Enfilade

Print Quarterly, September 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 2, 2020

Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, Double Portrait of Johann Elias Haid and Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, ca. 1778–84, oil on copper, 31 × 38 cm (image courtesy Boris Wilnitsky Fine Arts, Vienna).

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The eighteenth-century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly (with apologies for being so slow! -Craig).

Print Quarterly 37.3 (September 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Julie Mellby, “Audubon’s Copperplates for Birds of America”, pp. 283–93.

After a brief introduction to John James Audubon’s (1785–1851) life and the publication history of his famous Birds of America, this article explores the afterlife of the copperplates. Partly damaged during a fire and later sold as used copper, some of these objects were eventually acquired and restored by William E. Dodge II (1832–1903). Their history interestingly overlaps with the history of important American institutions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Princeton University Art Museum.

Marianne A. Yule, “A Friendship Portrait of J. J. Mettenleiter and J. E. Haid”, pp. 294–99.

This piece focuses on a newly discovered painting and its related mezzotint, the only known collaborative work between the printmaker John Elias Haid (1739–1809) and the painter Johann Jakob Mettenleiter (1750–1825). It explores the history of the image and identifies all the prints depicted therein.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Peter Van Der Coelen, Review of Henk van Nierop, The Life of Romeyn de Hooghe 1645–1708: Prints, Pamphlets, and Politics in the Dutch Golden Age (2018), pp. 314–16.

The note, as the book it reviews, sheds light on the lesser known, yet extremely prolific Romeyn de Hooghe (1645–1708), a printmaker operating between the Netherlands and Paris. His prints depict the political events of the day, such as the French invasion of Holland, as well as fashionable pastimes, as exemplified by his illustrations for a treatise on wrestling. De Hooghe’s life and work attest to the rising dominance of France all over Europe in the age of Louis XIV, both politically and artistically.

Domenico Pino, Review of Xavier F. Salomon, Andrea Tomezzoli and Denis Ton, Tiepolo in Milan: The Lost Frescoes of Palazzo Archinto (2019), pp. 319–21.

The catalogue under review reconstructs a cycle of frescoes commissioned for an aristocratic Milanese palace and destroyed during World War II. The note focuses on one chapter in particular, analysing Giambattista Tiepolo’s (1697–1770) early career as a book illustrator in Verona and Milan in the 1720s and ’30s, reading it in the context of the cultural fervour that spread all over Italy following the war of Spanish succession.

Domenico Pino, Review of Canaletto & Venezia (2019), pp. 321–22.

The note offers an overview of eighteenth-century Venice and the cultural fervour it hosted. The exhibition catalogue explores in detail the artistic career of Canaletto (1697–1768), Giambattista Tiepolo (1697–1770) and Giambattista Piazzetta (1682–1754), and discusses the developments of artistic trends in furniture, glass, porcelain and architecture in Venice throughout the century up to the fall of the Republic in 1797.

Elizabeth Rudy, Review of Aude Prigot, La Réception de Rembrandt à traversles estampes en France au XVIIIe siècle (2018), pp. 322–25.

The note explores the impact Rembrandt had on artists from the eighteenth through to the twenty-first century. In particular it focuses on the practice of collecting his prints in eighteenth-century France and that of copying his composition in the later part of the century. The main case studies are five French artists, among them Claude-Henri Watelet (1718–86) and Dominique Vivant-Denon (1747–1825).

Susan Tallman on Art History’s Loose Canons

Posted in books, reviews, site information by Editor on September 18, 2020

Willem van Haecht, Apelles Painting Campaspe, ca. 1630 (The Hague: Mauritshuis). Used as an illustration for Susan Tallman’s review in The New York Review of Books (24 September 2020).

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Note from the Editor

Thanks to all of you for your patience with postings that have grown far more irregular than I would have liked. My family and I have been well, though admittedly, diligence (generally) hasn’t been quite the virtue it was for me prior to COVID. I have good intentions of eventually resuming the regular rate of posts (more or less), though getting there may take some time (pandemic obviously continues to make regular parts of life, including teaching, more complicated). One realization I’ve had over the past few months: I’m much less excited generally about Enfilade in the absence of exhibitions. I don’t actually make it to that many exhibitions in a given year, a fraction of those listed on the site. And yet, exhibitions generate for me (even vicariously) lots of intellectual energy. To all of you who do that work in and with museums, I’m more grateful than ever. Thank you.

I experienced, however, a similar jolt of stimulation while reading the most recent issue of The New York Review of Books (24 September 2020). I love Susan Tallman’s review of Christopher Wood’s A History of Art History (Princeton UP, ) and Éric Michaud’s The Barbarian Invasions: A Genealogy of the History of Art (MIT Press, 2019). In addition to working as an engaging review, Tallman’s piece (“Who Decides What’s Beautiful?,” pp. 16–20) is one of the most concise, satisfying summaries of art history as a discipline I know of—effectively framing the discipline in relation to the ethical and moral stakes of this particular moment in time. Enfilade readers will likely find other reviews from the issue also of interest:

• David Bell on Maurice Samuels’s The Betrayal of the Duchess: The Scandal That Unmade the Bourbon Monarchy and Made France Modern (Basic Books, 2020).

• Kathryn Hughes on new studies of Wordsworth.

• Larry Wolff on Thomas Irvine’s Listening to China: Sound and the Sino-Western Encounter, 1770–1839 (University of Chicago Press, 2020).

• Leah Price on Anthony Grafton’s Inky Fingers: The Making of Books in Early Modern Europe (Belknap/Harvard UP, 2020) and Jordan Alexander Stein’s When Novels Were Books (Harvard UP, 2020).

Craig Hanson

 

Print Quarterly, June 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 20, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.2 (June 2020)

Rembrandt van Rijn, Portrait of Jan Six, 1647, etching, engraving, and drypoint, 244 × 191mm (Amsterdam: Rijksprentenkabinett).

A R T I C L E S

Antoinette Friedenthal, “Sketched, Not Etched: Jan Six and the Mariettes’ Rembrandt Oeuvre for Prince Eugene of Savoy,” pp. 140–51.

This article considers the compilation of the Rembrandt album originally produced for Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663–1736). Particular emphasis is placed on the attempts to procure a rare impression of Rembrandt’s Portrait of Jan Six. Reference to the correspondence of Jean Mariette (1660–1742) and Pierre Jean Mariette (1694–1774) on the matter and their draft catalogue reveals that the Prince’s etched Portrait of Jan Six is, in fact, a drawn copy after the print. This in turn serves to support the proposal that the Prince of Savoy’s Rembrandt album is not held in Dresden as previously thought, but instead in the Albertina in Vienna.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Helmut Gier, Review of New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Ulrich Kraus, Parts I–V, (2018–19), pp. 180–83.

The note provides an overview of the five New Hollstein volumes that bring together the corpus of Johann Ulrich Kraus (1655–1719). A prodigious printmaker and publisher, Kraus’s diverse output included commissions for various European courts, book illustrations, architectural treatises, and portraits. He is notable for sensitivity to, and amalgamation of, the latest French, Italian, Dutch, and German artistic trends.

Giorgio Marini, Review of Elisabetta Rizzioli, L’Officina di Leopoldo Cicognara: La Creazione delle Immagini per la ‘Storia della Scultura’ (2016), pp. 184–87.

Rizzioli’s book focuses on the art theorist and critic Francesco Leopoldo Cicognara (1767–1834), who “played a crucial role in the promotion of the arts from the Neoclassical period to the 1814–15 Congress of Vienna, relying on an international artistic community to which Antonio Canova (1757–1822) had introduced him.”

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Antonia Dosen, Dubravka Botica, Anamarija Stepanić, Andelika Galić, and Petra Milovac, eds., Architecture and Performance: Prints from the Cabinet of Louis XIV in the MUO Holdings, exhibition catalogue (Zagreb: Museum of Arts and Crafts, 2016), p. 204.

“With parallel Croatian and English texts, the well-illustrated Architecture and Performance is dedicated to three groups of prints that were part of the so-called Cabinet du Roi . . . the three volumes dedicated to the Louvre, the Tuileries, Versailles and the royal festivals.”

The Burlington Magazine, March 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 30, 2020

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 162 (March 2020) — Drawings

Luigi Valadier, Pyx, 1769–71, gilt silver, 22 × 11 cm, one of eighteen pieces of a pontifical mass service belonging to the cathedral of Portalegre, Portugal (Church of S. Miguel, Castelo Branco).

A R T I C L E S

• Teresa Leonor M. Vale “A Portuguese Bishop’s Pontifical Mass Service by Luigi Valadier,” pp. 196–203. A gilt silver pontifical mass service belonging to the cathedral of Portalegre, Portugal, is here identified as the work of the celebrated Roman silversmith Luigi Valadier and dated 1769–71. It is closely similar to a contemporary service owned by Cardinal Domenico Orsini and both services can be linked to a group of drawings from Valadier’s workshop.

S H O R T E R  N O T I C E S

Kee Il Choi, Jr., “Ornament from China: Sources for a Garden Folly Design by Jean-Jacques Lequeu,” pp. 216–19.

R E V I E W S

• Kirstin Kennedy, Review of Carolina Naya Franco, Joyas y alhajas del Alto Aragón: esmaltes y piedras preciosas de ajuares y tesoros históricos (2018).

• Stéphane Loire, Review of Nicola Spinosa, ed., Francesco Solimena (1657–1747) e le Arti a Napoli (2018).

• Aileen Dawson, Review of Claudia Bodinek (with contributions by Peter Braun, Tobias Pfeifer-Helke und Claudia Schnitzer), Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre Grafischen Vorlagen (2018).

• David Bindman, Review of the exhibition Canova Thorvaldsen: The Birth of Modern Sculpture (Milan: Gallerie d’Italia, 2019–20).

• Daniel Stewart, Review of the exhibition Troy: Myth and Reality (London: British Museum, 2019–20).

• Christiane Elster, Review of the exhibition History in Fashion: 1500 Years of Embroidery in Fashion (Leipzig: GRASSI Museum of Applied Arts, 2019–20).

• Philippa Glanville, Review of the exhibition Feast and Fast: The Art of Food in Europe, 1500–1800 (Cambridge: Fitzwilliam Museum, 2019–20)

• Kamila Kocialkowska, Review of the exhibition Peter the Great: Collector, Scholar, Artist (Moscow Kremlin Museums, 2019–20).

• Eckart Marchand, Review of the exhibition Near Life: The Gipsformerei: 200 Years of Casting Plaster (Berlin: James-Simon-Galerie, 2019–20).

Print Quarterly, March 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 10, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.1 (March 2020)

Antoine Trouvain and Pierre Lepautre after Bon Boullogne, Thesis Print of François Bourgarel for Mathematics, 1695, engraving, top 336 x 540 mm, bottom 462 x 540 mm (Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France).

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

• John Roger Paas, Review of Simon Turner, ed., The New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Stridbeck the Elder and the Younger, compiled by Dieter Beaujean and based on the research material of Josef H. Biller, parts 1–4 (Ouderkerk aan den IJssel: Sound & Vision Publishers, 2018), pp. 72–73.

The fact that artists are prolific and find a market in their lifetime is no guarantee that their work will enjoy critical acclaim in the long run or be avidly sought after by collectors. Such is the case of the Stridbecks, Johann the Elder (1641–1716) and Johann the Younger (1666–1714), Augsburg printmakers active from the late seventeenth century to the second decade of the eighteenth. . . . [But] their prints help to give us a deeper understanding of the print market and of public taste at the time, and we are fortunate that the more than a thousand prints of the Stridbecks have now been carefully collected and catalogued.

• Louis Marchesano, Review of Véronique Meyer, Pour la plus grand gloire du roi: Louis XIV en theses (Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2017), pp. 73–75.

This book provides an insightful account of the thesis print phenomenon by focusing on prints dedicated to the French king. It explores the function of these prints in the candidate’s life at university and outside, the production, reception and diffusion of the sheets and analyses the king’s image and its evolution in the period from his birth in 1638 to his death in 1715.

• Niklas Leverenz, “Isidore-Stanislas Helman and J. Pélicier,” pp. 75–76.

This short note focuses on a recently discovered signature of J. Pélicier on the proof state of a 1787 print previously attributed to Isidore-Stanislas Helman (1742–1809). This evidence suggests that Helman must have relied on a team of etchers for his large body of work, unusually allowing some of them to put their name on the plates.

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

• Who is Who Chez les Colbert? La collection d’estampes de Joseph de Colbert, exhibition catalogue (Sceaux: Musée du Domaine départemental de Sceaux / Ghent: Éditions Snoeck, 2019), p. 96.

• Sandra Pisot, ed., Goya, Fragonard, Tiepolo: Die Freiheit der Malerei, exhibition catalogue (Hamburg: Hamburger Kunsthalle / Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2019), p. 96.

• Laurent Baridon, Jean-Philippe Garric, and Martial Guédron, eds., Jean-Jacques Lequeu: Bâtisseur des Fantasmes, exhibition catalogue (Paris: Petit Palais, Bibliothèque Nationale de France / Éditions Norma, 2018), p. 97.

J. Pélicier, Emperor Qianlong Welcoming the Elderly Citizens of his Empire for a Celebration in their Honour, 1787, etching, 303 x 428 mm (Private Collection).

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, March 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 6, 2020

In the latest issue of the Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies:

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 43.1 (March 2020).

A R T I C L E S

• Amanda Vickery, “Branding Angelica: Reputation Management in Late Eighteenth‐Century England,” 3–24.
• Alberto del Campo Tejedor, “The Barber of Enlightened Spain: On the Politics and Practice of Grooming a Modern Nation,” pp. 25–42.
• Ana Sáez‐Hidalgo, “Anglo‐Spanish Enlightenment: Joseph Shepherd, an English ‘ilustrado’ in Valladolid,” pp. 46–60.
• Robert W. Jones, “Elizabeth Sheridan’s Post‐Celebrity,” pp. 61–78.
• Jonathan Taylor, “‘Who Bravely Fights, and Like Achilles Bleeds’: The Ideal of the Front‐Line Soldier during the Long Eighteenth Century,” pp. 79–100.

E D I T E D  M A N U S C R I P T S

• Jessica Wen Hui Lim, “Barbauld’s Lessons: The Conversational Primer in Late Eighteenth‐Century British Children’s Literature,” 101–20.

R E V I E W S

• Madeleine Pelling, Review of Susanna Avery‐Quash and Kate Retford, eds., The Georgian London Town House: Building, Collecting and Display, pp. 121–22.
• Megan Kitching, Review of Keith Michael Baker and Jenna Gibbs, eds., Life Forms in the Thinking of the Long Eighteenth Century, pp. 122–24.
• Charlotte Fletcher, Review of Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux, The Pocket: A Hidden History of Women’s Lives, 1660–1900, pp. 124–25.
• Hannah Hutchings‐Georgiou, Review of Andrew Carpenter, ed., The Poems of Olivia Elder, pp. 125–26.
• Thomas Lalevée, Review of Gabriel Galice and Christophe Miqueu, eds., Rousseau, la république, la paix: actes du colloque du GIPRI (Grand‐Saconnex, 2012), pp. 126–28.
• Helen Metcalfe, Review of Sally Holloway, The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture, pp. 128–29.
• Olive Baldwin Thelma Wilson, Review of Berta Joncus, Kitty Clive, or The Fair Songster, pp. 129–31.
• Joachim Whaley, Review of Claudia Keller, Lebendiger Abglanz: Goethes Italien‐Projekt als Kulturanalyse, pp. 131–32.
• Ben Wilkinson‐Turnbull, Review of A. C. Elias, John Irwin Fischer, and Panthea Reid, eds., Jonathan Swift’s Word‐Book: A Vocabulary Compiled for Esther Johnson and Copied in Her Own Hand, pp. 132–33.
• Max Skjönsberg, Review of Margaret Watkins, The Philosophical Progress of Hume’s Essays, pp. 133–35.

The Burlington Magazine, February 2020

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on February 28, 2020

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 162 (February 2020) — Northern European Art

Anton von Maron, Portrait of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, 1767, oil on canvas, 136 × 99 cm (Weimar: Stadtschloss).

E D I T O R I A L

• “The National Trust at 125,” p. 87.

A R T I C L E S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “A Bavarian Pilgrimage Shrine in Seventeenth-Century Paraguay,” pp. 115–25. The Jesuit priest Anton Sepp was one of the first Germanic missionaries to be admitted to the Spanish territories in South America. Arriving in 1691, he brought with him a copy of the miracle-working sculpture of the Virgin of Altötting in Bavaria, and in 1697 he emphasised the German character of his mission by commissioning a version of the octagonal chapel in which the original was housed.

• Clare Hornsby, “J. J. Winckelmann and the Society of Antiquaries of London: New Documents,” pp. 126–35. Three new documents in the archive of the Society of Antiquaries, published here for the first time, provide evidence about Winckelmann’s aspirations for promoting his works in antiquarian circles in England. They include the first statement in English of his theory of art history, written in 1761.

R E V I E W S

• Arthur Wheelock, Review of the exhibition De Wind is Op!: Climate, Culture and Innovation in Dutch Maritime Painting (New Bedford Whaling Museum, 2019–20), pp. 150–52.

• Olivier Bonfait, Review of Gaëtane Maës, De l’expertise artistique à la vulgarisation au siècle des Lumières: Jean-Baptiste Descamps (1715–1791) et la peinture flamande, hollandaise et allemande (Brepols, 2016), pp. 171–72.

• Anna Arabindan Kesson, Review of Sarah Thomas, Witnessing Slavery: Art and Travel in the Age of Abolition (Yale University Press, 2019), pp. 172–74.

 

The Burlington Magazine, December 2019

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 23, 2019

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 161 (December 2019)

A R T I C L E S

• François Marandet, “A Modello by James Thornhill for Addiscombe House, Surrey,” pp. 1028–33. An oil sketch in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Rouen, is here identified as James Thornhill’s modello for the ceiling painting of the staircse hall at Addiscombe House, near Croyden, begun c.1702 and demolished in the 1860s. It depicts the classical gods as an allegory of the days of the week.

R E V I E W S

• Charles Avery, Review of the exhibition Forged in Fire: Bronze Sculpture in Florence under the Last Medici (Palazzo Pitti, 2019–20), pp. 1044–47.

• David Bindman, Review of the exhibition, Hogarth: Cruelty and Humor (Morgan Library and Museum, 2019), pp. 1047–48.

• Brian Allen, Review of the exhibition Hogarth: Place and Progress (Sir John Soane’s Museum, 2019–20), pp. 1048–51.

• Emily M. Weeks, Review of the exhibition Inspired by the East: How the Islamic World Influenced Western Art (British Museum, 2019–20), pp. 1051–53.

• Xavier F. Salomon, Review of the exhibition Luigi Valadier: Splendour in Eighteenth-Century Rome (Galleria Borghese, 2019–20), pp. 1053–55.

• Clare Hornsby, Review of Robin Simon and MaryAnne Stevens, eds., The Royal Academy of Arts: History and Collections (Yale University Press, 2018) and Nicholas Savage, Burlington House: Home of the Royal Academy of Arts (Royal Academy of Arts, 2018), pp. 1060–61.

• Jörg Zutter, Review of Chris Fischer, Venetian Drawings: Italian Drawings in the Royal Collection of Graphic Art (Statens Museum fur Kunst, National Gallery of Denmark, 2018), p. 1064.

• Thomas Stammers, Review of Charlotte Guichard, La griffe du peintre: La valeur de l’art, 1730–1820 (Seuil, 2018), pp. 1066–67.

• Richard Stephens, Review of Wayne Franits, Godefridus Schalcken: A Dutch Painter in Late Seventeenth-Century London (Amsterdam University Press, 2018), p. 1074.

O B I T U A R Y

• Anthony Geraghty, Kerry Downes (1930–2019), p. 1075.

Print Quarterly, December 2019

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 4, 2019

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 36.4 (December 2019)

Étienne Fessard and Augustin de Saint-Aubin, after Charles Natoire, Gaetano Brunetti, and Paolo Antonio Brunetti, Perspective View of the Chapel of Enfants Trouvés in Paris, 1759, etching and engraving, sheet (trimmed) 80 × 59 cm (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art).

A R T I C L E S

Rena M. Hoisington, “Étienne Fessard’s Prints of the Chapel of the Hôpital des Enfants Trouvés in Paris,” pp. 404–25.

Soon after Charles Natoire (1700–1777) completed his cycle of paintings for the Chapel of the Hôpital des Enfants Trouvés in Paris, Fessard announced a subscription plan for a series of prints reproducing them. Often addressed merely for their documentary value, these prints are here analysed as objects in themselves. The article explores their complex publication history and assesses them in the context of Fessard’s career. Also analysed is the series’ repercussion on the reputation of the artists involved in their realization, Natoire included.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Colin Harrison, Review of Peter Whitfield, Oxford in Prints: 1675–1900 (Bodleian Library, 2016), p. 448.

The book explores how Oxford has been pictured between 1675 and 1922 by illustrating a selection of volumes in the collection of the Bodleian Library. The largest group consists of almanacks printed by the University, which took their definitive format of a topographical headpiece with a calendar beneath in the early eighteenth century.

Jean Michel Massing, Review of Cheryl Finley, Committed to Memory: The Art of the Slave Ship Icon (Princeton University Press, 2018), p. 484–88.

The book “focuses on the life, and afterlife, of  famous anti-slavery icon,” the 1788 engraved Plan of an African Ship’s lower Deck with Negroes in the proportion of only one to a Ton (484). Part One “considers abolitionist slave ship prints from the period 1788 to 1900; the remainder of the book is devoted to their stature as an icon reappropriated by twentieth-century African American, British and African artists” (488).

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Mungo Campbell and Nathan Flis, eds., William Hunter and the Anatomy of the Modern Museum, exhibition catalogue (Yale Center for British Art, and The Hunterian, University of Glasgow, in association with Yale University Press, 2018), p. 472.

The Burlington Magazine, August 2019

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on September 9, 2019

The August issue of The Burlington was especially rich for the eighteenth century; apologies for not posting it much sooner, but it’s worth noting. CH

The Burlington Magazine 161 (August 2019)

E D I T O R I A L

• “At the Yale Center for British Art,” p. 619. At the end of June Amy Meyers stepped down as Director of the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, after seventeen years.

A R T I C L E S

• Sam Rose, “Peer Review in Art History,” pp. 621–25. A more recent development than is often realized, and historically imposed in a variety of ways, peer review is a fundamental but rarely discussed aspect of academic life. What impact does it have on publishing in art history?

• Alexander Echlin, “Was Lord Burlington a Jacobite?,” pp. 626–37. A thesis first put forward thirty years ago that Lord Burlington was a Jacobite, who used buildings and gardens to express his clandestine views, has won a measure of support. However, the biographical evidence is circumstantial and the architectural evidence is so ambiguous that it cannot sustain the argument.

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “Buenos Aires Cathedral in the Eighteenth Century,” pp. 638–47. Greatly altered in the early eighteenth century, the original appearance of the interior of Buenos Aires Cathedral, designed by Antonio Masella and completed by Manuel Álvarez de Rocha in 1771, is here reconstructed from newly identified visual sources, a watercolour of c.1830 and nineteenth-century photographs.

• Alexandra Gajewski and Michael Hall, “The Fate of Notre-Dame, Paris,” pp. 648–52. The first at Notre-Dame in April destroyed its largely medieval roof and the flèche designed by Violeet-le-Duc as well as badly damaging the vaults. Plans for repairs depend on an assessment of the long-term structural damage to the cathedral, despite which a five-year timetable for the restoration has been imposed by President Macron and a competition for a replacement flèche initiated.

• Giovan Battista Fidanza, “New Evidence for the ‘Barberini Apostles’ by Andrea Sacchi and Carlo Maratti,” pp. 653–59. Unpublished documents in the Barberini Archives in the Vatican Library clarify the patronage, authorship, and dating of a celebrated series of nine paintings of the Apostles commissioned from Andrea Sacchi and Carlo Maratti by Cardinals Antonio Barberini the Younger and Carlo Barberini.

R E V I E W S

• Simon Lee, Review of the exhibitions The Majesties’ Retiring Room and A Painting for a Nation: The Execution of Torrijos (Prado, 2019), pp. 673–76.

• John Bold, Review of Matthew Walker, Architects and Intellectual Culture in Post-Restoration England (Oxford University Press, 2017), pp. 688–89.

• Anthony Colantuono, Review of Claire Farago, Janis Bell and Carlo Vecce, The Fabrication of Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘Trattato della pittura’ (Brill, 2018), pp. 693–95.

• Sandra Miller, Review of Valerie Steele, ed., Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Colour (Thames & Hudson, 2018), pp. 701–02.