Enfilade

New Book | The Life and Work of Rosalba Carriera

Posted in books by Editor on July 6, 2020

Soon available from AUP:

Angela Oberer, The Life and Work of Rosalba Carriera (1673–1757): The Queen of Pastel (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2020), 332 pages, ISBN: 9789462988996, €119 / $140.

The Life and Work of Rosalba Carriera (1673–1757): The Queen of Pastel is the first extensive biographical narrative in English of Rosalba Carriera. It is also the first scholarly investigation into the external and internal factors that helped to create this female painter’s unique career in eighteenth-century Europe. It documents the difficulties, complications, and consequences that arose then—and can also arise today—when a woman decides to become an independent artist. This book contributes a new, in-depth analysis of the interplay among society’s expectations, generally accepted codices for gendered behavior, and one single female painter’s astute strategies for achieving success, as well as autonomy in her professional life as a famed artist. Some of the questions that the author raises are: How did Carriera manage to build up her career? How did she run her business and organize her own workshop? What kind of artist was Carriera? Finally, what do her self-portraits reveal in terms of self-enactment, possibly autobiographical turning points?

Angela Oberer graduated from Bonn University with a master’s thesis on “The Cycle of the True Cross Relic at the Scuola Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista in Venice.” In 2002 she received her doctoral degree at the Technische Universität in Berlin with a thesis on Signorelli’s and Sodoma’s fresco cycle in Monte Oliveto Maggiore. Since 2003 she had taught art history at various U.S. study abroad programs in Florence—currently at Georgetown University, Florence, at AIFS, at CET (which is associated with Vanderbilt University), and at other programs that work with colleges and universities from across the United States.

Online Lecture | Diana Davis on Furniture for the Anglo-Gallic Interior

Posted in books, lectures (to attend) by Editor on June 23, 2020

The Green Drawing Room of the Earl of Essex at Cassiobury, by William Henry Hunt, 1823
(New York: Cooper Hewitt Museum, Thaw Collection, 2007-27-4)

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From the FHS announcement:

Diana Davis, Raiding the Past: Furniture for the Anglo-Gallic Interior, 1800–1865
Furniture History Society Online Lecture, Sunday, 28 June 2020, 19.00 (BST)

In December 1836, the dealer George Gunn advertised his “BUHL and MARQUETERIE FURNITURE, clocks, bronzes, carved salons, consoles, ancient chimnies, tapestry, and every description of property connected with the time and taste of Louis XIV.” It reflected a radical change in collecting practice, an opulent Anglo-Gallic decorative style that combined the contrasting taste of two rival nations. This talk by Dr Diana Davis investigates the role of dealer cabinetmakers such as Edward Holmes Baldock and Robert Hume, who transformed ancien régime furniture into cherished heirlooms for a new century and then created their own new and modified furniture inspired by it. By examining this furniture from the patron’s perspective and in the context of the interiors for which it was made, the dealer emerges centre stage as trader, maker, and tastemaker. The lecture is to accompany the publication of Dr Davis’s exciting new book, The Tastemakers: British Dealers and the Anglo Gallic Interior, 1785–1865, and we will be disclosing some discount codes, for 20% off the RRP, on the evening.

Diana Davis specializes in the interface between collectors, dealers, and the art market in the nineteenth century. She co-edits the French Porcelain Society Journal and has lectured for Christie’s Education, the Furniture History Society, the French Porcelain Society, the Wallace Collection, the National Trust, at the Jewish Country House Conference, and at Masterpiece.

Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/92489818630?pwd=SWlGdE5EZ0pnb3AzLzJ2TndlamY1dz09
Meeting ID: 924 8981 8630 Password: 119856
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/adR8w0b1xy

Attendees will be admitted from the waiting room from 18.45. Please make sure that you are muted and that your camera is turned off. For security reasons we will lock the meeting at 19.20, so please make sure you have joined by then. The lecture will be followed by a round of Q&A; please use the chat message box at the bottom of your Zoom window. Zoom has increased its security and you may be required to install an update. The FHS has decided to invite the members of other like-minded societies around the world. If you are not yet a member but would like to join the society, please see our website.

Print Quarterly, June 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 20, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.2 (June 2020)

Rembrandt van Rijn, Portrait of Jan Six, 1647, etching, engraving, and drypoint, 244 × 191mm (Amsterdam: Rijksprentenkabinett).

A R T I C L E S

Antoinette Friedenthal, “Sketched, Not Etched: Jan Six and the Mariettes’ Rembrandt Oeuvre for Prince Eugene of Savoy,” pp. 140–51.

This article considers the compilation of the Rembrandt album originally produced for Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663–1736). Particular emphasis is placed on the attempts to procure a rare impression of Rembrandt’s Portrait of Jan Six. Reference to the correspondence of Jean Mariette (1660–1742) and Pierre Jean Mariette (1694–1774) on the matter and their draft catalogue reveals that the Prince’s etched Portrait of Jan Six is, in fact, a drawn copy after the print. This in turn serves to support the proposal that the Prince of Savoy’s Rembrandt album is not held in Dresden as previously thought, but instead in the Albertina in Vienna.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Helmut Gier, Review of New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Ulrich Kraus, Parts I–V, (2018–19), pp. 180–83.

The note provides an overview of the five New Hollstein volumes that bring together the corpus of Johann Ulrich Kraus (1655–1719). A prodigious printmaker and publisher, Kraus’s diverse output included commissions for various European courts, book illustrations, architectural treatises, and portraits. He is notable for sensitivity to, and amalgamation of, the latest French, Italian, Dutch, and German artistic trends.

Giorgio Marini, Review of Elisabetta Rizzioli, L’Officina di Leopoldo Cicognara: La Creazione delle Immagini per la ‘Storia della Scultura’ (2016), pp. 184–87.

Rizzioli’s book focuses on the art theorist and critic Francesco Leopoldo Cicognara (1767–1834), who “played a crucial role in the promotion of the arts from the Neoclassical period to the 1814–15 Congress of Vienna, relying on an international artistic community to which Antonio Canova (1757–1822) had introduced him.”

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Antonia Dosen, Dubravka Botica, Anamarija Stepanić, Andelika Galić, and Petra Milovac, eds., Architecture and Performance: Prints from the Cabinet of Louis XIV in the MUO Holdings, exhibition catalogue (Zagreb: Museum of Arts and Crafts, 2016), p. 204.

“With parallel Croatian and English texts, the well-illustrated Architecture and Performance is dedicated to three groups of prints that were part of the so-called Cabinet du Roi . . . the three volumes dedicated to the Louvre, the Tuileries, Versailles and the royal festivals.”

Award Winning Exhibition | Spaces of Wonder, Wonder of Spaces

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions by Editor on June 18, 2020

Recently announced by the Association of College and Research Libraries, with a full list of winners here. Congratulations, Christina Smylitopoulos! More information on the Bachinski / Chu Print Study Collection is available here.

The exhibition catalogue Spaces of Wonder, Wonder of Space: Encountering the Eighteenth Century in Image, Object, and Text, edited by Christina Smylitopoulos, has been selected as a winner of the Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab Exhibition Award (Division Three) by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS). This collaborative, multi-venue show was developed in conjunction with the 2018 Société canadienne d’étude du dix-huitième siècle / Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference held in Niagara Falls, Ontario, which was organized jointly by Mount Allison University (MAU; Sackville, New Brunswick) and the University of Guelph (Guelph, Ontario).

The show, which featured works from the Bachinski / Chu Print Study Collection and objects from the McLaughlin Library’s Archival & Special Collections and the Barker Museum of Veterinary History (October 2018 – April 2019) was funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada project Wonder in the Eighteenth Century (Christina Ionescu / Christina Smylitopoulos) and reflects the work of undergraduate students pursuing experiential learning opportunities, graduate students in Art/History, and faculty and curatorial colleagues from Mount Allison University the UofG’s College of Arts.

“The content and conceit of this publication is commendable. The central thesis concatenating the objects was compelling and original, offering a discussion not just of objects but also how they are perceived. The committee appreciated the collaborative approach to this topic, which gave space to a wide range of voices and approaches from students to faculty.” –Leab Awards Committee

New Book | The English Folly: The Edifice Complex

Posted in books by Editor on June 16, 2020

From Historic England and Liverpool UP:

Gwyn Headley and Wim Meulenkamp, The English Folly: The Edifice Complex (Historic England, 2020), 260 pages, ISBN: 978-1789621976 (hardcover), £60 / ISBN: 978-1789622126 (paperback), £30.

If this were a novel, the tales of astounding wealth, sexual perversion, murder, munificence, rape, insanity, brutality, slavery, religious mania, selfishness, snobbery, charity, suicide, generosity, theft, madness, wickedness, failure, and eccentricity which unfold in these pages would be too concentrated to allow for the willing suspension of disbelief. All these sins and virtues, and more, are displayed by the characters in this book, some exhibiting several of them simultaneously. Folly builders were not as we are. They never built what we now call follies. They built for beauty, utility, improvement; it is only we, struggling after them with our imperfect understanding, who dismiss their prodigious constructions as follies. Follies can be found around the world, but England is their spiritual home. Having written the definitive books on follies in Great Britain, Benelux, and the USA, Headley and Meulenkamp have turned their attention to the folly builders themselves, people so blinded by fashion or driven by some nameless ideology that they expended great fortunes on making their point in brick, stone and flint. Most follies are simply misunderstood buildings, and this book studies the motives, characters, decisions and delusions of their builders. If there was madness in their building, fortunately there was no method in it.

Gwyn Headley is Publisher at Heritage Ebooks, Managing Director at fotoLibra and Co-founder of The Folly Fellowship. Wim Meulenkamp is President of The DonderbergGroup: Foundation for Follies, Garden Ornaments and the Architecture of Amusement.

New Book | Making the Modern Artist

Posted in books by Editor on June 10, 2020

Forthcoming this fall from the Paul Mellon Centre and Yale UP:

Martin Myrone, Making the Modern Artist: Culture, Class, and Art-Educational Opportunity in Romantic Britain (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2020), 288 pages, ISBN: 978-1913107154, £45 / $60.

The artist has been a privileged figure in the modern age, embodying ideals of personal and political freedom and self-fulfillment. Does it matter who gets to be an artist? And do our deeply held beliefs stand up to scrutiny? Making the Modern Artist gets to the root of these questions by exploring the historical genesis of the figure of the artist. Based on an unprecedented biographical survey of almost 1,800 students at the Royal Academy of Arts in London between 1769 and 1830, the book reveals hidden stories about family origins, personal networks, and patterns of opportunity and social mobility. Locating the emergence of the ‘modern artist’ in the crucible of Romantic Britain, rather than in 19th-century Paris or 20th-century New York, it reconnects the story of art with the advance of capitalism and demonstrates surprising continuities between liberal individualism and state formation, our dreams of personal freedom, and the social suffering characteristic of the modern era.

Martin Myrone is senior curator of pre-1800 British art at Tate Britain, London.

New Book | Ugliness and Judgment: On Architecture in the Public Eye

Posted in books by Editor on June 8, 2020

From Princeton UP:

Timothy Hyde, Ugliness and Judgment: On Architecture in the Public Eye (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019), 232 pages, ISBN: 978-0691179162, $35 / £30.

When buildings are deemed ugly, what are the consequences? In Ugliness and Judgment, Timothy Hyde considers the role of aesthetic judgment—and its concern for ugliness—in architectural debates and their resulting social effects across three centuries of British architectural history. From eighteenth-century ideas about Stonehenge to Prince Charles’s opinions about the National Gallery, Hyde uncovers a new story of aesthetic judgment, where arguments about architectural ugliness do not pertain solely to buildings or assessments of style, but intrude into other spheres of civil society.

Hyde explores how accidental and willful conditions of ugliness—including the gothic revival Houses of Parliament, the brutalist concrete of the South Bank, and the historicist novelty of Number One Poultry—have been debated in parliamentary committees, courtrooms, and public inquiries. He recounts how architects such as Christopher Wren, John Soane, James Stirling, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe have been summoned by tribunals of aesthetic judgment. With his novel scrutiny of lawsuits for libel, changing paradigms of nuisance law, and conventions of monarchical privilege, he shows how aesthetic judgments have become entangled in wider assessments of art, science, religion, political economy, and the state. Moving beyond superficialities of taste in order to see how architectural improprieties enable architecture to participate in social transformations, Ugliness and Judgment sheds new light on the role of aesthetic measurement in our world.

Timothy Hyde is associate professor in the history and theory of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of Constitutional Modernism: Architecture and Civil Society in Cuba, 1933–1959.

New Book | Beyond Aesthetics

Posted in books by Editor on June 3, 2020

From Yale UP:

Wole Soyinka, Beyond Aesthetics: Use, Abuse, and Dissonance in African Art Traditions (New Haven: Yale University Press in association with the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, 2020), 160 pages, ISBN: 978-0300247626, $25.

An intimate reflection on culture and tradition, creativity and power, that draws on a lifetime’s commitment to aesthetic encounter.

The playwright, poet, essayist, novelist, and Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka is also a longtime art collector. This book of essays offers a glimpse into the motivations of the collector, as well as a highly personal look at the politics of aesthetics and collecting. Detailing moments of first encounter with objects that drew him in and continue to affect him, Soyinka describes a world of mortals, muses, and deities that imbue the artworks with history and meaning.

Beyond Aesthetics is a passionate discussion of the role of identity, tradition, and originality in making, collecting, and exhibiting African art today. Soyinka considers objects that have stirred controversy, and he decries dogmatic efforts—whether colonial or religious—to suppress Africa’s artistic traditions. By turns poetic, provocative, and humorous, Soyinka affirms the power of collecting to reclaim tradition. He urges African artists, filmmakers, collectors, and curators to engage with their aesthetic and cultural histories.

Wole Soyinka is a Nigerian playwright, poet, and political activist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986. His many publications include You Must Set Forth at Dawn and Of Africa.

New Book | The Classical Body in Romantic Britain

Posted in books by Editor on May 25, 2020

Distributed by Yale UP:

Cora Gilroy-Ware, The Classical Body in Romantic Britain (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art , 2020), 320 pages, ISBN: 978-1913107062, $50.

For many, the term ‘neoclassicism’ has come to imply discipline, order, restraint, and a certain myopia. Leaving the term behind, this book radically challenges enduring assumptions about the art produced from the late 18th century to the early Victorian period, casting new light on appropriations of the classical body by British artists. It is the first to foreground the intersections of gender, race, and class in discussions of British visual classicism, laying bare artists’ alternately politicizing and emphatically sensual engagements with Greco-Roman art. Rather than rely exclusively on subsequent scholarship, the book takes up the poet John Keats (1795–1821) as a theoretical framework. Eschewing the ‘Golden Age’ narrative, which sees J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851) as the pinnacle of the period’s artistic achievement, the book examines overlooked artists, such as Henry Howard (1769–1847) and John Graham Lough (1798–1876). The result is a fresh account of underappreciated works of British painting and sculpture.

Cora Gilroy-Ware is a scholar, artist, and curator currently working with Isaac Julien CBE RA.

Exhibition | Japan: Courts and Culture

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions by Editor on May 16, 2020

Press release (12 November 2019) for the exhibition from the Royal Collection Trust (stay tuned for updates on the schedule; listed are the original dates). . .

 Japan: Courts and Culture
The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London, 12 June — 8 November 2020

Curated by Rachel Peat

Arita, Hizen Province (Japan), Jar and Cover, 1690–1720, porcelain with moulded relief decoration and painted in underglaze blue, overglaze enamel, and gold; French mounts, 1780–1820, gilt bronze; 42.5 cm high, purchased for George IV in 1820 (Royal Collection Trust, RCIN 39239).

The Royal Collection contains one of the finest holdings of Japanese works of art in the Western world, significant for both the unique provenance and exceptional quality of the objects. Now, for the first time, highlights from the collection are brought together in the exhibition Japan: Courts and Culture, which tells the story of the diplomatic, artistic, and cultural exchanges between Britain and Japan from the reigns of James I to Queen Elizabeth II. Including rare examples of porcelain, lacquer, armour and embroidered screens, the exhibition offers a unique insight into the relationship between the imperial and royal courts over a period of 300 years.

The formation of the East India Company in 1600 paved the way for direct contact between Japan and England. In 1613, the first English ship to reach Japanese shores was captained by John Saris, who brought with him letters and gifts from James I for Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu, the military leader who governed Japan on behalf of the imperial family. Saris returned with a letter granting the English permission to live and trade in Japan, and with gifts for the King. These included a samurai armour, the earliest to arrive in Britain and the first surviving non-European work of art to enter the Royal Collection.

This first contact between England and Japan was short-lived. From the 1630s, for some 220 years, Japan closed to the West in an attempt to regulate foreign influence. During this time, the Dutch were the only Europeans permitted to trade directly with Japan through one small enclave at Nagasaki. Demand for exotic East Asian wares remained high in Europe, where the secrets of porcelain and lacquer manufacture were yet to be discovered.

The British royal family led the way in collecting highly prized examples of Japanese lacquer, porcelain, and textiles—much of which was produced specifically for the export market. In the 17th century, Mary II displayed Japanese porcelain in her apartments at Kensington Palace and Hampton Court Palace. In the 18th century, Queen Caroline, consort of George II, formed a significant collection of Japanese lacquer. A century later, George IV incorporated Japanese porcelain into the opulent decorative schemes at Carlton House in London and the Royal Pavilion, Brighton. Many of the pieces acquired by the King were given new functions through the addition of elaborate gilt-bronze mounts, turning a simple jar into a pot-pourri vase and animal figures into incense burners.

When Japan reopened to the West in the 1850s, goods began to flow freely, and diplomatic and political links were re-established. Queen Victoria’s son, Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, was the first member of a European royal family to visit Japan when he arrived there in 1869 during a world naval tour. The Prince met the Emperor Meiji at the Imperial Palace, where an exchange of gifts took place, and was presented with samurai armour, including a helmet dating from 1537. In a letter to his mother, Alfred wrote: “To give you any account of this country, I feel quite at a loss. Every thing is so new & so quaint that I am quite bewildered.”

The next members of the British royal family to visit Japan were Queen Victoria’s grandsons Prince George of Wales (the future King George V) and his brother, Prince Albert Victor. In 1881, the teenage Princes were serving as midshipmen aboard HMS Bacchante and were granted shore leave to meet the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shōken. They returned with presents for their family, including a teapot and cups for their father, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, and with diplomatic gifts from the Emperor. According to the official diary of the tour, compiled by their tutor, the Reverend John Dalton, the Princes had their arms tattooed during their visit to Japan—Albert Victor with ‘a couple of storks’ and George with a dragon and a tiger, a combination said to signify East and West.

In the early 20th century, a defensive Anglo-Japanese Alliance was formed to secure both nations’ interests in the Pacific. This was also a period of growing artistic exchange. The most significant cultural event was the 1910 Japan-British Exhibition in London, which included demonstrations of Japanese crafts, music, sports, and entertainments. More than eight million people visited the exhibition, including Queen Mary, consort of King George V, who was an enthusiastic collector of East Asian art.

The relationship between the Japanese and British imperial and royal families has continued to flourish through reciprocal royal visits, attendance at coronations, and the exchange of gifts. In 1902, Prince Komatsu Akihito attended the coronation of King Edward VII on behalf of the Emperor Meiji and presented the King with an embroidered folding screen of the four seasons. In 1911, Queen Mary received a coronation gift of a miniature cabinet bearing the imperial chrysanthemum crest, created by Akatsuka Jitoku, one of the most accomplished lacquerers of his generation. On the occasion of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, the Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito) sent Her Majesty a cosmetic box decorated with a heron by the great lacquer artist Shirayama Shōsai.

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In the United States and Canada, the catalogue is distributed by The University of Chicago Press:

Rachel Peat, ed., Japan: Courts and Culture (London: Royal Collection Trust, 2020), 320 pages, ISBN: 978-1909741683, $70.

Japan: Courts and Culture tells the story of three centuries of British royal contact with Japan, from 1603 to c.1937, when the exchange of exquisite works of art was central to both diplomatic relations and cultural communication. With discussions of courtly rituals, trade relationships, treaties, and other matters of concern between the two nations, this book provides important historical and political context in addition to granting a new look at the works of art in question. Featuring new research on previously unpublished works, including porcelain, lacquer, armor, embroidery, metalwork, and works on paper, this book showcases the unparalleled craftsmanship of these objects, and the local materials, techniques, and traditions behind them. Japan: Courts and Culture is published to accompany a spectacular exhibition of the same name, which opens at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, in June 2020. The book’s stunning photography, contextual essays, and historical insights offer a highly visual record of a royal narrative and history that has not yet been widely documented.

Rachel Peat is assistant curator of non-European works of art at Royal Collection Trust.

C O N T E N T S

Foreword, HRH The Prince of Wales and Princess Akiko of Mikasa
British and Japanese Royal Family Trees
Map of Japan

1  Introduction, Rachel Peat
2  First Encounters, 1600–1639, Rachel Peat
3  Trade, 1639–1854, Rachel Peat
4  Porcelain, Melanie Wilson and Rachel Peat
5  Lacquer, Rachel Peat
6  Travel, 1854–1901, Rachel Peat
7  Samurai, Arms and Armour, Gregory Irvine
8  Metalwork, Kathryn Jones
9  Treaty, 1901–1937, Rachel Peat
10  Artistic Exchange, Kathryn Jones
11  Courtly Ritual, Caroline de Guitaut
12  Coda, Rachel Peat
13  Appendix: The Model of the Taitokuin Mausoleum, William H. Coaldrake

Glossary
Timeline of Key Events
Bibliography
Acknowledgements
Index