Enfilade

Symposium | The Pleasures of the Historical Imagination

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on June 22, 2017

Attributed to Johann Zoffany, The Antique Room of the Royal Academy at New Somerset House, 1780–83
(London: Royal Academy of Arts)

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From the symposium schedule (which includes abstracts of the papers). . .

The Pleasures of the Historical Imagination: A Dialogue with John Brewer
European University Institute, Villa Salviati, Florence, 22–23 June 2017

Organized by Silvia Sebastiani, Matthew Hunter, and Fredrik Albritton Jonsson

John Brewer’s work has cut a wide swathe through political, cultural, and economic history. To mark his retirement from teaching, this symposium gathers his former students, interlocutors, and friends for an exchange of conversation, discussion, and convivial disagreement, along with an update from John on his current research. These twenty-one papers are not retrospective tributes in the manner of a traditional Festschrift but rather an occasion to report on exciting new findings in the many different fields touched by John’s scholarship.

T H U R S D A Y ,  2 2  J U N E  2 0 1 7

9.30  Welcome and Introduction

9.45  1. Politics and the State
Chair: Eckhart Hellmuth (Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, München)
• Joanna Innes (University of Oxford), Britain and the Liberation of Europe: Napoleon and After
• Paul Monod (Middlebury College), Eighteenth-Century European Politics: Ideology or Culture?
• Holly Brewer (University of Maryland), Creating a Fashion for Slavery in the Stuart Court(s)
• Kathleen Wilson (Stony Brook University), Provincializing Britain: English Theatre in an Imperial Public Sphere, or, Modernity at the Margins

11.15  General Discussion

12.15  Lunch

14.00  2. Cultural History
Chair: Arthur Legger (University of Amsterdam)
• Xenia von Tippelskirch (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Imagining the Italian Renaissance around 1900
• Sophie Maisonneuve (Université Paris Descartes/IIAC), Collecting Recorded Music, 1877–2017: From Document to Experience
• Alexis Schwarzenbach (Lucerne University), The Great Wave: Katagami, Mangas and Other Japanese Artefacts Exported to the West around 1900
• Michèle Cohen (UCL Institute of Education, University of London), The Grand Tour: Fashioning ‘Citizens of the World’ or ‘Worthy Citizens of England’?

15.00  General Discussion

16.00  Coffee Break

16.30  3. Art History and Visual Culture
Chair: Malcolm Baker (University of California Riverside)
• Davide Lombardo (NYU in Florence), Repressed? Daumier and the Massacres of June 1848: Drawings, Paintings, and Lithographs
• Flaminia Gennari Santori (Gallerie Nazionali d’Arte Antica di Palazzo Barberini e Palazzo Corsini), ‘Your Reader Is a Martian Who Understands Everything’: Readers, Viewers, and Visitors, Past and Present
• Mark Hallett (Paul Mellon Centre), The War of the Portraitists: Artistic Competition and the Dynamics of Exhibition Culture in Georgian London
• Matthew C. Hunter (McGill University), Thick Slicing: Frederic Edwin Church’s Actuarial Imagination

17.30  General Discussion

F R I D A Y ,  2 3  J U N E  2 0 1 7

10.00  4. Intellectual History and History of Science
Chair: Lawrence Klein (Unversity of Cambridge)
• Silvia Sebastiani (EHESS, Paris), At Tea with Madame Chimpanzee: A ‘société de spectacle’ in 1730s London
• Jan Albers (Independent Writer and Museum Consultant), ‘I Don’t Like History, But Do You Know What Happened Here?’ Writing a Cultural History of the Landscape
• Alexander Geppert (NYU), The Pleasures of the Imagination in Space, or: the Alien Contact Phenomenon
• Nick Wilding (Georgia State University), Forging the Moon

11.30  General Discussion

12.30  Lunch

14.00  5. Consumption and Economic History
Chair: Laurence Fontaine (CNRS)
• Fredrik Albritton Jonsson (The University of Chicago), Anthropocene History
• John Styles (University of Hertfordshire), Industrial Revolution: From Production to Consumption, and Back Again
• Dawn Lyon (University of Kent), What is a Fish Worth? Sensory Knowledge, Labour, and the Production of Value at Billingsgate Fish Market
• Frank Trentmann (Birkbeck, University of London), Material Histories: Scales, Objects, and Networks

15.00  General Discussion

16.00  Coffee Break

16.30  John Brewer, Remarks and new projects

17.00  Concluding Discussion

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Workshop | Landscapes of the Long 18th Century in South Asia

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on June 22, 2017

From H-ArtHist:

Landscapes of the Long 18th Century
Mediating Places, Powers, and Pasts in South Asia and Beyond
Forum Transregionale Studien and the Museum for Asian Art, Berlin, 21–23 June 2017

Organized by Dipti Khera and Hannah Baader

This workshop seeks to explore how painters, poets, historians, and intellectuals have imagined landscapes and urbanisms in and of early modern South Asia, particularly over the course of the long eighteenth century. The mediation of memory and place in pictorial and literary practices in this time period was shaped by aesthetic and philosophical ideas and an epistemic situation that had deeper genealogies in the subcontinent and the broader Asian and Islamic world. Nonetheless, images, moods and ideologies encapsulated in British landscape painting and colonial photography have constructed the dominant lens that has shaped historical inquiries into spatial imaginings in the South Asian context. The focus on the long eighteenth century enables us to establish conversations between the intersections, connections, and comparisons that emerged in visual practices commissioned by diverse patrons from regional kings, Mughal emperors, trans-regional merchants, and British officers.

W E D N E S D A Y ,  2 1  J U N E  2 0 1 7

18.00 Evening Lecture
• Tim Barringer (Yale University), The Panorama as Global Landscape

T H U R S D A Y ,  2 2  J U N E  2 0 1 7

10.00  Welcome and Introduction from Hannah Baader (Arthistories/ Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut)  and Dipti Khera (NYU/ Arthistories Fellow 2015–16)

10.30 Morning Session
Chair: Lamia Balafrej (ArtHistories Fellow 2016–17/Wellesley College)
• Sunil Sharma (Boston University), The Pastoral Landscape in Early Modern Persian Poetry and Painting
• Chanchal Dadlani (Wake Forest University), History Without Words: Mughal Architecture in the ‘Amal-i Salih.
• Hannah Baader (Forum Transregional Studies/Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut), Seascape and Landscape, Florence 1604

14.30  Afternoon Session, Part I
Chair: Monica Juneja (Universität Heidelberg)
• Yuthika Sharma (Edinburgh College of Art), Picturing Place: Topography as Mughal Identity in Late 18th-Century Delhi
• Dipti Khera (NYU, Arthistories Fellow 2015-16), The Art of Feeling Place: Udaipur’s Affective Assertions

16.40  Afternoon Session, Part II
Chair: Ning Yao (CAHIM Fellow 2016-17)
• Nobuko Toyosawa (Oriental Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences), Mediating the Sense of Place from Tokugawa to Meiji Japan
• Lihong Liu (Rochester University), Long Day and Sleepless Night: Temporal Sensitivity in Chinese Landscape Painting

F R I D A Y ,  2 3  J U N E  2 0 1 7

9.45  Study Session in the Museum for Asian Art with Raffael Gadebusch, New ‘Perspectives’: Landscape and Architecture as Subject Matter in Late 18th-Century Indo-Islamic Painting (speakers and invited guests only)

14.00  Afternoon Session
Chair: Venugopal Madipatti (Art Histories Fellow 2016–17/Ambedkar University Delhi)
• Francesca Orsini (SOAS University of London), The Work of Description: Shifting Modes of Poetic Description of Places in 19th-Century Urdu Narratives
• Tim Barringer (Yale University), The Proleptic Picturesque of Joseph Bartholomew Kidd

Enfilade Turns Eight! Buy an Art Book! Donate to HECAA!

Posted in site information by Editor on June 21, 2017

Adriaen Manglard (French, 1695–1760), Fireworks in Rome Over Castel Sant’ Angelo, etching, plate: 23 × 31 cm (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 67.542.26).

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From the Editor

As Enfilade turns eight (22 June 2017), I’m glad to write with my usual observations and admonitions. The site exists because you—along with lots of others reading alongside you—continue to tune in. We’ve just surpassed 800,000 views. Thanks so much! And so to celebrate . . .

1) Buy an art book this week. In the world of academic art history publishing, several hundred books sold over a few days is stellar. It’s an important way to communicate that the eighteenth century is a thriving field with a vital, engaged audience. The more people who buy books addressing the eighteenth century, the easier it will be to publish your next book on the eighteenth century.

2) Renew your HECAA membership. In the normal world $30 doesn’t really count as philanthropy. For a small academic society it does. Because HECAA is registered as a 501c3, all donations are tax deductible in the United States. So send in a contribution of $100 or $5. But donate something. We accept PayPal.

3) Finally, send in news you’d like to see reported!  I’m glad to post announcements about conferences, forthcoming books, journal articles, exhibitions, fellowship opportunities, &c. Just about anything except job listings. The postings readers most enjoy are inevitably original content, reports of interesting collections, house museums, resources, and the like. No reason to be shy.

Again, thanks to all of you and all the best!
Craig Hanson

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Exhibition | Paintings of the Abbés Desjardins

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions by Editor on June 21, 2017

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Press release for the exhibition now on view at the MNBAQ:

The Fabulous Destiny of the Paintings of the Abbés Desjardins / Le Fabuleux Destin des Tableaux des Abbés Desjardins
Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec, 15 June — 4 September 2017
Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rennes, 14 October 2017 — 28 January 2018

Curated by Daniel Drouin and Guillaume Kazerouni

This exhibition highlights the bicentennial of the arrival in Canada of some 200 paintings initially done by renowned artists for churches in Paris in the 17th and 18th centuries. These paintings, confiscated during the French Revolution and reunited by clergyman Philippe-Jean-Louis Desjardins (1753–1833) , were shipped to Québec City to be sold to the rapidly growing parishes and religious congregations at the time. Fairly unfamiliar in France, this important body of religious paintings was researched recently. The history of the paintings is marked by two major periods—their use in France and their 19th-century use and impact in the Province of Québec. First, thanks to recent discoveries in France resulting in new attributions, more is known about the background for their creation. Several big names in French painting were involved—artists such as Claude Vignon, Simon and Aubin Vouet, Frère Luc, Charles-Michel-Ange Challes, Jean-Baptiste Corneille, Daniel Hallé, Pierre Puget, Michel Dorigny, Louis Boulogne le jeune, Joseph Christophe, Pierre Dulin, Samuel Massé, Jean-Jacques Lagrenée, François-Guillaume Ménageot, and Matthias Stomer—several of whom were French Court painters.

Philippe-Jean-Louis Desjardins, through his brother Louis-Joseph (1766–1848), chaplain to the Augustines de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, was very aware of the situation of Québec churches. The clergy and religious communities were booming and did not have sufficient art of devotional calibre. In 1817 and 1820, nearly 200 paintings made the voyage to Quebec. They would go on to be reframed and sold on site before being placed in various churches and chapels. Alongside this, a new cohort of Canadian artists such as Jean-Baptiste Roy-Audy, Joseph Légaré, Antoine Plamondon and Théophile Hamel would get their training by restoring French works and copying them at the request of sponsors, thereby making up for the shortage of painters in the British colony. This period saw the birth of Canadian painting, but also the creation of the first art collections in Québec and the appearance of the first museum.

A selection of some 40 French paintings and 20-or-so Québec copies of French masterpieces that have disappeared, as well as of genuine Québec work, are on display in the Pierre Lassonde Pavilion using contemporary staging. Only the French paintings from the Québec exhibition will cross the ocean again in the fall of 2017, bound for the Musée des beaux-arts de Rennes, the MNBAQ’s partner in this great museological adventure.

Once Upon a Time… Philippe-Jean-Louis et Louis-Joseph Desjardins

Philippe-Jean-Louis and Louis-Joseph Desjardins were born in Messas, France. They both studied theology at the Seminary of Orléans, and then in Paris and Bayeux. The former was ordained in 1777 and the second in 1790. During the Revolution, the two brothers, faithful to their values, fled France to England. The elder arrived in Québec City in 1793—followed by his younger sibling the following year—and held various positions, including vicar general, Séminaire professor, and chaplain of the Augustines de l’Hôtel-Dieu and of the Ursulines. The youngest was initially a missionary in Baie-des-Chaleurs before becoming vicar, then pastor, of Notre-Dame de Québec, the chaplain of the Augustines and the Superior of the Ursulines.

Philippe returned to France in 1802. His interest in the Diocese of Québec and his experience made it clear to him that painters able to meet local demand were few and far between. On returning home, he also realized that the family business was in dire financial straits. It dawned on him that there was simple solution: combine both interests by selling paintings in Lower Canada and using the profits to help his family.

Between 1803 and 1810, he acquired paintings in circumstances that remain largely unknown. The first shipment was in 1816. Four rolls and a case totaling 120 paintings left the port of Brest bound for New York City. On site, the imports had to be cleared and transportation to Québec City arranged. In the winter of 1817, the works of art made the voyage to Québec City in a sleigh. Once there, the works were delivered to Louis-Joseph in the outer chapel of the Augustines, which was transformed into a workshop where several young artists remounted the pieces and restored them before the art was sold to various parishes and communities. The same scenario was repeated in 1820, but this time with some sixty paintings.

The 17th-Century Desjardins Paintings

Most of the Desjardins paintings are 17th-century French works and, with a few exceptions, work from Italian and Northern schools. The composition of this ensemble speaks volumes about the taste of the French at the time of the Revolution. It reflects the conservation choices made in separating the works that would be placed in the newly created museums from those destined to be sold and saved by amateurs like Philippe Desjardins. As a result, the generation of painters of the 1640s, appreciated for their classicism by the curators who formed the nucleus of French national collections, such as Jacques Stella, Laurent de La Hyre, Eustache Le Sueur, Philippe de Champaigne, Sébastien Bourdon and obviously, their model, Nicolas Poussin, is either totally absent or is represented by work incorrectly attributed even before it arrived in Québec City. Only a few paintings by Philippe de Champaigne and his studio are the exception to the rule.

The strength of the Desjardins paintings lies in the art from the opposite ends of the century. Christ in the Garden of Olives, a rare canvas by Quentin Varin, introduces a remarkable ensemble from the 1630s, with two paintings by Simon Vouet and several works by his pupils and followers such as Michel Dorigny and Jean Senelle. For the second half of the century—basically the years 1680 to 1690—there are some interesting anonymous paintings such as Angels and Shepherds Adoring the Child Jesus, but especially the great paintings by Daniel Hallé, Brother Luc, Jean-Baptiste Corneille and Louis de Boullogne, including The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple, one of the masterpieces of the exhibition.

Master Simon Vouet and His Entourage

Around 1630, a new generation of artists who had trained in Italy came back to France. The most notable return was that of Simon Vouet, in 1627. After a brilliant career primarily in Rome, the painter was recalled to Paris by Louis XIII. At that time, Philippe de Champaigne and Claude Vignon—whose works are exhibited in this gallery—were beginning their careers and the biggest workshop in the city was that of Georges Lallemant, which was soon surpassed by Vouet’s. Alongside private assignments, in which Vouet excelled, the artist received commissions for religious art throughout his career.

The Desjardins paintings feature a particularly important set of works by Vouet and his entourage. This is undeniably one of the strong points of the ensemble and of this exhibition. The master himself is represented by two canvases. Saint Francis of Paola Resuscitating a Child is one of the last commissions by Vouet before his death, while The Apparition of the Virgin and Child Jesus to Saint Anthony, revealed here after its de-restoration, is situated at the very beginning of the painter’s Parisian career, just after he returned from Italy. Around these two altarpieces are paintings in which Vouet’s influence and the propagation of his artistic manner are palpable.

Jean-Jacques Lagrenée, The Entombment, 1770, oil on canvas, 155 × 205 cm
(Québec City, MNBAQ, 1970.115; photo: Patrick Altman)

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The 18th-Century Desjardins Paintings

The Desjardins paintings consist of fewer 18th-century works—mainly French—than 17th-century ones. However, chronologically, they cover the entire century. It comprises a body of work done for the churches of Paris by the most important artists of the time. At first there were originals or copies by all the big names (Collin de Vermont, Restout, Cazes, Massé or Vanloo), but several have disappeared since. The absence of a Boucher or a Fragonard is not surprising, since religious commissions occupied only a very minor place in their respective work.

The second half of the century, which marks a renewal of history painting and a gradual return to the antique model, is illustrated through Challe’s paintings for the Louvre Oratory, Lagrenée’s two masterpieces from the Abbey of Montmartre, and the large painting by Menageot. This work by well-known painters is complemented by paintings by less famous artists such as Godefroy and Preudhomme (Ursulines de Québec chapel). As a result, the paintings from the 18th century provide a far more exhaustive portrait of their era than their 17th-century counterparts. It must be borne in mind that the paintings of the Enlightenment were still very recent at the time when the Revolution broke out and did not always enjoy the same prestige as the works of the Grand Siècle.

Jean-Jacques Lagrenée, The Incredulity of St Thomas, 1770, oil on canvas, 156 × 206 cm
(Québec City, MNBAQ, 1970.114; photo: Patrick Altman)

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The Desjardins Paintings, Joseph Légaré and Art Museums in Québec

Starting in the early 1820s, self-taught Québec painter Joseph Légaré purchased several canvases from among the Desjardins paintings, some of which were the inspiration for his numerous copies. His collection would pave the way for the creation of the first two art museums in Québec in the 19th century.

As early as 1829, Légaré exhibited his collection in the meeting room of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec. In 1833, he moved it to his three-storey residence on Sainte-Angèle Street. In association with lawyer Thomas Amiot, he inaugurated the Québec Gallery of Paintings in 1838. However, Légaré’s ventures did not seem to spark much interest, and the gallery folded in 1840. Undaunted, in 1852 the painter opened the Quebec Gallery in his new home at the corner of Sainte-Ursule and McMahon Streets. Légaré died in 1855, but his widow kept the museum open until her death in 1874. Monseigneur Thomas-Étienne Hamel, Superior of the Séminaire de Québec and Rector of Laval University, bought the collection.

This acquisition laid the foundation for the Pinacotheque at Laval University as North America entered a period of museum-mania. Even before the inauguration of the first building of the Art Association of Montreal (the future Montréal Museum of Fine Arts) in 1879, the City of Québec had an art museum, thanks to Joseph Légaré’s determination. The Desjardins paintings imported some 60 years earlier formed the core of the museum’s collection.

The Augustines and Ursulines de Québec Paintings

As we have seen, the Abbés Desjardins had special ties with the Augustines de l’Hôtel-Dieu and the Ursulines de Québec, ties that went well beyond the paintings themselves. From the outset, the former were an integral part of the adventure by lending their buildings for the reception, uncrating and remounting of the paintings and by extending their hospitality to the painters involved and customers from everywhere in Québec. François-Guillaume Ménageot’s The Virgin Placing Saint Teresa under the Protection of Saint Joseph, usually found on the left lateral altarpiece of the exterior chapel of the Augustines, attests to this significant episode in the life of the paintings.

Several generations of Ursulines have venerated Christ Exposing his Sacred Heart to Margaret Mary Alacoque, by Pierre-Jacques Cazes, usually strategically placed in the exterior chapel, a place of worship which is the permanent home of the greatest number of Desjardins paintings. Seven paintings are displayed there, including Brother André’s The Meal at the House of Simon, the biggest of all the Desjardins paintings, at 3.66 metres high by 6.10 metres wide.

Copying and Distribution of the Desjardins Paintings

The Desjardins paintings played a crucial role in the growth of painting in Lower Canada by stimulating the budding careers of artists who, after having done copies of certain works, diversified their output. Since at the time there were no fine arts academies or schools in Lower Canada, these painters were able to learn the basics by borrowing to various degrees from the French academic tradition made available through this pool of 17th- and 18th-century paintings.

The inventory of the copies—a little over 120 done in the 19th century—shows that one quarter of the Desjardins paintings were used as templates by Québec artists. The most of the copies were in the chapel of the Séminaire de Québec, at the Cathedral-Basilica of Notre-Dame-de-Québec and in Joseph Légaré’s collection. The copies found their way to nearly 70 parishes or collectors, the result being considerable visibility for these paintings in our churches.

Laurier Lacroix, Guillaume Kazerouni, and Daniel Drouin, Le Fabuleux Destin des Tableaux des Abbés Desjardins: Peintures des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles des musées et églises du Québec (Gent: Snoeck Publishers, 2017), 312 pages, ISBN: 978 94616 14162, 39€.

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Call for Papers | The Tableau Vivant

Posted in Uncategorized by Editor on June 21, 2017

The Tableau Vivant: Across Media, History, and Culture
Columbia University, New York, 30 November – 2 December 2017

Proposals due by 30 July 2017

Film and Media Studies, Columbia University’s School of the Arts invites proposals for a two-day conference on The Tableau Vivant: Across Media, History, and Culture, to be held in New York from 30 November to 2 December 2017. The conference will be opened with a keynote presentation by Brigitte Peucker, Elias W. Leavenworth Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Professor of Film Studies at Yale University.

The Tableau Vivant conference hopes to bring together research that cuts across media, histories, and cultures, just like the form itself. The phenomenon of the tableau vivant is anchored in Ancient Greek mythology and mime traditions and came into being as a liturgical and ceremonial event in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, first flourishing in the late medieval and early Renaissance period before seeing a resurgence in nineteenth-century performance culture after Emma, Lady Hamilton’s famous parlor attitudes inspired a notable passage in Goethe’s 1808 Wahlverwandtschaften [Elective Affinities].

Tableaux vivants were synonymous with living paintings, statues vivants, living pictures, living statues, Grecian statues, poses plastiques, attitudes, and lebende bilder, to name but a few. While these terms could indicate that an actor, or ensemble of actors, would be holding a pose for a prolonged time in imitation of a famous painting, sculpture, or religious scene, just as often the references were omitted and the static poses and procession of scenes in themselves were the attraction; actors could be entirely nude, whitewashed, marbled, bronzed, veiled, or costumed. In its diverse forms, tableaux vivants were a part of mythology, with statues coming to life as an intermediary for gods to talk to men; they became a part of religious liturgy, such as the Passion Play; were staged at official ceremonies, such as a king’s entry into the city; functioned as anonymous political expression, in the talking statues of Rome, for instance; and were transformed by mechanical media such as photography—from Henry Peach Robinson to Jeff Wall—and film—from Georges Méliès to Ray Harryhausen and Peter Greenaway.

The Tableau Vivant conference invites proposals on the form:
• From Ancient Greece to today
• In different cultures and cultural contexts
• On its terminology and conceptual application in cultural theory
• In religion and religious ceremonies
• In society—e.g. as part of political expression or official entertainment
• In literature—e.g. in the work of Greek and Roman poets, Italian Renaissance authors, or Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
• In performance – parlor entertainment, vaudeville, burlesque, musical theatre, legitimate theatre, contemporary performance art, etc.
• In photography—e.g. in the work of the Pictorialists or Jeff Wall
• In film and (new) media, from the 19th century to today

Please submit an abstract (300–500 words) with 5 key sources and a 150-word bio via email to Vito Adriaensens, Visiting Scholar and Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University and Researcher at the Research Centre for Visual Poetics at the University of Antwerp (va2329@columbia.edu) by July 30, 2017.

Call for Papers | Entangled Urbanisms

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on June 21, 2017

From H-ArtHist:

Entangled Urbanisms: History, Place, and the Shaping of Cities
Northwestern University, Evanston, 17–18 May 2018

Proposals due by 18 September 2017

The Department of Art History at Northwestern University will hold a symposium on Thursday and Friday, May 17–18, 2018, on the topic of entangled urbanisms. The scholarly gathering seeks to examine methodological challenges and opportunities presented by the study of the interconnectedness of cities via comparative analyses and approaches. We are especially interested in research that links places in a global perspective, and we will lean toward studies of particular cases rather than papers that are historiographical in nature. Papers can touch upon all historical periods, though special consideration will be given to topics on the built environment since the year 1400. The symposium takes as its inspiration the innovative research on Paris and Chicago by David Van Zanten, who will provide a response to the symposium at its end.

Symposium speakers who do not reside locally will receive round-trip, economy airfare to Chicago/Evanston, two night’s accommodation in Evanston (three nights for international travelers), an honorarium of $500, and a travel stipend intended to cover ground transportation and some meals not provided during the symposium. Local speakers will receive the honorarium and symposium meals. Please email proposals to Jesús Escobar (j-escobar@northwestern.edu) by September 18, 2017. Include in your proposal: name and affiliation, paper title, 200-word abstract, and a brief CV, all in a single PDF file. Applications will be reviewed by the symposium organizers—Jesús Escobar, Jun Hu, and Ayala Levin—and speakers will be notified of their acceptance by October 11.

Major Donations from the Colección Cisneros

Posted in museums by Editor on June 20, 2017

Press release from the Cisneros Collection:

Juan Pedro López (1724–1787), Venezuela, Our Lady of Guidance, ca. 1762; oil on wood, 100.3 × 69.2 cm (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Jorge Rivas).

The Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros announced the donation of 119 pieces from its collection of colonial art, one of the five collections that comprise the CPPC, to five leading institutions committed to the conservation and study of the legacies of art from the colonial and early republican periods in Latin America: the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, Texas; Denver Art Museum, Colorado; Hispanic Society Museum & Library, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Massachusetts; and the Museo de Arte de Lima (MALI), Peru.

The colonial art collection of the CPPC was formed with the intention to create a broad representation of Venezuelan art from the middle of the seventeenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. This core is complemented by select works from the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, as well as pieces from elsewhere in the Spanish Caribbean.

This 119-piece donation from the Coleccion Patricia Phelps de Cisneros to these five museums will expand their geographic and temporal horizons, with the primary objective of encouraging a broader, more diverse and inclusive view of Latin American artistic production from the 17th to mid-19th centuries.

In choosing these five institutions, the CPPC has carefully considered their individual profile and research focus. For the Blanton Museum of Art of the University of Texas, Austin, the donation will contribute to the founding nucleus of a collection of colonial and republican art, and will be an important complement to the museum’s remarkable and growing collection of modern and contemporary art that has made the Blanton a reference for scholarship in the field.

For the Denver Art Museum, the custodian of the largest and most extensive collection of colonial art in the United States, the donation will add depth to its holdings from Venezuela and the Caribbean, until now among the least represented regions in its collection. This donation also celebrates nearly half a century of the Denver Art Museum’s commitment to the study and dissemination of and education about Latin American colonial art.

In the case of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the gift represents the fruitful culmination of an institutional relationship that began in 2010. With this gift, the CPPC will formally transfer to the MFA a group of furniture, silver and paintings that had been on long-term loan and which originally served to complete the museum’s colonial art collections on the occasion of the opening of the widely-admired Art of the Americas wing. The gift includes some additional works that enrich the initial group and extol the museum’s continued effort and commitment to research and education about Latin American colonial art, and place this production in active dialogue with North American colonial art.

The Hispanic Society Museum & Library in New York, one of the institutions to pioneer the collection and study of Latin American colonial art, will receive a very important piece of furniture: the golden armchair for the brotherhood of San Pedro of the Cathedral of Caracas. Made around 1755 by the cabinetmaker Antonio Mateo de los Reyes, this imposing armchair, the first Venezuelan colonial masterpiece to enter this important collection, was used to seat the life-size sculpture of the patron saint of the brotherhood.

A special donation is being made to the Museo de Arte de Lima (MALI), a museum considered a model among Latin American cultural institutions. With the donation of an important portrait by the republican painter Jose Gil de Castro, the CPPC wishes not only to add this work to the collection, but to also recognize the pioneering work being carried out by its patrons and staff.

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Symposium | Movement and Circulation in North American Art

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on June 19, 2017

From H-ArtHist and the Freie Universität Berlin:

At Home and Abroad: Movement, Influence, and Circulation in North American Art
John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, 28–29 June 2017

This international symposium will explore transcultural exchanges of North American artists and art objects from the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth century. Papers will address the movement and displacement of North American artists and the circulation of physical art objects in North America and Europe, such as paintings and prints, during a broad time frame. Issues of audience and viewership across North America and Europe will also be considered, along with the varied forms of influence and knowledge from sources such as newspapers, letters, and copies of graphic material.

Seeking to stimulate an interdisciplinary exchange, this symposium brings together invited scholars and curators working in universities and museums in the United States, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

The symposium is organized by Dr. Allison Stagg, Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin.

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W E D N E S D A Y ,  2 8  J U N E  2 0 1 7

18:15  Allison Stagg (John F. Kennedy Institute for North America Studies), Transatlantic Visual Humor and the Political Caricature Portrait

T H U R S D A Y ,  2 9  J U N E  2 0 1 7

13:30  Welcome and Introduction from Winfried Fluck (Professor, Department of Culture, John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies) and Allison Stagg (Terra Visiting Professor of America Art, John F. Kennedy Institute)

14:00  Nancy Siegel (Professor, Art History, Towson University, Maryland), The Bitter Draught and a Bloody Massacre: Political Satire by Paul Revere

14:45  Martin Myrone (Curator, Tate Britain, London), The American School in London: Privilege and Preference at the Royal Academy Schools, 1769–1830

15:30  Coffee break

16:00  Dominic Hardy (Professor, Art History, Université du Québec à Montréal), Cross-readings: Colonial Canadian Identities and Transatlantic Graphic Satire in the 1840s

16:45  Larne Abse Gogarty (Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, Humboldt Universität, Berlin), Entertainment for Moralists: The Politics of Figuration in 1950s Chicago

17:30  Closing remarks

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Post-doctoral Fellowships from the Volkswagen Foundation

Posted in fellowships by Editor on June 19, 2017

From the Volkswagon Foundation:

Post-doctoral Fellowships in the Humanities in the U.S. and Germany
Applications due by 12 September 2017

Through its funding initiative “Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Humanities at Universities and Research Institutes in Germany and the USA” the Volkswagen Foundation aims to strengthen transatlantic academic relations, especially in the field of the Humanities. In this funding initiative, the Volkswagen Foundation works closely with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York.

In the context of this initiative, the two foundations cooperate with several universities and research institutes of excellence in Germany, in the USA, and Canada. In general, however, applicants are able to apply to a host university or research institute of their choice.

• Call: Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Humanities at Universities and Research Institutions in Germany. Application deadline is September 12, 2017. The Fellowships address postdocs based at American universities and research institutes working in the Humanities who wish to spend some time in Germany working on a research project. Details of conditions and the application procedure can be found under Information for Applicants 97 (pdf). Applications must be filed electronically via the electronic application system.

• Call: Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Humanities at Universities and Research Institutes in the U.S. and Canada. Application deadline is September 5, 2017. The Fellowships address postdocs based at German universities and research institutes who wish to spend some time in the USA or in Canada working on their research project, or to concentrate on a particular aspect of their postdoctoral dissertation. Details of conditions and the application procedure can be found under Information for Applicants 96 (pdf). Applications must be filed electronically via the electronic application system.

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The Lichtenberg-Kolleg in Göttingen is one of the cooperating partners. The Fellowships address postdocs at American universities and research institutes working in the Humanities who wish to spend some time at the Lichtenberg-Kolleg working on a research project. The institute invites early career scholars to join one of our research groups focusing on either 1) Göttingen and European Enlightenment(s) within its wider Atlantic and Global Contexts, 2) Human Rights, Constitutional Politics and Religious Diversity, 3) Modern Jewish Studies: literary, intellectual and cultural history, or 4) European Intellectual History / History of Political Thought. The composition of each research group will be a mixture of Senior Fellows, Mid-Career Fellows, Early Career Fellowships (ECF), Göttingen Faculty, and Ph.D. students. ECFs offer early career scholars opportunities to take their research to more advanced levels set up new projects and prepare themselves for their professional future as academic teachers, researchers, and administrators.

Call for Papers | Printing Colour, 1700–1830

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on June 18, 2017

Jacob Christoph Le Blon, after Hyacinthe Rigaud, Cardinal André-Hercule de Fleury, 1738, mezzotint with colour separatons.

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From the Institute of English Studies at the University of London:

Printing Colour, 1700–1830: Discoveries, Rediscoveries, and Innovations
Senate House, London, 10–12 April 2018

Proposals due by 1 October 2017

Eighteenth-century book and print cultures are considered to be black and white (with a little red). Colour-printed material, like William Blake’s visionary books and French decorative art, is considered rare and exceptional. However, recent discoveries in archives, libraries and museums are revealing that bright inks were not extraordinary. Artistic and commercial possibilities were transformed between rapid technical advances around 1700 (when Johannes Teyler and Jacob Christoff Le Blon invented new colour printing techniques) and 1830 (when the Industrial Revolution mechanised printing and chromolithography was patented). These innovations added commercial value and didactic meaning to material including advertising, books, brocade paper, cartography, decorative art, fashion, fine art, illustrations, medicine, trade cards, scientific imagery, texts, textiles and wallpaper.

The saturation of some markets with colour may have contributed to the conclusion that only black-and-white was suitable for fine books and artistic prints. As a result, this printed colour has been traditionally recorded only for well-known ‘rarities’. The rest remains largely invisible to scholarship. Thus, some producers are known as elite ‘artists’ in one field but prolific ‘mere illustrators’ in another, and antecedents of celebrated ‘experiments’ and ‘inventions’ are rarely acknowledged. When these artworks, books, domestic objects and ephemera are considered together, alongside the materials and techniques that enabled their production, the implications overturn assumptions from the historical humanities to conservation science. A new, interdisciplinary approach is now required.

Following from Printing Colour 1400–1700, this conference will be the first interdisciplinary assessment of Western color printmaking in the long eighteenth century, 1700–1830. It is intended to lead to the publication of the first handbook colour printmaking in the late hand-press period, creating a new, interdisciplinary paradigm for the history of printed material.

Abstracts for papers or posters are encouraged from historians of all kinds of printed materials (including historians of art, books, botany, design, fashion, meteorology, music and science), conservators, curators, rare book librarians, practising printers and printmakers, and historians of collecting. Transport and accommodation offered to speakers. Please submit abstracts for papers (20 minutes) and posters (A1 portrait/vertical) by 1 October 2017.

Keynote: Margaret Graselli (National Gallery of Art, D.C.)
Convenors: Elizabeth Savage (Institute of English Studies) and Ad Stijnman (Leiden University)

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