Enfilade

Student Funding | Research Related to Castletown House, County Kildare

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on August 16, 2021

From the application form:

Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary
Applications due by 13 November 2021

The Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary was established in 2017 in honour of the late Professor Nowlan, who chaired the Castletown Foundation for more than three decades. The scholarship, advertised biannually, aims to further research on the history, architecture, collections, and estate of Castletown House in County Kildare. Applicants must be registered students and engaged in research which focuses on or relates to Castletown. The award of €2,000 may be used for research-related expenses or University fees. The selection committee will be composed of members of the Castletown Foundation and one external specialist. The scholarship need not be awarded in any one year, and the decision of the assessors is final.

Applicants must complete this form and submit it by email to Professor Christine Casey, caseych@tcd.ie, and Dr. Alison FitzGerald, alison.fitzgerald@mu.ie, by 5pm, Friday, 13 November 2021, with the subject line ‘Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary’. A confidential reference supporting the application must arrive separately, before the closing date.

HECAA Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet

Posted in graduate students, Member News by Editor on June 27, 2021

HECAA Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet
Thursday, 1 July 2021, 5.30–6.30pm (EDT)

Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) is pleased to announce the first Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet. Come meet other HECAA emerging scholars* and chat casually about your work and about what kind of programming or resources you would like HECAA to put together to serve this constituency.

Please register here:

https://nyu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUvd-qtqD4pHdIm4F3fkrj1l869FAAuf6er

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. If you cannot join this meet-up but have ideas or concerns to share, please reach out to Daniella Berman, At-Large Board Member/Graduate Student Representative: daniella.berman@nyu.edu. Please circulate widely to colleagues and students. This meet-up is open to non-HECAA members interested in getting a sense for our community.

* There’s no cut-off for this emerging scholars’ group; please self-identify as you see fit!

2019 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Very belated congratulations! I would expect the 2020 listing to be available in June or July. CH

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2019 lists four ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Katherine Calvin, “Antiquity and Empire: The Construction of History in Western European Representations of the Ottoman Empire, 1650–1830” (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, M. Sheriff and C. Johns)

• Bart Pushaw, “The Global Invention of Art: Race and Visual Sovereignity in the Colonial Baltic, 1860–1915” (University of Maryland, College Park, S. Mansbach)

• Leslie E. Todd, “Reconciling Colonial Contradictions: The Multiple Roles of Sculpture in Eighteenth-Century Quito” (University of Florida, M. Stanfield-Mazzi)

• Hye-shim Yi, “Art, Materiality, and Intermediality: The Multimedia Writing Practice of Chen Hongshou (1768–1822)” (UCLA, H. Lee)

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and fifteen ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Jacob Leveton, “William Blake’s Radical Ecology” (Northwestern University, S. Eisenman)

• Kelsey Martin, “Graveuses en taille-douce: French Women Engravers from the Ancien Regime to the Napoleonic Empire (1660–1815)” (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, M. Hyde)

• Saylor, Miranda, “Sor María de Ágreda and Sacred Art in Eighteenth-Century Mexico” (UCLA, C. Villaseñor-Black)

2018 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2018 lists six ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Alissa Adams, “French Depictions of Napoleon I’s Resurrection, 1821–1848” (The University of Iowa, D. Johnson)

• Kelsey Brosnan, ““Seductive Surfaces: The Still Life Paintings of Anne Vallayer-Coster (1744–1818)” (Rutgers University, S. Sidlauskas)

• Monica Hahn, “Go-Between Portraits and the Imperial Imagination, circa 1800” (Temple University, E. Pauwels)

• Laurel O. Peterson, “Making Spaces: Art and Politics in the Whig Country House, 1688–1745” (Yale University, T. Barringer)

• Mei Rado, “The Empire’s New Cloth: Western Textiles and Imperial Identity at the Eighteenth-Century Qing Court” (Bard Graduate Center, F. Louis)

• Sarah Sylvester Williams, “After Watteau: Nicolas Lancret and the Creation of the Hunt Luncheon” (University of Missouri, M. Yonan)

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and forty-five ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Wenjie Su, “Machines of Time, Towers of Knowledge: Miniature Architectural Spaces and the Design of Timepieces in Sino-European Encounters, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries” (Princeton, T. DaCosta Kaufmann)

• Emily K. Thames, “Enlightenment, Reform, and Identity in Late Eighteenth-Century Puerto Rico: The Art of José Campeche (1751–1809)” (Florida State University, P. Niell)

2017 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2017 lists nine ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Kasie Alt, “Culture of Illusion: Landscape Gardens, Fabricated Ruins, and the Diorama, ca. 1750–1850” (University of Texas at Austin, M. Charlesworth)

• Emily Casey, “Waterscapes: Representing the Sea in the American Imagination, 1750–1800” (University of Delaware, W. Bellion)

• Kathryn Desplanque, “Art, Commerce, and Caricature: Satirical Images of Artistic Life in Paris, 1750–1850” (Duke University, N. McWilliam)

• Lauren Kellogg DiSalvo, “Micromosaics: Souvenirs, Collective Memory, and the Reception of Antiquity on the Grand Tour” (University of Missouri, K. Slane and M. Yonan)

• Alexandra Helprin, “The Sheremetevs and the Argunovs: Art, Serfdom, and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Russia” (Columbia University, A. Higonnet)

• Barbara M. Laux, “Claude III Audran, Modern Ornemaniste of the Rococo Style” (Graduate Center, CUNY, P. Mainardi)

• Tamar Mayer, “Consequences of Drawing: Self and History in Jacques-Louis David’s Preparatory Practices” (University of Chicago, R. Ubl, M. Ward)

• Kelly Presutti, “Terroir after the Terror: Landscape and Representation in Nineteenth-Century France” (MIT, K. Smentek)

• Michael Traver Ridlen, “Prud’hon’s Evolving Classicism” (The University of Iowa, D. Johnson)

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and thirty-one ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Lilit Sadoyan, “Meuble and Mobility: Furniture in Long-Eighteenth-Century France” (University of California, Santa Barbara, E. B. Robertson and M. Meadow)

• Luciano Vanni, “The Renovation of the Habsburg-Lorraine Residences: Eighteenth-Century Imperial and Archducal Palaces in Prague, Brussels, and Florence” (Princeton, T. DaCosta Kaufmann)

 

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on December 15, 2020

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award
Applications due by 15 February 2021

Supporting feminist topics in eighteenth-century art history and visual culture

Award Amount: $2000
Eligibility: Doctoral candidates, early career scholars, and contingent faculty who are current members of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) and the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA).
Submission Materials: A 750-word description of the proposed project, a CV, and a budget (as a PDF file or MS Word doc). Please send submissions to MarySheriffAward@gmail.com.

Call for Papers | BU Graduate Symposium, Crowd Control

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 12, 2020

From Boston University:

Crowd Control
The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture
(Online) 23–24 April 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

Crowd control—as both an idea and an act—raises questions about agency, authority, and influence. From ancient Rome to Boston City Hall, state-sponsored architecture has policed the body and shaped the ideal of a citizen.Yet subtler forces such as painting, prints, and photographs also exert powerful influence. The events of this past year have heightened our awareness of both the power of the people and the contours of the systems which surround them. We have seen the wide array of structures that seek to order, pacify, neutralize, inspire, repress, or control the collective. The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture invites submissions examining images, objects, and structures that engage with the regulation and redirection of peoples and their social behaviors.

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: architecture, urbanism, and the organization of private and public spaces; monuments, memory, and civic structures; masquerade, carnival, and festivals; ceremonies and processions; exhibitions and viewing conditions; pilgrimage and religious institutions; protest, policing, the carceral system, and surveillance; population control, eugenics, urban growth and decline; collective and mass culture; conquest, colonialism, coloniality, xenophobia; caste, race, and social hierarchies.

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of study, from any area of study. Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer), a paper title, and a CV to bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2020. Selected speakers will be notified by early February. Papers should be 15 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session. The symposium will be held virtually on Friday, 23 April, and Saturday, 24 April 2021, with a keynote lecture by Dr. Paul Farber, Director of Monument Lab and Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Public Art & Space at the University of Pennsylvania Weitzman School of Design.

This event is generously sponsored by the Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; and the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association.

Call for Papers | Art and Nature

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 11, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

Art and Nature: 6th Conference for Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Students in Humanities and Social Sciences
Online / Center for Iconographic Studes, Rijeka, 8 October 2021

Proposals due by 15 May 2021

This conference will address how the natural world has been presented, reflected or interacted by visual artists through centuries. Papers from PhD students and recent PhD graduates will debate on various topics from the pragmatic view of the natural world, existed simply to serve society, through the idea of natural phenomena, animals, plants etc. as allegories and symbols utilized to draw morality tales or aesthetic principles, which were viewed with as much importance as scientific information, to nature as a source of inspiration for new ideas and movements reflected in the fields of arts. Specific focus is put on the modern technologies and media, as well as the artists’ addressing social and political issues relating to the natural environment.

Topics of the conference include, but are not limited to:
• Art as mirror of nature: interpretation of nature in various historical periods, artistic contexts and individual artistic opuses
• Art and nature: allegoric and symbolic representations, illustrations in the books of nature (botanical and zoological studies), flora and fauna in emblems, design and applied arts;
• Art and natural context: landscape painting, Animalists, Wanderers Art Movement, Land Art, Earth Art, Environmental Art
• Art and new technologies: biotechnological arts (BioArt), Genetic art, Evolutionary art, ethical problems considering using modern technologies and bio materials in art etc.
• Art and contemporary aspects and dilemmas: climate changes, environmental problems, ecological awareness represented through visual arts (EcoArt, Crop art, Sustainable art)

Proposals should be sent to phd.conference2020.lj@gmail.com by 15 May 2021 and should include an abstract of maximum 400 words and a short CV. More information is available here.

Call for Papers | ECRS Series, 2021

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 17, 2020

From ECRS:

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series
(Online) Fortnightly on Wednesdays, from 27 January to 7 April 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar (ECRS) series invites proposals for twenty-minute papers from postgraduate and early career researchers addressing any aspect of eighteenth-century history, culture, literature, art, music, geography, religion, science, and philosophy. The seminar series seeks to provide a regular interdisciplinary forum for postgraduate and early career researchers working on the eighteenth century to meet and discuss their research.

ECRS will be hosted online by the University of Edinburgh. Seminars will take place on Wednesdays between 4:30 and 6:00pm on a fortnightly basis from 27 January to 7 April 2021. Each seminar will consist of two papers.

Abstracts of up to 300 words along with a brief biography and institutional affiliation should be submitted in a Word document to: edinburgh18thcentury@gmail.com. In your email, please also indicate any scheduling restrictions you may have. The closing date for submissions is Tuesday, 15 December 2020.

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar is kindly sponsored by the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century and Enlightenment Studies Network.

Call for Papers | The [After]Lives of Objects

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 16, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

The [After]Lives of Objects: Transposition in the Material World
(Online) University of Virginia Art & Architectural History Graduate Symposium, 18–19 March 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

Transposition involves the movement of people, objects, and ideas from one context to another. The reverberating impacts of such regional and transregional exchanges have shaped artistic expressions, systems of knowledge, and relationships among polities. Recently, scholarship has turned to the object as a material manifestation of cross-cultural, transregional, and imperial encounters. [After]Lives is an interdisciplinary symposium that explores how transposition has materialized throughout history. How are objects changed when they are activated as mediums of encounter? In what ways do makers and users negotiate their positionality between and within societies through objects? How have artists and other creators problematized binary ideas of encounter and exchange in their works? When should adaptations be considered cultural appropriation instead of cross-cultural connectors? Can they be both? What is at stake when materials, artistic techniques, and/or technologies originating from one region are duplicated outside of that region?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Mediation of transcultural encounters through visual and material objects
• Processes of adaptation and assimilation in visual and material culture
• History of looting, collecting, and the art market
• Role of institutions in the (re)contextualization of objects
• Studies that problematize notions of influence, exchange, and reception across social, cultural, and artistic hierarchies
• Imperial and colonial networks of collection, trade, and exchange

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages and areas of study. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a Q&A plenary session. Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Graduate students are invited to submit a CV and an abstract (250 words) in a single PDF file by 15 December 2020 to the symposium committee at uvaartandarch@gmail.com. Applicants will be notified of decisions by 15 January 2021. Limited funds will be available to cover expenses associated with presenting at the symposium.

Keynote Speaker: Kristel Smentek, Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Architecture, MIT | Author of Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (2014) and Objects of Encounter: China in Eighteenth-Century France (forthcoming).