Enfilade

Print Quarterly, December 2021

Posted in books, exhibitions, reviews by Editor on December 8, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2021) . . .

Matthew Darly, The Flower Garden, 1777, etching and engraving with watercolour, 35 × 25 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Elizabeth L. Block, Review of Luigi Amara, The Wig: A Hairbrained History, translated by Christina MacSweeney (Reaktion Books, 2020), p. 436.

Elizabeth Block gives an overview of the 33 brief chapters of Luigi Amara’s The Wig: A Hairbrained History. The chapter “Towering Hairdos” looks at the expensive and impractical styles of wigs in the years before the French Revolution, whilst “Dressing Up Justice” focuses on William Hogarth’s The Bench, 1758–64, an engraving depicting bewigged magistrates. Block praises this work for its entertaining and enjoyable qualities, but highlights its lack of academic rigour, suggesting at the end works to turn to for a more scholarly treatment of the subject.

Richard Taws, Review of the exhibition catalogue William Blake, edited by Martin Myrone and Amy Concannon (Tate, 2019), p. 438.

Reviewing the catalogue for the exhibition William Blake, held at Tate Britain in 2019–20, Richard Taws discusses the book’s five chapters covering the artist’s early artistic milieu, his career as printmaker, his relationship with patronage and display, and his reclamation by a younger generation of artists. It is noted that in the authors’ attempt to demythologise Blake, they are successful in creating a “Blake for all,” who satisfies both a specialist and popular audience.

The Burlington Magazine, September 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on September 29, 2021

The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (September 2021)

E D I T O R I A L

• “Nicholas Goodison and The Burlington,” p. 779.

A R T I C L E S

• David Pullins, Dorothy Mahon, Silvia A. Centeno, “The Lavoisiers by David: Technical Findings on Portraiture at the Brink of Revolution,” pp. 780–91.
Recent technical examination of Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Antoine-Laurent and Marie-Anne Lavoisier in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, painted between 1787 and 1788, has revealed significant and previously unknown alterations that transform our understanding of this celebrated portrait, its author, and its sitters.

R E V I E W S

• Susan Babaie, Review of the exhibition Epic Iran (V&A, 2021), pp. 837–39.

• Jonathan Conlin, Review of the exhibition Creating a National Collection: The Partnership between Southampton City Art Gallery and the National Gallery (Southampton City Art Gallery, 2021), pp. 845–48.

• Tanya Harrod, Review of the newly renovated Museum of the Home (previously the Geffrye Museum), pp. 858–61.

• John Bold, Review of John Martin Robinson, Wilton House: The Art, Architecture, and Interiors of One of Britain’s Great Stately Homes (Rizzoli Electa, 2021), pp. 872–74.

• Simon Lee, Review of Janis Tomlinson, Goya: A Portrait of the Artist (Princeton UP, 2020), pp. 874–75.

• Peter Fuhring, Review of Elena Cooper, Art and Modern Copyright: The Contested Image (Cambridge UP, 2018), pp. 875–76.

O B I T U A R Y

• Simon Jervis, “Ronald Lightbown (1932–2021),” pp. 879–80.
Spending most of his career at the Victoria and Albert Museum and National Art Library, Ronald Lightbown was a scholar of exceptional breadth, whose publications ranged from goldsmiths’ work of the late Middle Ages to Renaissance art and from the history of jewellery to Baroque wax sculpture.

 

Print Quarterly, September 2021

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 18, 2021

Gottfried August Gründler, Frontispiece Der Naturforscher (1774), engraving, 90 × 110 mm
(Cambridge University Library)

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.3 (September 2021)

William Pether, Eye Miniature, 1817, watercolour on ivory, embedded in red velvet, 27 × 22 mm (London: Victoria & Albert Museum).

A R T I C L E S

Dominika Cora, “New Light on the Life and Work of the Mezzotint Engraver William Pether (1739–1821)”

William Pether (1739–1821) was one of the most distinguished English mezzotint engravers in the second half of the eighteenth century. Responding to scholarly confusion around his life, this article presents archival discoveries that illuminate his biography and personal life, as well as unpublished drawings and an overview of his artistic output.

N O T E S

Anna Gielas, “Gottfried A. Gründler’s Der Naturforscher (1773)”

During the second half of the eighteenth century, there was a peak in the usage of elaborate frontispiece engravings for European naturalist periodicals. Gielas introduces the frontispiece created by the renowned German engraver Gottfried August Gründler (1710–1775) for the naturalist journal Der Naturforscher and examines the useful information it displayed to the periodical’s (potential) audience. The engraving can be seen as an illustration of the cultural identity of naturalists as well as the Enlightened individual in the later decades of the eighteenth century.

The Burlington Magazine, June 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 28, 2021

Charles-Louis Clérisseau, Traou en Dalmathia, 1757
(Paris: Bibliothèque nationale de France)

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The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (June 2021) — Works of Art on Paper

A R T I C L E S

• Ana Šverko, “Clérisseau’s Journey to Dalmatia: A Newly Attributed Collection of Drawings,” pp. 492–502.
A collection of 136 hitherto anonymous drawings of Italy, Istria and Dalmatia in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, is here attributed to Charles-Louis Clérisseau. The drawings, which include a group made during his journey from Venice to Diocletian’s Palace in Split with Robert Adam in 1757, further expand our understanding of Clérisseau as the forerunner of a new generation of traveller-painters.

• Tony Barnard, “Trading in Art: Antonio Cesare di Poggi (1744–1836),” pp. 492–502.
With the help of his English wife, Hester, the Italian artist A.C. Poggi forged a career in London as a portrait painter, a retailer of fans, a dealer principally in drawings and publisher of prints. Poggi’s successes and failures reflect changing fashions and fortunes in the capital’s competitive art world between his arrival in England c.1770 and departure for the Continent in 1801.

• Christopher White, “Reminiscences of the British Museum Print Room, 1954–65,” pp. 492–502.
The author’s first job, as Assistant Keeper with responsibility for the Northern schools in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, London, introduced him to a distinguished group of curators and an occasionally eccentric band of visitors. The department’s focus was emphatically on drawings, where major acquisitions could be made by sharp-eyed scholars in the salesrooms.

Fan portraying George III and his family at the Royal Academy of Arts exhibition in 1788, made by A.C. Poggi incorporating a print by Pietro Antonio Martini after J. H. Ramberg, ca. 1790, engraved and hand-coloured paper with carved and pierced ivory sticks and guards, width when open 38.4 cm (London: Victoria and Albert Museum, T.56-1933).

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R E V I E W S

• Elizabeth Pergam, “The Frick Reframed,” pp. 536–39. On the plain, grey walls of the Modernist Breuer building, New York, some of the most famous works from the Frick Collection shine in a new light.

• Yuriko Jackall, Review of the exhibition catalogue Une des Provinces du Rococo: La Chine Rêvée de François Boucher, ed. by Yohan Rimaud and Alastair Laing (In Fine éditions d’art and Musée des beaux-arts et d’archéologie de Besançon, 2019), pp. 539–41.

• Jonathan Yarker, Review of the exhibition Turner’s Modern World (Tate Britain, 2020–21), pp. 541–44.

• Amanda Dotseth, Review of the exhibition publication Museo del Prado 1819–2019: Un lugar de memoria, ed. by Javier Portús et al (Prado, 2018), pp. 546–49.

• Simonetta Prosperi Valenti Rodinò, Review of Les dessins de la collection Mariette: Écoles italienne et espagnole, by Pierre Rosenberg et al, 4 vols., (Somogy, 2019), pp. 550–51.

• Oliver Tostmann, Review of Die Zeichnungen des Giovan Battista Beinaschi aus der Sammlung der Kunstakademie Düsseldorf am Kunstpalast, ed. by Sonja Brink and Francesco Grisolia (Imhof Verlag, 2020), pp. 556–57. [Beinaschi lived between 1636 and 1688, but Tostmann notes in passing points of his eighteenth-century reception.]

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of L’ Art et la manière: Dessins français du XVIIIesiècle des musées de Marseille, ed. by Luc Georget and Gérard Fabre (Silvana Editoriale, 2019), pp. 557–58.

Woman’s Art Journal, Spring / Summer 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 21, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of WAJ:

Woman’s Art Journal 42.1 (Spring / Summer 2021)

Marguerite Gérard, Portrait of a Man and Woman in an Interior, 1818 (Tulsa: Philbrook Museum of Art; Taber Art Fund, 2019.9). The painting sold at Christie’s in Paris on 28 October 2019, Sale 17655, Lot 751.

A R T I C L E S

• Sarah Lees, “Marguerite Gérard’s Portrait of a Man and a Woman in an Interior: Portraiture, Landscape, and Social Networks,” pp. 19–26.
• Alison M. Kettering, “Watercolor and Women in the Early Modern Netherlands: Between Mirror and Comb,” pp. 27–35.

R E V I E W S

• Rosie Razzall, Review of Angela Oberer, The Life and Work of Rosalba Carriera (1673–1757): The Queen of Pastel (Amsterdam University Press, 2020), pp. 44–46.
• Wendy Wassyng Roworth, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Angelica Kauffman, edited by Bettina Baumgärtel (Hirmer, 2020), pp. 46–48.

Print Quarterly, June 2021

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 5, 2021

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.2 (June 2021)

Jeanne-Elisabeth Chaudet, Portrait of a Young Girl, traditionally Identified as Madame Villot, née Barbier, Carrying Her Father’s Sabre, oil on canvas, likely shown at the Salon in 1817 (Private Collection).

A R T I C L E S

Claire Brisby, “Orthodox Prints in the Samokov Painter’s Archive”

Addressing the distinctive category of religious prints produced for the Orthodox Christian market from 1698 to 1864, Brisby’s article focuses on prints that once formed the image archive of the painter Christo Dimitrov and his son and other family members in Samokov, Bulgaria—prints that have received limited scholarly attention. The article discusses various sites of print production and explores the use of prints in workshops as models for frescoes and paintings.

N O T E S

F. Carlo Schmid, “Prints after the Antique up to 1869”

The exhibition catalogue Phönix aus der Asche: Bildwerdung der Antike – Druckgrafiken bis 1869 / L’Araba Fenice: L’Antico Visualizzato nella Grafica a Stampa fino al 1869, reviewed here by F. Carlo Schmid, explores the development of printed images concerning architecture, sculpture, and objects of everyday life of classical antiquity. The prints date from the fifteenth to the second half of the nineteenth century and relate to works from, but not limited to, Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. Of particular interest to eighteenth-century scholars, Schmid highlights that the original project out of which the exhibition and catalogue grew concerned Hadrian’s Villa at Tivoli as a “space of artistic interaction” in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Adamo Scultori (Ghisi), Young Prisoner, 1566–80, engraving.

Francisco J. R. Chaparro, “Spanish Drawing Books”

A note on the exhibition catalogue El Maestro de Papel reviewed here by Francisco J. R. Chaparro, presents a comprehensive review of the scholarly attention directed towards Spanish drawing books. Chaparro makes reference to the Matías de Irala 1731 work and mentions the poor survival of the books. Chaparro tracks the appearance and reappearance of Jusepe Ribera’s etchings dated 1622 to highlight the further issue of cross-reference in these works. The note provides a critique of the exhibition while firmly situating it as a cornerstone for further research on the field of Spanish prints and drawings.

Ellis Tinios, “Surimono from the Virginia Shawan Drosten and Patrick Kenadjian Collection”

A laudatory note by Ellis Tinios on the catalogue The Private World of Surimino presents a brief analysis of surimono prints and notes, for instance, the importance of adequate lighting in revealing the complexities of blind printing and reflective inks.

David Ekserdijan, “A Portrait by Jeanne-Elisabeth Chaudet and Its Source”

David Ekserdijan presents the unusual artistic inspiration behind Jeanne-Elisabeth Chaudet’s painting A Portrait of a Young Girl of 1817, which sold in a 2006 Sotheby’s auction. The note features a side-by-side comparison with Adamo Scultori’s Young Prisoner or An Allegory of Servitude of 1566–80.

 

The Burlington Magazine, March 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 24, 2021

The eighteenth century in The Burlington (I’m catching up, gradually!) . . . CH

The Burlington Magazine 163 (March 2021)

Hubert Robert, Arch of Septimius Severus, 1756; pen with grey and beige washes, 73 × 52 cm (Musée de Valence).

A R T I C L E S

•  Pedro Luengo, “Spatial Rhetoric: Echoes of Madrid’s Alcázar in Palaces Overseas,” pp. 236–43.
Several key features of the Alcazar in Madrid—including the twin-courtyard plan, double staircase, and layout of the royal chapel—were replicated in royal palaces in Spain and elsewhere and in the viceregal palaces in Spain’s American empire as part of a desire to project a unified imperial image.

•  Yuriko Jackall and Kari Rayner, “Becoming Hubert Robert: Some New Suggestions,” pp. 244–53.
The thin documentation of Hubert Robert’s early years makes it difficult to understand how the largely untrained student who went to Rome in 1754 emerged as a leading talent in Paris in the mid 1760s. Close examination of his art suggests that his rapid development was due to a rigorous course of study of perspective and life drawing, probably in response to criticisms of his abilities by the secretary of the Académie Royale, Charles-Nicolas Cochin.

R E V I E W S

• Michael Hall, Review of Matthew Reeve, Gothic Architecture and Sexuality in the Circle of Horace Walpole (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2020), pp. 264–69.

• Antonio Mazzotta, Review of the exhibition Tiepolo: Venezia, Milano, l’Europa (Milan: Gallerie d’Italia, 2020–21), pp. 273–75.

• Christoph Stiegemann, Review of the exhibition Passion, Leidenschaft: Die Kunst der großen Gefühle (Münster: LWL-Museum für Kunst und Kultur, 2020–21), pp. 275–78.

• Stephen Leach, Review of Matthew Craske, Joseph Wright of Derby: Painter of Darkness (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2020), pp. 297–98.

• Philippe Malgouyres, Review of Suzanne Higgott, ‘The Most Fortunate Man of his Day’: Sir Richard Wallace: Connoisseur, Collector, and Philanthropist (Wallace Collection, 2018), pp. 298–99.

• Elena Almirall Arnal, Review of Carolina Naya Franco, El joyero de la Virgen del Pilar: Historia de una colección de alhajas europeas y americanas (Institución Fernando El Católico, 2019), pp. 302–03.

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of Laura Windisch, Kunst, Macht, Image: Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici (1667–1743) im Spiegel ihrer Bildnisse und Herrschaftsräume (Böhlau Verlag, 2019), p. 303.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary of Carmen Garrido (1947–2020), pp. 305–06.
Director of the Gabinete de Documentación Técnica at the Prado for thirty years, Carmen Garrido made major contributions to the technical study of Spanish painting, in particular with her publications on Diego Velázquez.

• Ger Luijten, Obituary of David Scrase (1949–2020), pp. 306–08.
In a career spent almost entirely at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, David Scrase was responsible for numerous significant acquisitions and exhibitions. His magnum opus his his catalogue for the museum’s Italian drawings, published in 2011.

 

New Book | Pictured Politics

Posted in books, reviews by Editor on April 11, 2021

I’m sorry to be months late with this posting. See also Tara Zanardi’s review for Journal18 (November 2020) and Michael Schreffler’s review from caa.reviews (February 2021). CH

From the University of Texas Press:

Emily Engel, Pictured Politics: Visualizing Colonial History in South American Portrait Collections (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2020), 184 pages, ISBN: 978-1477320594, $60.

Featuring almost eighty illustrations from between 1590 and 1830, Pictured Politics is the sole study in English or Spanish to examine the role of portraiture in constructing the history of South American colonialism.

The Spanish colonial period in South America saw artists develop the subgenre of official portraiture, or portraits of key individuals in the continent’s viceregal governments. Although these portraits appeared to illustrate a narrative of imperial splendor and absolutist governance, they instead became a visual record of the local history that emerged during the colonial occupation.

Using the official portrait collections accumulated between 1542 and 1830 in Lima, Buenos Aires, and Bogotá as a lens, Pictured Politics explores how official portraiture originated and evolved to become an essential component in the construction of Ibero-American political relationships. Through the surviving portraits and archival evidence—including political treatises, travel accounts, and early periodicals—Emily Engel demonstrates that these official portraits not only belie a singular interpretation as tools of imperial domination but also visualize the continent’s multilayered history of colonial occupation. The first stand alone analysis of South American portraiture, Pictured Politics brings to light the historical relevance of political portraits in crafting the history of South American colonialism.

Emily Engel is an independent scholar based in Southern California who has published widely on visual culture in early modern South America. She is a coeditor of Manuscript Cultures of Colonial Mexico and Peru: New Questions and Approaches and A Companion to Early Modern Lima, as well as the founding associate editor of Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture.

C O N T E N T S

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Art and Authority in Late Colonial South American Portraiture
1  New Pictorial Practices: Early Official Portraits in Viceregal Peru
2  Visualizing Empire’s History: Royal Portraits in the Iberoamerican World
3  Picturing Viceregal Authority in the Lima City Council
4  Municipal Collecting: Viceregal Portraits in Bogotá and Buenos Aires
5  Portrayal in a Time of Transition: Early Nineteenth-Century Portraits
Epilogue: The Afterlife of Official Portraits

Notes
Bibliography
Index

 

Print Quarterly, March 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 12, 2021

Marco Carloni, Franciszek Smuglewicz, and Vincenzo Brenna, plate nine from Vestigia delle Terme di Tito e Loro Interne Pitture, 1776–78, hand-coloured etching (London: The British Museum).

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.1 (March 2021)

A R T I C L E S

Francesca Guglielmini, “Ludovico Mirri’s Vestigia and Publishing in Eighteenth-Century Rome”, pp. 29–49.

This article is a detailed study of the publishing activities and business model of the erudite antiquarian, art dealer and print publisher Ludovico Mirri (1738–1786). His ambitious project Vestigia delle Terme di Tito e Loro Interne Pitture (The Remains of the Baths of Titus and Their Paintings) is discussed in detail alongside eight previous unpublished images of hand-coloured etchings of grotesque wall decorations taken from antique ruins in Rome and surroundings, now in the British Museum, here proposed as an extension of the original Vestigia. Four appendices contain a compilation of uncoloured and coloured impressions of the Vestigia etchings; a description of the contents of the Vestigia and Giuseppe Carletti’s accompanying booklet; known copies of the Vestigia in public collections; and a list of supplementary plates, including those eight mentioned in the British Museum collection.

David Stoker, “The Marshall Family’s Print Publishing Business”, pp. 50–63.

This article explores the little researched late activities of the Dicey print publishing business which was run by members of the Marshall family into the nineteenth century after Cluer Dicey (1715–1775) retired in 1770. The article discusses various publications produced by each member of the Marshall family, from Dicey’s partner Richard Marshall (d. 1779) to his grandson John II Marshall (b. 1793).

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Antony Griffiths, Review of The Lost Library of the King of Portugal (2019), pp. 72–74.

This review sheds light on new research uncovered about the lost library of John V, King of Portugal, specifically archival documents. A significant portion of this review tells the fascinating story of how orders were sent to the Portuguese ambassadors in various European capitals in 1724 for an impression of every available print in those countries. These indeed happened but the various volumes of prints disappeared in the cataclysm of 1755, except for three volumes representing British, French, and Italian prints which were rediscovered in recent decades.

Domenico Pino, “Anton Maria Zanetti II and Limited Editions in Venice, c. 1734,” pp. 74–76.

This note seeks to interpret a handwritten inscription found on the verso of a print by Anton Maria Zanetti the Younger (1706–1778) in the British Museum. The inscription provides important evidence on early exploitation of limited editions in printmaking among the Zanetti clan and their contemporaries.

Antoinette Friedenthal, Review of La vita come opera d’arte: Anton Maria Zanetti e le sue collezioni (2018), pp. 108–14.

This review of an exhibition catalogue exploring Anton Maria Zanetti the Elder (1680–1767) offers an overview of his intellectual and artistic interests. His admiration for Parmigianino is discussed in detail, as well as his own reconstruction of the technique of chiaroscuro woodcuts. The review concludes with a few paragraphs on his forays into publishing.

Print Quarterly, December 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 12, 2020

Meissen bowl with leopard licking its paw, after engraving with six leopards (see below), part of Hanbury Williams service, ca. 1745, porcelain, diameter 340 mm.

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Malcolm Jones, “Early Modern English Prints in the Joseph Ames Album at the Morgan Library,” pp. 411–31.

This article publishes, for the first time, some of the contents of an album in the Morgan Library and Museum, New York, entitled Emblematical and Satirical Prints in Persons and Professions. Compiled around 1750 by Joseph Ames (1689–1759) and containing 237 miscellaneous European prints. About 125 are catalogued as English; 33 of these are unique or exceedingly rare examples and are discussed in detail throughout the article. The remaining English prints in the album are described in an appendix.

N O T E S  A N D  R EV I E W S

Anonymous artist, Six Leopards, from album with prints of animals published by Joos de Bosscher, 1581–1600, engraving, 125 x 177 mm (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum).

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, Review of Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre grafischen Vorlagen (2018), pp. 465–69.

This note reviews a two-volume publication about print sources for imagery on eighteenth-century Meissen porcelain. Where possible, the catalogue of 475 entries presents the names of the artists, engravers or publishers of Dutch, French, German, and Italian print sources used.

Tom Young, Review of Douglas Fordham, Aquatint Worlds: Travel, Print, and Empire, 1770–1820 (2019), pp. 470–74.

This note, and the book it reviews, emphasises the close ties the medium of aquatint has with British exploration and imperialism. Using J.R. Abbey’s (1894–1969) collection of aquatint travel books, today held by the Yale Center for British Art, the case studies show how aquatint’s advantages in colour and detail helped to convey antiquarian details with meticulous accuracy, but that it also had a broader impact on developing a community of taste dependent on travel and the recognition of difference.

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