Enfilade

Eighteenth-Century Studies, Summer 2018

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on August 6, 2018

While there’s plenty to relish in the latest issue of ECS, I’m glad to highlight, in particular, this important article by Paris Amanda Spies-Gans. I’ve also listed all three single title book reviews; while none of them deal specifically with the visual arts, it’s easy to see (perhaps particularly with the first two) points of methodological relevancy for art history. CH

Eighteenth-Century Studies 51.4 (Summer 2018)

A R T I C L E S

• Paris Amanda Spies-Gans, “Exceptional, but not Exceptions: Public Exhibitions and the Rise of the Woman Artist in London and Paris, 1760–1830,” pp. 393–416.

From 1760 to 1830, more than 1,300 women exhibited more than 6,000 works of art in London and Paris’ premier art exhibitions—an unprecedented surge in female artistic activity and its public reception. This article traces that transformation, which strikingly mirrors the progress of the French Revolutionary Wars, and contends that the Revolutionary era opened vital opportunities for female artists on both sides of the Channel despite cultural differences. It thus argues for a recasting of period’s historical narrative to integrate women’s omnipresence in the public, professional art world, and a reevaluation of their hitherto dominant categorization as ‘amateur’ artists. It also challenges the historiographical argument that the Revolutionary era was principally a defeat for women in Britain and France.

R E V I E W S

• Kristina Straub, Review of Susan Lanser, The Sexuality of History: Modernity and the Sapphic, 1565–1830 (The University of Chicago, 2014), pp. 479–82.
• Renee Bryzik, Review of Katrin Berndt, Narrating Friendship and the British Novel, 1760–1830 (Routledge, 2017), pp. 483–85.
• Nancy Vogeley, Review of Jonathan Israel, The Expanding Blaze: How the American Revolution Ignited the World, 1775–1848 (Princeton University Press, 2017), pp. 485–87.

The Burlington Magazine, July 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on July 21, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (July 2018)

E D I T O R I A L

• Michael Hall, “At the Royal Academy of Arts,” p. 535. This is the Royal Academy’s year. The venerable London institution has celebrated its 250th anniversary by unveiling a redevelopment that has added seventy per cent more public space, staging a Summer Exhibition that has garnered five-star reviews, mounting an exhibition, The Great Spectacle, which traces the history of the annual exhibition since its inception in 1768, and publishing a monumental multi-author history of itself and its collections. . . .

A R T I C L E S

• Dorothea Diemer and Linda Hinners, “‘Gerhardt Meyer Made Me in Stockholm’: A Bronze ‘Bathing Woman’ after Giambologna,” pp. 545–53. Spurred by rivalry with French founders working for the Swedish Crown, in 1697 Gerhardt Meyer the Elder cast a bronze figure of a nude woman after a marble by Giambologna that had been in Sweden since 1632. It is inscribed ‘Me fecit Gerhardt Meyer Holmiae’.

R E V I E W S

• Laurel O. Peterson, Review of the exhibition Visitors to Versailles, 1682–1789 (Château de Versailles, 2017–18; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2018), pp. 582–84.
• Louis Cellauro and Gilbert Richaud, Review of the exhibition Jacques-François Blondel: An Enlightenment Architect in Metz (The Arsenal, Metz, 2018), pp. 584–86.
• Paul Taylor, Review of Susanna Berger, The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment (Princeton University Press, 2017), pp. 606–07.
• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Ilona Katzew, ed., Painted in Mexico / Pintado en México, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici (Prestel, 2017), pp. 607–08.
• Sophie Littlewood, Review of Donald J. La Rocca, How to Read European Armor (Metropolitan Museum of Art and Yale University Press, 2017), p. 613.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Andrew Wilton, Obituary of Malcolm Cormack (1935–2018), p. 617. When the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, opened in 1977, Malcolm Cormack was its first Curator of Paintings. At Yale, and subsequently at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, he staged influential exhibitions on subjects ranging from William Blake to the Camden Town Group.

 

The Burlington Magazine, June 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 26, 2018

As the June 2018 issue of The Burlington launches a new design (the work of Studio Frank), editor Michael Hall provides a brief overview of the history of the journal’s design in his editorial comments, noting that “many readers now access the magazine in its digital edition and for most people the first sight of the cover is likely to be on the screen of a tablet or smartphone, meaning that it has to work on a small scale” (453).

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (June 2018)

A R T I C L E S

• Tessa Murdoch, “A Set of Silver-Gilt Waiters by Benjamin Pyne for the Courtenay Family of Powderham Castle, Devon,” pp. 478–89.

R E V I E W S

• Xavier F. Salomon, Review of the exhibition Tiepolo Segreto (Vicenza: Palladio Museum, 2017–18), pp. 495–97.
• Sanda Miller, Review of the exhibition Fashioned from Nature (London: V&A, 2018), 497–99.
• Steven Jaron, Review of John Onians, European Art: A Neuroarthistory (Yale UP, 2016), 516–17.
• Antoine Maës, Review of Alexandre Maral, François Girardon (1628–1715): Le Sculpteur de Louis XIV (Arthena, 2015), p. 519.
• Clare Hornsby, Review of Paola Bianchi and Karin Wolfe, eds., Turin and the British in the Age of the Grand Tour (Cambridge UP, 2017), pp. 520–21.
• Jonathan Brown, Review of Elena Santiago Páez, ed., Ceán Bermúdez: Historiador del arte y coleccionista ilustrado (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, 2016), p. 521.
• Timothy Wilcox, Review of Ann Gunn, The Prints of Paul Sandby (1731–1809): A Catalogue Raisonné (Brepols, 2016), pp. 521–23.
• Caroline Finkel, Review of Francis Russell, 123 Places in Turkey: A Private Grand Tour (Bitter Lemon Press, 2017), p. 527.

 

Print Quarterly, June 2018

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 1, 2018

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 35.2 (June 2018):

Juan Camarón, Robinson in his Llama Skin Habit and Parasol, 1788–89, brush and grey wash, 110 × 65 mm (London, British Library).

A R T I C L E S
• Benito Navarrete Prieto and Alejandro Martínez Pérez, “Drawings for the Spanish Robinson Crusoe by José Juan Camarón and Rafael Ximeno,” pp. 160–72.
The article addresses newly identified drawings by José Camarón and Rafael Ximeno for the seminal Spanish edition of Robinson Crusoe by Tomás de Iriarte, published in Madrid in 1789. The presence of the drawing for the map and the narrative illustrations among Iriarte’s papers underscore the poet’s close involvement with the book’s production and illustration.
• Kate Heard, “The Royal Collection of Satirical Prints in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” pp. 173–82.
In describing the the history of the collection of satirical prints in Britain’s royal collection before their sale in 1921 to the Library of Congress, the article explains the origins of the collection under George III, its development most famously under George IV, its continued growth under Queen Victoria and Prince Albert—when Georgian works entered the collection that would not have been acquired earlier, including prints that were critical of the royal family—and finally the disfavor the collection solicited during the reign of George V from the royal librarian John Fortescue, who brokered the 1921 sale.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S
• Celina Fox, Review of Bernard Nurse, London: Prints and Drawings before 1800 (Bodleian Library, 2017), pp. 198–200.
• Susan Sloman, Review of Ann Gunn, The Prints of Paul Sandby (1731–1809): A Catalogue Raisonné (Brepols and Harvey Miller Publishers, 2016), pp. 200–03.
• Flavia Pesci, Review of the exhibition catalogue Nicholas Stanley Price, At the Foot of the Pyramid: 300 Years of the Cemetery for Foreigners in Rome (Casa di Goethe Museum, 2016), pp. 203–04.
• Mark McDonald, Review of the catalogue Peter Raissis, Prints and Drawings: Europe 1500–1900 from the Art Gallery of New South Wales (Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2014), pp. 204–06.
• Charles Newton, Review of Elisabeth Fraser, Mediterranean Encounters: Artists between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774–1839 (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2017), pp. 206–09.

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Note (added 6 June 2018) — The original posting did not include descriptions for the two articles.

The Burlington Magazine, May 2018

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on May 31, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (May 2018)

Agostino Cornacchini, Charlemagne, 1725, marble (St Peter’s Basilica).

A R T I C L E S

• Gloria Martínez Leiva, “Art as Diplomacy: John Closterman’s Portraits of Carlos II of Spain and His Wife Queen Maria Anna of Neuburg,” pp. 381–86.
• Teresa Leonor M. Vale, “Art and Festivities in Eighteenth-Century Rome: Letters from a Portuguese Priest, 1721–22,” pp. 387–93.

R E V I E W S

• Christopher Rowell, Review of the exhibition Thomas Chippendale: A Celebration of Craftsmanship and Design, 1718–2018 (Leeds City Museum, 2018), pp. 414–16.
• Charles Darwent, Review of the exhibition The Dutch in Paris, 1789–1914 (Paris: Petit Palais, 2018), pp. 420–21.
• Stéphane Loire, Review of Giancarlo Sestieri, Il capriccio architettonico in Italia nel XVII e XVIII secolo (Etgraphiae editoriale, 2015), p. 432.
• Andrew McClellan, Review of Geneviève Bresc-Bautier and Béatrice de Chancel-Bardelot, eds., Un musée révolutionaire: Le Musée des Monuments français d’Alexandre Lenoir (Musée du Louvre, 2016), pp. 432–33.

The Burlington Magazine, March 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 27, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (March 2018)


Portrait of a Consul, identified by Lucy Whitaker as a portrait of Joseph Smith, pencil and watercolour on paper, 28.6 × 20 cm; page from Giovanni Grevembroch: Gli abiti de’ veneziani di quasi ogni età con diligenza raccoliti e dipinti nel secolo XVIII (Venice: Biblioteca del Museo Correr, MS Gradenigo-Dolfin 49, II, fol.125.2).

A R T I C L E S

• Lucy Whitaker, “A Portrait of Consul Smith,” pp. 214–16. A watercolour in Giovanni Grevembroch’s Gli abiti de’ veneziani, compiled ca. 1754–59, can probably be identified as the only surviving portrait of the celebrated art collector and art dealer Joseph Smith, British consul in Venice from 1744 to 1760.
• Esmé Whittaker, “‘Almost Her Creation’: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, and the Decoration of Chiswick House,” pp. 217–25. Letters, inventories and contemporary prints and drawings help paint a clearer picture of the extensions made to Chiswick House, London, in 1790–92 and the role that Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, played in their execution and furnishing.

R E V I E W S

• Duncan Robinson, Review of the exhibition Casanova: The Seduction of Europe (Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, 2017; The Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 2018; and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2018), pp. 241–43.
• David Pullins, Review of the exhibition Shockingly Mad: Henry Fuseli and the Art of Drawing (Art Institute of Chicago, 2018), pp. 243–44.

Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte 80.4 (2017), Penser le rococo

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on January 22, 2018

The current issue of Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte focuses on the theme ‘Reconsidering the Rococo’, the subject of a November 2015 conference at the University of Lausanne. Abstracts (in English) are available as a PDF file here.

Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte 80.4 (2017), Penser le rococo
Guest edited by Carl Magnusson and Marie-Pauline Martin

A R T I C L E S

• Carl Magnusson, “Le rococo, une construction historiographique: introduction”
• Marie-Pauline Martin, “‹Rococo›: du jargon à la catégorie de style”
• Catherine Thomas-Ripault, “Evasion temporelle et fantaisie créatrice: usage des peintures du xviiie siècle dans les fictions romantiques”
• Etienne Tornier , “‹This new-born word is rococo›: Généalogie et fortune du rococo aux États-Unis”
• Jean-François Bédard, “La vitalité du décor : Fiske Kimball, du rococo au Colonial Revival”
• Carl Magnusson, “Le rococo est-il décoratif ?”
• David Pullins, “‹Quelques misérables places à remplir›: Locating Shaped Painting in ­Eighteenth-Century France
• Bérangère Poulain, “Rococo et fugacité du regard: émergence et modifications de la notion de ‹papillotage›”

R E V I E W S

• Paul Williamson, Review of Laurence Terrier Aliferis, L’imitation de l’Antiquité dans l’art médiéval, 1180–1230 (Répertoire iconographique de la littérature du Moyen Âge, Études du RILMA, vol. 7, 2016).
• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of Jérôme Delaplanche, Un tableau n’est pas qu’une image: La reconnaissance de la matière de la peinture en France au XVIIIe siècle (2016).
• Martin Dönike, Review of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, Monumenti antichi inediti spiegati ed illustrati, Roma 1767, edited by Adolf H. Borbein and Max Kunze (2011) | Johann Joachim Winckelmann, Monumenti antichi inediti spiegati ed illustrati, Roma 1767, edited by Adolf H. Borbein, Max Kunze, and Axel Rügler (2015).
• Anna Degler, Review of Guillaume Cassegrain, La coulure: Histoire(s) de la peinture en mouvement, XIe–XXIe siècles (2015).

The Burlington Magazine, January 2018

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on January 20, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington, which includes, as noted last week, mention of HECAA and J18 in the editorial in connection with the new scholarship:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (January 2018)

E D I T O R I A L

“The Burlington Magazine Scholarship for the Study of French Eighteenth-Century Fine and Decorative Art,” p. 3. This month The Burlington Magazine launches an annual scholarship for the study of French eighteenth-century fine and decorative art. Initiated and funded by Richard Mansell-Jones, a trustee of The Burlington Magazine Foundation, the scholarship offers £10,000 to a student based anywhere in the world who has embarked or is about to embark on an M.A. or Ph.D. or is undertaking research in a post-doctoral or independent capacity. The full review is available here (also see below).

A R T I C L E S

• Aloisio Antinori, “New Light on the Production of Il Tempio Vaticano,” pp. 22–30.

R E V I E W S

• Susan Walker, Review of Elizabeth Bartman, The Ince Blundell Collection of Classical Sculpture, Volume 3: The Ideal Sculpture (Liverpool University Press, 2017), pp. 64–5.
• Elizabeth Savage, Review of Mark Stocker and Phillip Lindley, eds., Tributes to Jean Michel Massing: Towards a Global Art History (Harvey Miller, 2016), p. 74. [The volume includes Robin Middleton’s essay, “A Cautionary Tale: The History of Eighteenth-Century Architecture in France.”]
• Jeremy Warren, Review of Giovanna Baldissin Molli and Elda Martellozzo Forin, eds., Gli inventari della Sacrestia della Cattedrale di Padova, secoli XIV–XVIII (Il Prato Publishing House, 2016), p. 75.

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The Burlington Magazine Scholarship for the Study of French Eighteenth-Century Fine and Decorative Art
Applications due by 1 March 2018

The Burlington Magazine is pleased to announce the launch of The Burlington Magazine scholarship for the study of French 18th-century fine and decorative art. The scholarship has been created to provide funding over a 12-month period to those engaged in the study of French 18th-century fine and decorative art to enable them to develop new ideas and research that will contribute to this field of art historical study.

Applicants must be studying, or intending to study, for an MA, PhD, post-doctoral or independent research in the field of French 18th-century fine and decorative arts within the 12-month period the funding is given. Applications are open to scholars from any country. A grant of £10,000 will be awarded to the successful applicant.

More information is available here»

Print Quarterly, December 2017

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 5, 2017

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Paul Sandby, The Fire of Faction. The Fly Machine for Scotland, 1762, etching (London: The British Museum).

Print Quarterly 34.4 (December 2017)

A R T I C L E S
• Aaron M. Hyman, “Patterns of Colonial Transfer: An Album of Prints in Mexico City,” pp. 393–99.
“The rediscovery of an album of European prints in Mexico City promises to fill in some of the scholarly gaps by bringing to roughly 500 the number of extant, loose-leaf European prints in Mexico that survive from the colonial period—vastly more than scholars were aware of only a decade ago. . . The album is loosely organized chronologically and by national schools, with the earliest prints appearing at the beginning, followed by the eighteenth-century material that constitutes most of it.”
• Ann V. Gunn, “The Fire of Faction: Sources of Paul Sandby’s Satires of 1762–63,” pp. 400–18.
“On 23 September 1762, ‘The Butifyer, a touch on the times. Also a poor man loaded with mischief, or John Bull and his sister Peg . . . Likewise the Fire of Faction’ were announced in The Public Advertiser, the first of three of a series of seven satirical prints created by Paul Sandy (1731–1809) in late 1762 during the negotiations for the Treaty of Paris that ended the Seven Years’ War . . . This group, however, has never been examined as a whole before. This article discusses the context within which these prints were made and identifies the imagery and literary sources employed in them.”

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S
• Louis Marchesano, Review of Kristina Deutsch, Jean Marot: Un graveur d’architecture à l’époque de Louis XIV (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2015), pp. 437–38.
• James Grantham Turner, Review of an issue of Casabella 856 (December 2015), dedicated to the Fondazione Querini Stampalia’s 2016 exhibition Giulio Romano’s I Modi and the Modi of of Carlo Scarpa and Alvaro Siza, which featured drawings by two modern architects with sexually explicit Italian prints from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, pp. 441–42.
• Antony Griffiths, Review of the exhibition catalogue Freyda Spira and Peter Parshall, The Power of Prints: The Legacy of William M. Ivins and A. Hyatt Mayor (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016), pp. 468–70.

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

• Sharon Liberman Mintz, Shaul Seidler-Feller, and David Wachtel, eds., The Writing on the Wall: A Catalogue of Judaica Broadsides from the Valmadonna Trust Library (London: Valmadonna Trust Library, 2015), p. 462.
• Christien Melzer, ed., Im Zeichen der Lilie: Französische Druckgraphik zur Zeit Ludwigs XIV (Bremen: Kunstverein Bremen, 2017), pp. 462–63.
• Petra Zelenková, Jan Kupecký a ‘černé umění’ / Johann Kupezky (1666–1740) and ‘The Black Art’ (Prague: National Gallery, 2016), p. 463.
• Anna Schultz, Johann Gottlieb Glume (1711–1778): Das Druckgraphische Werk (Berlin: Galerie Bassenge, 2016), p. 463.
• Laura Moretti, Recasting the Past: An Early Modern ‘Tales of Ise’ for Children (Leiden: Brill, 2016), p. 463.

The Burlington Magazine, November 2017

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 30, 2017

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 159 (November 2017)

A R T I C L E S

• Oronzo Brunetti, “A Nymphaeum for the Villa Salviati at Ponte alla Badia in Florence,” pp. 893–99.

R E V I E W S

• Jeremy Warren, Review of Mark Gregory d’Apuzzo, La collezione dei bronzi del Museo Civico Medievale di Bologna (Libro Co. Italia, 2017), pp. 912–13.
• François Marandet, Review of Hannah Williams, Académie Royale: A History in Portraits (Ashgate, 2015), pp. 918–19.
• Peter Murray, Review of Jane Fenlon, Ruth Kenny, Caroline Pegum, and Brendan Rooney, eds., Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period: New Perspectives on Artistic Practice, 1620–1820 (Irish Academic Press, 2016), p. 923.
• David Cowan, Review of the exhibition Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites (National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, 2017), pp. 930–31.
• Xavier F. Salomon, Review of the exhibition Caroline Murat, Sister of Napoleon, Queen of the Arts / Caroline, Soeur de Napoléon, Reine des Arts (Palais Fesch, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Ajaccio, Corsica, 2017), pp. 940–41.