, however, that to fully understand the significance of tapis polonais we must embrace their transcultural contexts. Embedded in ongoing cycles of recontextualization and reappropriation, tapis polonais effectively challenge outdated assumptions that cultural forms can be simply assigned to a single cultural region and its historical traditions.

Vincennes Manufactory, after Pierre Blondeau, after François Boucher, La Danseuse (Dancer), ca. 1752, soft-paste biscuit porcelain, 22 × 14 × 8 cm (Cleveland Museum of Art).

• Susan M. Wager, Boucher’s Spirit: Authorship, Invention, and the Force of Porcelain,” pp. 55–83.
Deemed “ridiculous dolls” by Johann Joachim Winckelmann, porcelain figurines have long resided on the outskirts of art history. The exceptional case of biscuit porcelain figurines, invented in France in the 1750s, has been folded into an anachronistic story of stylistic change. This essay disentangles the history of porcelain figurines from the history of Neoclassicism. Through a close reading of the abbé Jean-Bernard Le Blanc’s (1707–1781) art criticism and analysis of a 1761 set of reproductive prints, it shows that biscuit figurines designed by the quintessentially rococo painter François Boucher defied assumptions about porcelain’s irreducible materiality, complicating fundamental eighteenth-century ideas about authorship.

R E V I E W S

• Kirsten Pai Buick, Review of Aston Gonzalez, Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 2020); Paul Kaplan, Contraband Guides: Race, Transatlantic Culture, and the Arts in the Civil War Era (Penn State University Press, 2020); and Teresa Goddu, Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020), pp. 150–57.

• Atreyee Gupta, Review of Niharika Dinkar, Empires of Light: Vision, Visibility and Power in Colonial India (University of Manchester Press, 2019), pp. 158–60.

• Alina Payne, Review of Fabio Barry, Painting in Stone: Architecture and the Poetics of Marble from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (Yale University Press, 2020), pp. 160–63.

 

Print Quarterly, September 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 15, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.3 (September 2022)

Anonymous artist after Sébastien Leclerc, View of the Hall of Mirrors, ca. 1684, pen and brown ink, brown wash on paper, 13.6 × 9.1 cm (Musée National des Châteaux du Versailles, INV.DESS 1247).

Tomáš Valeš, “Franz Anton Maulbertsch, Jakob Matthias Schmutzer and the Allegory on the Edict of Toleration, 1785

This article discusses new insights into the painter Franz Anton Maulbertsch (1724–1796) and the creation of his print, the Allegory on the Edict of Toleration (1785). It adduces two letters from the engraver Jakob Mattias Schmutzer (1733–1811), his collaborator since the 1750s and later his father-in-law. The article discusses the strategies used for the print’s distribution and also presents an analysis of the print’s preparatory drawing and three proof impressions.

Antoine Gallay, “Sébastien Leclerc’s Preparatory Drawing for the View of the Hall of Mirrors (1684): A Reassessment”

This short article re-examines the status of a drawing acquired by the Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon in 2008, traditionally attributed to Sébastien Leclerc and thought to have been made in preparation for his famous print of the View of the Hall of Mirror (1684). The author also presents a second little known drawing which was most certainly made by Leclerc himself in preparation for the print. Comparison between this drawing and the print offers new insight on the early appearance of the Hall of Mirrors and on Leclerc’s artistic conception and practices.

The issue also includes these relevant notes and reviews:

Battle Engravings for the Emperors of China

Jean Michel Massing, Review of Henriette Lavaulx-Vrécourt, Niklas Leverenz and Alexey Pastukhov, Berlin Battle Engravings: 34 Copperplates for the Emperors of China / Berliner Schlachtenkupfer: 34 Druckplatten der Kaiser von China (Berlin: Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), p. 305.

Thomas Gainsborough in London

Anne Lyles, Review of Susan Sloman, Gainsborough in London (London: Modern Art Press, 2021), p. 307.

Utamaro and the Spectacle of Beauty

Adam Haliburton, Review of Julie Nelson Davis, Utamaro and the Spectacle of Beauty (London: Reaktion Books, 2021), p. 308.

The Waterloo Map of Pierre-Jacques Goetghebuer

Inge Misschaert has contributed a brief analysis of the much-copied Map of the Battle of Waterloo (1815) by Belgian architect and engraver Pierre-Jacques Goetghebuer. The article elaborates on the production history of Goetghebuer’s map and its context alongside other adventurous competitors seeking to illustrate the famous battle in its immediate aftermath.

The Reception of Raphael

Carlo Schmid, Review of Andres Stolzenburg and David Klemm, eds., Raffael: Wirkung eines Genies (Petersberg: Hamburger Kunsthalle and Michael Imhof Verlag, 2021), p. 315.

The review focuses on the cult of Raphael which took off at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

The Fruitful Encounter Between Engraving and Photography

Francesca Maria Bonetti, Review of Nicolas Devigne and Virginie Caudron, eds., Contacts – Photographie – Gravure: Jeux et Enjeux (Aire-sur-la-Lys: ateliergaleriéditions and éditions Musée de Gravelines, 2020), p. 318.

Bonetti discusses the different photomechanical processes based on proto-photographic experiments carried out between  1824 and 1827 and known as heliography.

The Burlington Magazine, August 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on September 13, 2022

The August issue of The Burlington is rich for the eighteenth century, including Karin Wolfe’s obituary for Christopher Johns (details for his memorial service, on 17 September, are emerging here).

The Burlington Magazine 164 (August 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “A Borromini-Inspired Church Plan in Eighteenth-Century Lima,” pp. 740–51.
Built in 1758–66, the Church of Los Huérfanos, Lima, is unique in Spanish South America for its oval plan. Its designer is her identified as a master builder, Cristóbal de Vergas, who was inspired by prints of Francesco Borromini’s S. Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome, exemplifying the revival of interest during the Rococo perios in Roman Baroque precedents.

• Adam Bowett, “The Floral Marquetry Floor at Burghley House,” pp. 752–59.
The possibility that five pieces of eighteenth-century furniture at Burghley House, Stamford, incorporate maquetry made for a floor in the house c.1685 is here confirmed by references in inventories. The marquetry can be linked to furniture in the Royal Collection, raising the possibility that the floor was mdade by Gerrit Jensen incorporating marquetry supplied by Jasper Braems.

• François Marandet, “A Modello by Louis Laguerre and the Programme of the Painted Hall at Chatsworth,” pp. 760–67.
With the help of a recently discovered modello, the subject of Louis Laguerre’s monumental painting on the east wall of the Painted Hall, Chatsworth, is here identified as Augustus Ordering the Closing of the Doors of the Temple of Janus. This allows the political allegory of the room’s decoration, completed in 1694, to be fully understood for the first time.

R E V I E W S

• Neil Jeffares, “Pastels in the Pandemic,” pp. 780–87.
The notoriously fragile medium of pastel has not been out of the public eye during the difficult circumstances of the past two years. Exhibition in San Francisco and Munich and a biography of Rosalba Carriera invite comparisons between the major pastellists of the eighteenth century: Joseph Vivien, Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, and Jean-Étienne Liotard, as well as Carriera.

• Reinier Baarsen, Review of Calin Demetrescu, Les ébénistes de la Couronne sous le règne de Louis XIV (La Bibliothèque des Arts, 2021), pp. 818–19.

• Daniel Fulco, Review of Andreas Schumacher, ed., Venezianische Malerei: Staatsgalerie in der Residenz Würzburg (Schnell & Steiner, 2021), pp. 819–21.

• Howard Coutts, Review of Patricia Ferguson, ed., Pots, Prints, and Politics: Ceramics with an Agenda, from the 14th to the 20th Century (British Museum Press, 2021), pp. 821–22.

• Sophie Rhodes, Review of Tessa Murdoch, Europe Divided: Huguenot Refugee Art and Culture (V&A Museum, 2021), pp. 827–28.

• Patrick Bade, Review of Charles Dellheim, Belonging and Betrayal: How Jews Made the Art World Modern (Brandeis University Press, 2021), p. 828.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Karin Wolfe, Obituary for Christopher M.S. Johns (1955–2022), pp. 829–31.
Professor of History of Art at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, since 2003, Christopher M.S. Johns published widely on Italian art of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. His determination to demonstrate the falsity of the belief that the settecento was a period of cultural decline had a substantial influence on both scholarship and academic curricula.

 

 

H-France Forum 17.5 (2022) | Anne Lafont’s L’art et la race

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on August 8, 2022

The latest issue of H-France Forum, edited by Melissa Hyde, is dedicated to Anne Lafont’s L’art et la race. Melissa notes that since she is issue editor for H-France Forum in art history, we can expect to see one issue a year devoted to a recent book in French art history. She welcomes suggestions. And with some 4000 subscribers, H-France is a great place to make art history more visible. So, send her your ideas! CH

H-France Forum 17.5 (2022)
Issue edited by Melissa Hyde, University of Florida

Anne Lafont, L’art et la race : l’Africain (tout) contre l’œil des Lumières (Dijon: Les presses du réel, 2019).

Review Essays
• Christy Pichichero, George Mason University
• Andrew Curran, Wesleyan University
• Zirwat Chowdhury, University of California, Los Angeles
• Charlotte Guichard, CNRS and Ecole Normale Supérieure

Response Essay
• Anne Lafont, EHESS

All essays are available here»

Print Quarterly, June 2022

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 16, 2022

Hippolyte Pochon, Du Courage ! En avant Marche (Courage, forward march!), 1815, hand-coloured etching, 23 × 31cm
(Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale)

◊   ◊   ◊   ◊   ◊

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.2 (June 2022)

Antony Griffiths, “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815, Part II.”

Part II of Antony Griffiths’ article on “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815” discusses the numerous new names, found only in these years, who deposited prints giving their surname and address. Most of these were the actual producers, and many of the most frequent names can be identified. The article turns to each of the main artists individually, many of whom were leading figures in the school of Jacques Louis David. They included Louis François Charon, Gautier, Charles François Gabriel Levachez, Pierre Audouin, Pierre Marie Bassompierre Gaston, Charles Marie Dubois-Maisonneuve, Pierre Lacroix, Louis Félix Legendre, Jean Jacques Théodore Sauvé, Desalle, Charles Elie, Michael Raphael Vautier and Hippolyte Pochon, whose work was particularly well-executed and imaginative.

 The issue also includes these relevant reviews:

Johann Georg Edlinger (1741–1819)

Hans Jakob Meier, Review of Brigitte Huber, Georg Edlinger: Porträts ohne Schmeichelei (Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2021), p. 194.

Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces

Nadine Orenstein, Review of Sam Segal and Klara Alen, Dutch and Flemish Flower Pieces: Paintings, Drawings and Prints up to the Nineteenth Century (Leiden: Brill and Hes & De Graaf, 2020), p. 226.

The Burlington Magazine, May 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 13, 2022

The eighteenth century in the May issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (May 2022)

E D I T O R I A L

• “The Rustat Memorial,” p. 443.

When the statue of Edward Colston was defaced and thrown into Bristol harbour on 7th June 2020 the resulting publicity was so enormous that it seemed likely that a wholesale assault on memorials to men who took part in the slave trade or were racist would inevitably follow. In fact, remarkably little has happened. . . .

Little more has been done in the case of church monuments. . . . Only one such case is outstanding, an application by St Peter’s church, Dorchester, to move a late eighteenth-century wall memorial to the slave owner John Gordon from the church to Dorchester Museum. If such an application is contested the matter is referred to the judgment of a diocesan Chancellor in a Consistory Court. This was the result of the ecclesiastical case that has attracted most attention, the application by the Master and governing body of Jesus College, Cambridge, to remove the monument to Tobias Rustat (1608–94) from the college chapel, which was opposed by a group of former members of the college. The case was heard in February by David R. Hodge, Deputy Chancellor of the Diocese of Ely, who in March dismissed the application. Last month the college announced that it would not appeal against his decision. . .

A R T I C L E S

• Antoinette Friedenthal, “Prince Eugene of Savoy’s Rembrandt Drawings: A Newly Discovered Provenance,” pp. 450–61.

• Pascal-François Bertrand and Charissa Bremer David, “Paintings in Beauvais Tapestry, 1764–67,” pp. 462–72. In 1764, at a time when the Royal Tapestry Manufactory at Beauvais was short of work, its directors, Laurent and André Charlemagne Charron, initiated the weaving of small tapestry panels based on designs by François Boucher. Intended as inexpensive, independent works of art, they were in essence a short-lived marketing venture. Records of their weaving in the firm’s payment registers allow a number of surviving examples to be identified.

• Sofya Dmitrieva, “Carle Van Loo at the 1737 Salon,” pp. 473–77. Although not pendants in the traditional sense, since they were painted for different patrons, it is argued here that Carle Van Loo’s A Pasha Having His Mistress’s Portrait Painted and The Grand Turk Giving a Concert to His Mistress, shown at the Salon of 1737, were meant to be read as a pair|—as portraits of the artist and his wife and as allegories of Painting and Music. By linking the paintings, Van Loo, may have intended them to make a statement on the changing relations between art and patronage.

R E V I E W S

• Duncan Robinson, Review of Susan Sloman, Gainsborough in London (Modern Art Press, 2021), pp. 478–85.

• Satish Padiyar, Review of the exhibition Jacques-Louis David: Radical Draftsman (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2022), pp. 492–95.

• Kee Il Choi, Jr., Review of the exhibition Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Wallace Collection, and The Huntington, 2022–23), pp. 504–07.

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the re-installation of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Venetian paintings at the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice (from August 2021), pp. 507–09.

• Stefania Girometti, Review of Joachim Jacoby, Städels Erbe: Meisterzeichnungen aus der Sammlung des Stifters (Sandstein Verlag, 2020), pp. 529–30. Comprehensive analysis of “the collection of drawings assembled by Johann Friedrich S (1728–1816), the founder of the art institute and museum in Frankfurt that bears his name.”

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of the exhibition catalogue Watteau at Work: La Surprise (Getty, 2021), pp. 530–31.

• Hugo Chapman, Review of Cristiana Romalli, Cento Disegni dalla Collezione della Fondazione Marco Brunelli (Ugo Bozzi, 2020), pp. 531–32.

The Burlington Magazine, April 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 18, 2022

The eighteenth century in the April issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (April 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucy Davis and Natalia Muñoz-Rojas, “The Provenance of Het Steen and The Rainbow Landscape by Rubens,” pp. 333–41. New documentary evidence elucidates the hitherto uncertain history of these two celebrated landscapes painted by Peter Paul Rubens ca. 1636. Having remained with this family after his death, they were purchased by the Marquess of Caracena, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and taken to Madrid. By 1706 they were in Genoa, in the collections of successively Bartolomeo Saluzzo (1652–1705) and Costantino Balbi (d. 1740). This article assimilates a number of archival discoveries that shed light not only on the provenance of these two paintings but also on two important Genoese collections.

• Lucia Bonazzi, “Richard Vickris Pryor in the Art Market of Napoleonic Europe,” pp. 342–49. The son of a Quaker family of brewers and wine merchants, Richard Vickris Pryor (1780–1807) spent his brief adult life in pursuit of paintings. A characteristic example of the sort of entrepreneur who sought to exploit the release of works of art onto the market in the wake of Napoleon’s campaigns, he scored his greatest success with the purchase of the Lechi collection in Brescia in 1802.

• Margaret Oppenheimer, “From Paris to New York: French Paintings from the Collection of Eliza Jumel,” pp. 350–61. Eliza Jumel (1775–1865), born in poverty, was one of New York’s richest women at her death in 1865. While in Paris in 1815–17 she formed the largest collection of European paintings yet assembled by an American, the largest part of them French. Sold in 1821, the collection has been all but forgotten, but it has proved possible to trace a number of the works she owned.

R E V I E W S

• Noémi Duperron, Review of the exhibition Le Théâtre de Troie: Antoine Coypel, d’Homère à Virgile (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 2022), pp. 394–96.
• Eric Zafran, Review of the exhibition Paintings on Stone: Science and the Sacred, 1530–1800 (Saint Louis Art Museum, 2022), pp. 396–99.
• Peter Y. K. Lam, Review of the exhibition catalogue Sarah Wong and Stacey Pierson, eds., Collectors, Curators, Connoisseurs: A Century of the Oriental Ceramic Society, 1921–2021 (Oriental Ceramic Society, 2021), pp. 402–03.
• Rowan Watson, Review of Richard Rouse and Mary Rouse, Renaissance Illuminators in Paris: Artists and Artisans, 1500–1715 (Harvey Miller, 2019), pp. 418–19.
• Richard Wrigley, Review of Iris Moon and Richard Taws, eds., Time, Media, and Visuality in Post-Revolutionary France (Bloomsbury, 2021), pp. 423–24.
• Philip Ward-Jackson Review of Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Neue Pinakothek: Katalog der Skulpturen; Volume I: Die Sammlung Ludwigs I, Volume II: Adolf von Hildebrand (Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), pp. 424–25. “This is a vital link in the chain between Enlightenment celebrations of worthies and grand hommes and such later nineteenth-century sculptural pantheons as those on the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the Albert Memorial, London . . .” (424).

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary for Jonathan Brown (1939–2022), pp. 427–28. As well as bringing many fresh insights to the study of the major Spanish artists from El Greco to Picasso, with a particular focus on Velázquez, Jonathan Brown made important contributions to the study of patronage and collecting and of the diffusion of the images and ideas in the wider Hispanic world. Much honoured in Spain as well as in his native America, he will also be remembered as a dedicated and assiduous teacher.

The Burlington Magazine, February 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on March 31, 2022

The eighteenth century in February’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (February 2022) — Northern European Art

Nathaniel Dance Holland, Portrait of Christian VII, King of Denmark, 1768, oil on canvas, 77 × 63 cm (Royal Collection Trust).

A R T I C L E S

• Sara Ayres, “Christian VII of Denmark’s Lost British Portraits,” pp. 155–63. In 1768–69 the young Christian VII of Denmark visited London and Paris, where several portraits of him were painted. Three were by artists born or working in Britain—Angelica Kauffmann, Edward Cunningham, known as Calze, and Matthew Peters. All are now lost, but evidence about the comissions survives in copies and prints, contemporary descriptions and documents in the Danish State Archives.

• Lars Hendrikman, “The Finding of the Infant Bacchus,” pp. 180–83.

R E V I E W S

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the exhibition Venetia 1600: Births and Rebirths (Venice: Palazza Ducale, 2021–22), pp. 190–92.

• Ivan Gaskell, Review of the new galleries of Dutch and Flemish art at the MFA Boston (open from November 2021), pp. 195–98.

• Richard Stemp, Review of the exhibition Hogarth and Europe (London: Tate Britain, 2021–22), pp. 198–200.

• Maryl Gensheimer, Review of Fabio Barry, Painting in Stone: Architecture and the Poetics of Marble from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (Yale UP, 2020), pp. 216–17.

• Clare Hornsby, Review of Ortwin Dally, Maria Gazzetti, and Arnold Nesselrath, eds., Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717–1768): Ein Europ isches Rezeptionsph nomen / Fenomeno Europeo della Ricezione (Michael Imhof Verlag, 2021), pp. 217–18.

• Robert Skwirblies, Review of Lea Kuhn, Gemalte Kunstgeschichte: Bildgenealogien in der Malerei um 1800 (Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2020), pp. 218–19.

• Thomas Stammers, Review of Stacey Boldrick, Iconoclasm and the Museum (Routledge, 2020), p. 222.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Marjorie Trusted, “Christian Theuerkauff (1936–2021),” pp. 223–24. For many years Deputy Director of the sculpture collection at the Bode Museum, Berlin, and honorary professor at the city’s Free University, Christian Theuerkauff was a leading scholar of Baroque ivories, whose expert connosseurship and archival research definitively shaped our understanding of many of the outstanding sculptors in the medium.

 

Print Quarterly, March 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 12, 2022

The long eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 39.1 (March 2022) . .

Charles Elie, T[alma] donnant une leçon de grâce et de dignité impériale (T[alma] giving a lesson in grace and imperial dignity), 1814, hand-coloured etching, 244 x 142 mm (London: British Museum).

A R T I C L E S

Antony Griffiths, “The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815, Part I: The Established Printsellers, Genty and Martinet,” pp. 31ff.

Two articles by Antony Griffiths on ‘The Publication of Caricatures in Paris in 1814 and 1815’—Part 1 in the March 2022 issue and Part 2 forthcoming—discuss the publication of caricatures in Paris during two years in which there were four regimes in power, and two occupations by foreign armies—a period which led to an unprecedented outpouring of social and political satire. Many works of great quality were produced, but most have only a title and do not reveal the names of the producers. The articles discuss how publishers and artists dealt with the political upheavals and identify some of the many participants who entered the field in these years. Part 1 deals with the caricatures published by members of the established print trade in Paris, and in particular Aaron Martinet and the newcomer Genty, who has previously been misidentified.

R E V I E W S

• Mark McDonald, Review of Juan Agustín Ceán Bermúdez, El Churriguerismo: discurso inédito (Alicante: Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2019), p. 79.

• Diana Greenwald, Review of Madeleine Viljoen, Nina Dubin and Meredith Martin, Meltdown! Picturing the World’s First Bubble Economy (Turnhout: Harvey Miller, 2020), p. 80.

• Ann V. Gunn, Review of John Bonehill, Anne Dulau Beveridge, and Nigel Leask, eds., Old Ways New Roads: Travels in Scotland 1720–1832 (Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2021), p. 81.

• Marcia Reed, Review of Troy Bickham, Eating the Empire: Food and Society in Eighteenth-Century Britain (London: Reaktion, 2020), p. 84.

• Nigel Tattersfield, Review of Graham Williams, Thomas Bewick Engraver & the Performance of Woodblocks (Kent: Florin Press, 2021), p. 86.

• Janis A. Tomlinson, Review of Mark McDonald et al., Goya’s Graphic Imagination (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2021), p. 102.

Print Quarterly, December 2021

Posted in books, exhibitions, reviews by Editor on December 8, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2021) . . .

Matthew Darly, The Flower Garden, 1777, etching and engraving with watercolour, 35 × 25 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Elizabeth L. Block, Review of Luigi Amara, The Wig: A Hairbrained History, translated by Christina MacSweeney (Reaktion Books, 2020), p. 436.

Elizabeth Block gives an overview of the 33 brief chapters of Luigi Amara’s The Wig: A Hairbrained History. The chapter “Towering Hairdos” looks at the expensive and impractical styles of wigs in the years before the French Revolution, whilst “Dressing Up Justice” focuses on William Hogarth’s The Bench, 1758–64, an engraving depicting bewigged magistrates. Block praises this work for its entertaining and enjoyable qualities, but highlights its lack of academic rigour, suggesting at the end works to turn to for a more scholarly treatment of the subject.

Richard Taws, Review of the exhibition catalogue William Blake, edited by Martin Myrone and Amy Concannon (Tate, 2019), p. 438.

Reviewing the catalogue for the exhibition William Blake, held at Tate Britain in 2019–20, Richard Taws discusses the book’s five chapters covering the artist’s early artistic milieu, his career as printmaker, his relationship with patronage and display, and his reclamation by a younger generation of artists. It is noted that in the authors’ attempt to demythologise Blake, they are successful in creating a “Blake for all,” who satisfies both a specialist and popular audience.

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