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Print Quarterly, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 23, 2017

The current issue of Print Quarterly includes several items relevant to the long eighteenth century:

Print Quarterly 34.2 (June 2017)

Philibert-Louis Debucourt, National Almanac Dedicated to the Friends of the Constitution, 1790, aquatint and etching, 42.5 × 33.5 cm (Paris, Archives Nationales).

A R T I C L E S
• Lucia Simonato, “Cornelis Bloemaerts’s Estate Inventory and his Final Years,” pp. 150–61.

N O T E S
• Deborah L. Crohn, “Festival Prints (The Edible Monument),” pp. 199–201.
• Elmer Kolfin, “Coloured Prints (Afsetters en meester–afsetters: De kunst van het kleuren 1480–1720),” pp. 203–05.
• Deborah Howard, “Lost in Translation: Reinterpretation of Architectural Treatises (Traduire l’architecture),” pp. 207–09.
• Christiane Wiebel, “Karoline Luise von Baden as Collector,” pp. 209–11.
• John E. Moore, “Piranesi’s Published Books,” pp. 211–14.
• Kristel Smentek, “Ephemera in Revolutionary France (The Politics of the Provisional),” pp. 214–16.
• Martin Myrone, “William Blake (1757–1827),” pp. 217–18.
• Katarina Klaric, “Adam Buck (1759–1833),” pp. 218–21.

R E V I E W S
• Sheila O’Connell, “The Land of Cockayne and the Joys of Matrimony,” pp. 231–34.

A full contents list is available here»

 

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Journal of Art Historiography, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 6, 2017

Selection of articles from the current issue of the Journal of Art Historiography most relevant to the eighteenth century:

Journal of Art Historiography 16 (June 2017)

The Limits of Connoisseurship: Guest Edited by Valérie Kobi

Valérie Kobi (Bielefeld University), “The Limits of Connoisseurship: Attribution Issues and Mistakes, An Introduction.”

David Pullins (The Frick Collection), “The Individual’s Triumph: The Eighteenth-Century Consolidation of Authorship and Art Historiography.”

Portuguese Art Historiography

Edward J. Sullivan (New York University), “Portuguese Art History: A View from North America.”

Foteini Vlachou (Instituto de História Contemporânea, Lisbon), “The Discourse on Utility: Art Theory in Eighteenth-Century Portugal.”

Reviews

Ingrid R. Vermeulen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam), Review of Kristel Smentek, Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Ashgate, 2014).

 

Art History, June 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on May 23, 2017

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Art History:

Art History 40.3 (June 2017)

A R T I C L E S

Louis-Michel Van Loo, Carle Van Loo and His Family, 1757; oil on canvas, 200 × 156 cm (Musée National du Château de Versailles).

• Emma Barker, ” ‘No Picture More Charming’: The Family Portrait in Eighteenth-Century France,” pp. 526–53.

During the eighteenth century, so it is conventionally argued, the family portrait underwent a decisive transformation. Hitherto stiff and formal, such pictures took on a new informality and intimacy in response to the rise of a new set of domestic ideals. In the case of French family portraiture, this narrative has continued to be rehearsed in a largely uncritical way. What has not been adequately grasped to date is the way that such pictures functioned to legitimate the sitters and, more particularly, the male head of the family in the eyes of an external beholder. Although sometimes commissioned by a royal or noble family in response to a dynastic crisis, they most often functioned to consolidate the social ascent of wealthy commoners. The changes that the family portrait underwent during this period are bound up with the shift of political authority away from the absolute monarch towards the public sphere.

R E V I E W S

• Michael Schreffler, Review of Ananda Cohen Suarez, Heaven, Hell, and Everything in Between: Murals of the Colonial Andes (University of Texas Press, 2016), pp. 672–74.

• T. A. Heslop, Review of Christy Anderson, Anne Dunlop, and Pamela H. Smith, eds., The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logics, c. 1250–1750 (Manchester University Press, 2014), pp. 681–82.

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The Burlington Magazine, April 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on April 29, 2017

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 159 (April 2017)

AR T I C L E S
• Susan M. Wager, “The Earliest Known Version of Madame de Pompadour’s Suite d’Estampes Rediscovered,” pp. 285–89.
• Elizabeth Darrow, “The Art of Conservation: X Pietro Edwards: The Restorer as Philosophe,” pp. 308–17.

R E V I E W S
• Owen Hopkins, Review of Angelo Hornak, After the Fire: London Churches in the Age of Wren, Hooke, Hawksmoore, and Gibbs (Pimpernel Press, 2016), pp. 323–24.
• Giles Waterfield, Review of Burton Fredericksen, The Burdens of Wealth: Paul Getty and His Museum (Archway Publishing, 2015), p. 325.
• Teresa Leonor M. Vale, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Alvar Gonzalez Palacios, I Valadier: L’album dei disegni del museo napoleonico (Museo Napoleonico di Roma, 2015), p. 328.
• Richard Green, Review of Stephen Lloyd, ed., Art, Animals and Politics: Knowsley and the Earls of Derby (Unicorn Press, 2015), p. 328.

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Print Quarterly, March 2017

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on April 20, 2017

Antoine Masson, after Titian, Supper at Emmaus, second half of the seventeenth century, engraving, 452 x 586 mm
(London: The British Museum).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Foremost among the several items in the current issue of Print Quarterly relevant to the eighteenth century is an article by Thomas Frangenberg addressing Franz Christoph von Scheyb (1704–77) on the art of engraving. Von Scheyb’s unusual detailed discussion of a print by Antoine Masson (1636–1700) after Titian demonstrates the sophistication with which aspects of reproductive prints could be articulated during this period, revealing prints’ merits and shortcomings, both as sources of art history and works of art in their own right. The issue also includes shorter reviews on books about Tiepolo, Piazzetta, and Novelli in the context of the eighteenth-century Venetian illustrated book; drawings and prints after the antique; and prints by Luigi Rossini (1790–1857).

Print Quarterly 34.1 (March 2017)

A R T I C L E S
• Thomas Frangenberg, “Franz Christoph von Scheyb on the Art of Engraving,” pp. 32–41

N O T E S
• Viccy Coltman, “Drawn from the Antique: Artists & the Classical Ideal,” pp. 70–72.
• Giorgio Marini, “Book Illustration in Eighteenth-Century Venice (Tiepolo, Piazzetta, Novelli: L’incanto del libro illustrato nel Settecento Veneto), pp. 73–76.
• David R. Marshall, “Luigi Rossini 1790–1857,” pp. 76–77.

A full contents list is available here»

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The Burlington Magazine, December 2016

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 22, 2016

The eighteenth century in The Burlington (the issue is dedicated to ‘Art in Britain’):

201612-coverThe Burlington Magazine 158 (December 2016)

A R T I C L E S
• Lydia Hamlett, “Pandora at Petworth House: New Light on the Work and Patronage of Louis Laguerre,” pp. 950–55.
• Jennifer Melville, “Lady Forbes of Monymusk: A Rediscovered Portrait by Joshua Reynolds,” pp. 956–60.
• Brendan Cassidy, “A Portrait by Gavin Hamilton: Sir John Henderson of Fordell,” pp. 961–63.
• Alex Kidson, “David Solkin’s Art in Britain, 1660–1815 (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015),” pp. 964–67.

L E T T E R S
• Peter Lindfield, “A Further Allusion to Strawberry Hill at Lee Priory, Kent,” p. 979.
• Nicholas Penny, “Hugh Honour,” p. 979.

R E V I E W S
• Susanna Avery-Quash, Review of Lucilla Burn, The Fitzwilliam Museum: A History (Philip Wilson Publishers, 2016), p. 980.
• Greg Smith, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Tim Barringer and Oliver Fairclough, Pastures Green & Dark Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape (Giles, 2014), pp. 981–82.
• Barry Bergdoll, Review of Stefan Koppelkamm, The Imaginary Orient: Exotic Buildings of the 18th and 19th Centuries in Europe (Axel Munges, 2015), p. 982.
• Giles Waterfield, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Victoria Avery, Melissa Calaresu, and Mary Laven, eds., Treasured Possessions from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (Philip Wilson Publishers, 2015), p. 988.
• Malcolm Bull, Review of the exhibition In the Light of Naples: The Art of Francesco de Mura (Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park, 2016; Chazen Museum, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2017; The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, 2017), pp. 1006–07.

S U P P L E M E N T
• Tim Knox, “Recent Acquisitions (2012–16) at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge,” pp. 1017–28.

Anglo-Indian desk. Production Place: Vizagapatam, near Madras, in Southern India. Rosewood inlaid with finely engraved ivory, with silver handles, c.1750-1760. On loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge from Lady Hayter since March 2012. Belonged to Sir Thomas Rumbold, 1st Baronet (1736-1791), a British administrator in India.

The Rumbold Desk, by an unknown craftsman from Vizagapatam, Southern India, ca. 1750–60, rosewood inlaid with ivory, silver handles, 76 × 113 × 62 cm. Accepted in Lieu of Inheritance Tax by HM Government and allocated to the Fitzwilliam Museum, 2016 (M.3–2016). This Anglo-Indian desk has been on loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge since 2012 and is one of the finest of a very small group of similar desks made for British patrons in India at Vizagapatam (near Madras), a centre for the manufacture of such luxurious ivory-inlaid furniture. It belonged to Sir Thomas Rumbold, 1st baronet (1736–91), a British administrator in India, who amassed a great fortune in the service of the East India Company and served as Governor of Madras from 1777 to 1780. 

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The Burlington Magazine, November 2016

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 28, 2016

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

201611-coverThe Burlington Magazine 158 (November 2016)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucia Simonato, “A New Work by Domenico Guidi: The Bust of Cardinal Gianfrancesco Albani,” pp. 885–90.
• Bent Sørensen, “The Parisian Career of Jacques François Saly, 1749–53,” pp. 891–99.

L E T T E R

• Kim Legate, “More on Chippendale at Hestercombe House,” p. 904.

R E V I E W S

• Anthony Geraghty, Review of Owen Hopkins, From the Shadows: The Architecture and Afterlife of Nicholas Hawksmoor (Rekation Books, 2015), p. 907–08.
• Tessa Murdoch, Review of Malcolm Baker, The Marble Index: Roubiliac and Sculptural Portraiture in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015), p. 908.
• Martin Postle, Review of James Ayres, Art, Artisans, and Apprentices: Apprentice Painters and Sculptors in the Early Modern British Tradition (Oxbow Books, 2014), p. 909.
• Loyd Grossman, Review of Susan Rather, The American School: Artists and Status in the Late-Colonial and Early National Era (Yale University Press, 2016), pp. 909–10.
• François Quiviger, Review of Andrea Daninos, Una Rivoluzione di Cera: Francesco Orso e e i «cabinets de figures» in Francia (Officina Libraria, 2016), pp. 911–12.
• Philip Ward-Jackson, Review of Vanessa Brett, Bertrand’s Toyshop in Bath: Luxury Retailing, 1685–1765 (Oblong Creative, 2014), p. 912.
• Jamie Mulherron, Review of the exhibition Marseille au XVIIIe siècle: Les années de l’Académie, 1753–1793 (Le Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille, 2016), pp. 921–23.
• Jeremy Warren, Review of the exhibition Splendida Minima (Tesoro dei Granduchi, Palazzo Pitti, Florence, 2016), pp. 923–24. [Includes the eighteenth-century reception of these small-scale sculptures.]

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Journal18, #1 Multilayered (Spring 2016)

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on April 1, 2016

The inaugural issue of J18 is now available!

Issue1_CoverJournal18, #1 Multilayered (Spring 2016)

A R T I C L E S

• David Pullins, “Stubbs, Vernet & Boucher Share a Canvas: Workshops, Authorship & the Status of Painting”
•  Charlotte Guichard, “Scratched Surfaces: Artists’ Graffiti in Eighteenth-Century Rome”
• Kristel Smentek, “China and Greco-Roman Antiquity: Overture to a Study of the Vase in Eighteenth-Century France”
• Dipti Khera, “Marginal, Mobile, Multilayered: Painted Invitation Letters as Bazaar Objects in Early Modern India”

Art history’s material turn, informed by anthropology, material culture, and consumption studies, has prompted new interest in both the physicality and the social lives of artworks. Examining the ways that eighteenth-century art objects were produced, transported, and transformed helps us to understand how they were perceived and reimagined in different cultural and temporal contexts. In the workshops and collective spaces of artistic design and manufacture, objects became the creative products of many minds and many hands, simultaneously and successively. Likewise in their afterlives as commodities and possessions, objects were continually altered through use and re-use, each transaction constituting a reframing—sometimes literal—as objects inhabited new settings or were subjected to damage, aging, or rejuvenation.

This inaugural issue of Journal18 explores the multilayered nature of eighteenth-century art. Our focus is on artworks that bear traces of multiple hands as a result of workshop production, cross-cultural exchange, re-use, restoration, vandalism, or other factors. Among the questions considered are: who were the many people involved in art’s production and reproduction (artists, collectors, scholars, dealers, handlers, and restorers)? How were eighteenth-century artworks made, re-purposed, transported, and conserved? How were they translated across media as well as across time, space, and culture? And what is the creative effect of non-creative acts like accidents or defacement? By taking a ‘multilayered’ approach, the articles in this issue not only reexamine traditional art-historical categories—such as style, originality, or authorship—but also encourage new methodological perspectives and find new meaning in the materiality of art objects.

N O T E S  &  Q U E R I E S

Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV – by Robert Wellington
Qing Encounters – by Craig Clunas
A Lacquered Past: The Making of Asian Art in the Americas – by Sylvia Houghteling
Castiglione and China: Marking Anniversaries – by Kristina Kleutghen
A Digitally Usable Period Room – by Anne Higonnet
Ornamenting Louis XIV – by Sarah Grant
Pastel will Travel. Liotard at the Royal Academy – by Francesca Whitlum-Cooper
Ceci n’est pas un portrait: A Curator’s Diary – by Melissa Percival
China in Wonderland – by Michelle Wang
Shock Dog! New Sculpture at the Met – by Paris Amanda Spies-Gans

Issue Editors
Noémie Etienne, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles
Meredith Martin, NYU and Institute of Fine Arts
Hannah Williams, Queen Mary University of London

Cover image: Detail of Louis-Léopold Boilly, Trompe l’œil, ca. 1804–07. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

The Burlington Magazine, November 2015

Posted in journal articles, reviews by Editor on November 19, 2015

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 157 (November 2015)

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Interior of the Church of Santiago de Surco, Lima, Peru, attributed by Gauvin Alexander Bailey to Johann Rehr and Santiago Rosales, before 1759–1773.

A R T I C L E S

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, “The Fantastical Rococo Altarpieces of Santiago de Surco, Peru,” pp. 769–75.

R E V I E W S

• Simon Swynfen Jervis, Review of Giuseppe Beretti and Alvar González-Palacios, Giuseppe Maggiolini: Catalogo ragionato dei disegni (In Limine, 2014) and Michael Sulzbacher, Peter Atzig, Sabine Schneider, and Karsten Hommel, Friedrich Gottlob Hoffmann (Grassi Museum, 2014), pp. 790–91.

• David Bindman, Review of William Pressly, James Barry’s Murals at the Royal Society of Arts: Envisioning a New Public Art (Cork University Press, 2014), pp. 791–92.

• Richard Green, Review of Christopher Wright, The Schorr Collection of Old Master and Nineteenth-Century Paintings (The Schorr Collection, 2014), pp. 792–93.

• David Pullins, Review of Carolyn Weekley, Painters and Paintings in the Early American South (Yale University Press, 2013), p. 795.

New Book | Figures Publiques: L’invention de la Célébrité, 1750–1850

Posted in books, reviews by Editor on September 20, 2015

From Fayard:

Antoine Lilti, Figures Publiques: L’invention de la Célébrité, 1750–1850 (Paris: Fayard, 2014), 436 pages, ISBN: 978-2213682389, 24€.

9782213682389-X_0Bien avant le cinéma, la presse à scandale et la télévision, les mécanismes de la célébrité se sont développés dans l’Europe des Lumières, puis épanouis à l’époque romantique sur les deux rives de l’Atlantique. Des écrivains comme Voltaire, des comédiens comme Garrick, des musiciens comme Liszt furent de véritables célébrités, suscitant la curiosité et l’attachement passionné de leurs « fans ». À Paris comme à Londres, puis à Berlin et New York, l’essor de la presse, les nouvelles techniques publicitaires et la commercialisation des loisirs entraînèrent une profonde transformation de la visibilité des personnes célèbres. On pouvait désormais acheter le portrait de chanteurs d’opéra et la biographie de courtisanes, dont les vies privées devenaient un spectacle public. La politique ne resta pas à l’écart de ce bouleversement culturel : Marie-Antoinette comme George Washington ou Napoléon furent les témoins d’un monde politique transformé par les nouvelles exigences de la célébrité. Lorsque le peuple surgit sur la scène révolutionnaire, il ne suffit plus d’être légitime, il importe désormais d’être populaire.

À travers cette histoire de la célébrité, Antoine Lilti retrace les profondes mutations de la société des Lumières et révèle les ambivalences de l’espace public. La trajectoire de Jean-Jacques Rousseau en témoigne de façon exemplaire. Écrivain célèbre et adulé, celui-ci finit pourtant par maudire les effets de sa « funeste célébrité », miné par le sentiment d’être devenu une figure publique que chacun pouvait façonner à sa guise. À la fois désirée et dénoncée, la célébrité apparaît comme la forme moderne du prestige personnel, adaptée aux sociétés démocratiques et médiatiques, comme la gloire était celle des sociétés aristocratiques. C’est pourtant une grandeur toujours contestée, dont l’histoire éclaire les contradictions de notre modernité.

Antoine Lilti est directeur d’études à l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales. Ses travaux portent sur l’histoire sociale et culturelle des Lumières. Il a notamment publié Le Monde des salons. Sociabilité et mondanité à Paris au xviiie siècle (Fayard, 2005).

For a review of the book, see Jessica Goodman, French Studies 69 (2015): 535–36.