Enfilade

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on December 15, 2020

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award
Applications due by 15 February 2021

Supporting feminist topics in eighteenth-century art history and visual culture

Award Amount: $2000
Eligibility: Doctoral candidates, early career scholars, and contingent faculty who are current members of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) and the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA).
Submission Materials: A 750-word description of the proposed project, a CV, and a budget (as a PDF file or MS Word doc). Please send submissions to MarySheriffAward@gmail.com.

Call for Papers | BU Graduate Symposium, Crowd Control

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 12, 2020

From Boston University:

Crowd Control
The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture
(Online) 23–24 April 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

Crowd control—as both an idea and an act—raises questions about agency, authority, and influence. From ancient Rome to Boston City Hall, state-sponsored architecture has policed the body and shaped the ideal of a citizen.Yet subtler forces such as painting, prints, and photographs also exert powerful influence. The events of this past year have heightened our awareness of both the power of the people and the contours of the systems which surround them. We have seen the wide array of structures that seek to order, pacify, neutralize, inspire, repress, or control the collective. The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture invites submissions examining images, objects, and structures that engage with the regulation and redirection of peoples and their social behaviors.

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: architecture, urbanism, and the organization of private and public spaces; monuments, memory, and civic structures; masquerade, carnival, and festivals; ceremonies and processions; exhibitions and viewing conditions; pilgrimage and religious institutions; protest, policing, the carceral system, and surveillance; population control, eugenics, urban growth and decline; collective and mass culture; conquest, colonialism, coloniality, xenophobia; caste, race, and social hierarchies.

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of study, from any area of study. Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer), a paper title, and a CV to bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2020. Selected speakers will be notified by early February. Papers should be 15 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session. The symposium will be held virtually on Friday, 23 April, and Saturday, 24 April 2021, with a keynote lecture by Dr. Paul Farber, Director of Monument Lab and Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Public Art & Space at the University of Pennsylvania Weitzman School of Design.

This event is generously sponsored by the Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; and the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association.

Call for Papers | Art and Nature

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 11, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

Art and Nature: 6th Conference for Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Students in Humanities and Social Sciences
Online / Center for Iconographic Studes, Rijeka, 8 October 2021

Proposals due by 15 May 2021

This conference will address how the natural world has been presented, reflected or interacted by visual artists through centuries. Papers from PhD students and recent PhD graduates will debate on various topics from the pragmatic view of the natural world, existed simply to serve society, through the idea of natural phenomena, animals, plants etc. as allegories and symbols utilized to draw morality tales or aesthetic principles, which were viewed with as much importance as scientific information, to nature as a source of inspiration for new ideas and movements reflected in the fields of arts. Specific focus is put on the modern technologies and media, as well as the artists’ addressing social and political issues relating to the natural environment.

Topics of the conference include, but are not limited to:
• Art as mirror of nature: interpretation of nature in various historical periods, artistic contexts and individual artistic opuses
• Art and nature: allegoric and symbolic representations, illustrations in the books of nature (botanical and zoological studies), flora and fauna in emblems, design and applied arts;
• Art and natural context: landscape painting, Animalists, Wanderers Art Movement, Land Art, Earth Art, Environmental Art
• Art and new technologies: biotechnological arts (BioArt), Genetic art, Evolutionary art, ethical problems considering using modern technologies and bio materials in art etc.
• Art and contemporary aspects and dilemmas: climate changes, environmental problems, ecological awareness represented through visual arts (EcoArt, Crop art, Sustainable art)

Proposals should be sent to phd.conference2020.lj@gmail.com by 15 May 2021 and should include an abstract of maximum 400 words and a short CV. More information is available here.

Call for Papers | ECRS Series, 2021

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 17, 2020

From ECRS:

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series
(Online) Fortnightly on Wednesdays, from 27 January to 7 April 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar (ECRS) series invites proposals for twenty-minute papers from postgraduate and early career researchers addressing any aspect of eighteenth-century history, culture, literature, art, music, geography, religion, science, and philosophy. The seminar series seeks to provide a regular interdisciplinary forum for postgraduate and early career researchers working on the eighteenth century to meet and discuss their research.

ECRS will be hosted online by the University of Edinburgh. Seminars will take place on Wednesdays between 4:30 and 6:00pm on a fortnightly basis from 27 January to 7 April 2021. Each seminar will consist of two papers.

Abstracts of up to 300 words along with a brief biography and institutional affiliation should be submitted in a Word document to: edinburgh18thcentury@gmail.com. In your email, please also indicate any scheduling restrictions you may have. The closing date for submissions is Tuesday, 15 December 2020.

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar is kindly sponsored by the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century and Enlightenment Studies Network.

Call for Papers | The [After]Lives of Objects

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 16, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

The [After]Lives of Objects: Transposition in the Material World
(Online) University of Virginia Art & Architectural History Graduate Symposium, 18–19 March 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

Transposition involves the movement of people, objects, and ideas from one context to another. The reverberating impacts of such regional and transregional exchanges have shaped artistic expressions, systems of knowledge, and relationships among polities. Recently, scholarship has turned to the object as a material manifestation of cross-cultural, transregional, and imperial encounters. [After]Lives is an interdisciplinary symposium that explores how transposition has materialized throughout history. How are objects changed when they are activated as mediums of encounter? In what ways do makers and users negotiate their positionality between and within societies through objects? How have artists and other creators problematized binary ideas of encounter and exchange in their works? When should adaptations be considered cultural appropriation instead of cross-cultural connectors? Can they be both? What is at stake when materials, artistic techniques, and/or technologies originating from one region are duplicated outside of that region?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Mediation of transcultural encounters through visual and material objects
• Processes of adaptation and assimilation in visual and material culture
• History of looting, collecting, and the art market
• Role of institutions in the (re)contextualization of objects
• Studies that problematize notions of influence, exchange, and reception across social, cultural, and artistic hierarchies
• Imperial and colonial networks of collection, trade, and exchange

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages and areas of study. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a Q&A plenary session. Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Graduate students are invited to submit a CV and an abstract (250 words) in a single PDF file by 15 December 2020 to the symposium committee at uvaartandarch@gmail.com. Applicants will be notified of decisions by 15 January 2021. Limited funds will be available to cover expenses associated with presenting at the symposium.

Keynote Speaker: Kristel Smentek, Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Architecture, MIT | Author of Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (2014) and Objects of Encounter: China in Eighteenth-Century France (forthcoming).

 

Call for Papers | New Directions in 18th- and 19th-Century Art, Season 3

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 16, 2020

From NDENCA:

New Directions in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century, Art Season 3
Digital Seminar Series

Abstracts due by 30 November 2020

This digital seminar series seeks to showcase new and innovative research being undertaken on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century art and its histories. We invite contributions for papers investigating any aspect of the artistic, visual, and material cultures of this period, and produced across the globe. Sessions will be hosted via video conferencing software and will take the form of a 40-minute seminar, with time following for questions.

We welcome proposals from PhD researchers, early career academics and museum professionals, particularly those from underrepresented groups. Please send your abstracts to ndencaseminar@gmail.com.

Fellowships | Tyson Scholars in American Art, 2021–22

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on November 5, 2020

From Crystal Bridges:

Tyson Scholars Program: Fellowships in American Art
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, 2021–22

Applications due by 15 January 2021

The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program supports full-time scholarship and an expansive approach to American art and visual and material culture from the colonial period to the present. The program was established in 2012 through a $5 million commitment from the Tyson family and Tyson Foods, Inc. Since its inception, the Tyson Scholars Program has supported the work of 46 scholars, attracting academic professionals in a variety of disciplines nationally and internationally.

Crystal Bridges and the Tyson Scholars Program invites PhD candidates (or equivalent), post-doctoral researchers and senior scholars from any field who are researching American art to apply. We encourage and support scholarship that seeks to expand boundaries and traditional categories of investigation into American art and visual culture. Applicants may be focusing on art history, architecture, visual and material culture, American studies, craft, Indigenous art, Latin American art, and contemporary art. Applications will be evaluated on the originality and quality of the proposed research project and its contribution to a more equitable and inclusive history of American art.

The Tyson Scholars Program looks for research projects that will intersect meaningfully with the Museum’s collections, library resources, architecture, grounds, curatorial expertise, programs and exhibitions; and/or the University of Arkansas faculty broadly; and applicants should speak to why residence in the Heartland will advance their work. The applicant’s academic standing, scholarly qualifications, and experience will be considered, as it informs the ability of the applicant to complete the proposed project. Letters of support are strongest when they demonstrate the applicant’s excellence, promise, originality, track record, and productivity as a scholar, not when the letter contains a commentary on the project.

Crystal Bridges is dedicated to an equitable, inclusive, and diverse cohort of fellows. We seek applicants who bring a critical perspective and understanding of the experiences of groups historically underrepresented in American art, and welcome applications from qualified persons of color; who are Indigenous; with disabilities; who are LGBTQ; first-generation college graduates; from low-income households; and who are veterans.

Fellowships are residential and support full-time writing and research for terms that range from six weeks to nine months. While in residence, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Stipends vary depending on the duration of residency, position as senior scholar, post-doctoral scholar or pre-doctoral scholar, and range from $15,000 to $30,000 per semester, plus provided housing. Additional funds of $1,500 for relocation are provided, and research funds are available during the residency upon application. Scholars are housed at one of the Crystal Bridges residences, within easy walking distance from the Museum via wooded trails and approximately 1.5 miles from downtown Bentonville. Scholars have private bed and bathrooms in the house, and share comfortable indoor and outdoor common spaces including an expansive yard and patio. Scholars are provided workspace in the curatorial wing of Crystal Bridges’ library. The workspace is an enclosed area shared with other Tyson Scholars. Scholars are provided with basic office supplies, desk space, an office chair, space on a bookshelf, and a locking cabinet with key for personal belongings and files.

Further information about the Tyson Scholars Program, application instructions, and application portal can be found here. Applications for the 2021-2022 academic year open October 19, 2020 and close January 15, 2021.

HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase

Posted in graduate students, lectures (to attend), online learning by Editor on November 2, 2020

George Lambert, Classical Landscape, 1745, oil on canvas, 41 × 46 inches
(London: Tate)

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HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase
Online, Saturday, 7 November 2020, 2:00–3:30pm (EST)

Please mark your calendars for the first HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase on Saturday, November 7, from 2:00 to 3:30pm EST. We will hear from our first seven emerging scholars present their research in 3– to 5–minute presentations, after which we will open up the floor to questions and comments. The intention of these showcases is to create networking opportunities, and we look forward to your audience participation in support of our emerging scholars.

We received an overwhelming number of applications, ranging geographically from China, India, and Australia, to Brazil, Europe, and across the USA. The topics likewise range in their geographical origin, theoretical approach, materials, techniques, and methods. We will also hold two additional showcases on 6 February 2021 and 17 April 2021.

Registration is not required. A Zoom link will be sent out to all HECAA members the week before November 7. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Dani Ezor (dezor@smu.edu). Thank you!

Decorative Arts Trust Awards 13 Research Grants

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on June 4, 2020

Grant recipient Isabella Rosner will research Quaker makers of shell and wax work boxes. Mary Morrison, wax and shellwork shadow box, 1769, Philadelphia (Chester County Historical Society).  

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Press release (27 May 2020) from the Decorative Arts Trust:

The Decorative Arts Trust is pleased to announce the thirteen recipients of their 2020 Summer Research Grants, representing diverse cultures, materials, time periods, and geographies. Each year the Trust awards research grants to graduate students working on a Master’s thesis or PhD dissertation in a field related to the decorative arts. The Trust encourages projects that advance diversity in the study of American decorative arts. The word ‘summer’ may be a misnomer this year, as the Trust extended the terms of the grants to include travel through spring of 2021 due to potential restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Trust also partners with other organizations to offer grants sponsored by the Marie & John Zimmermann Fund, the Decorative Arts Society of Orange County, and the Center for American Art.

The deadline to apply for Decorative Arts Trust Summer Research Grants is April 30 annually. For more information, visit decorativeartstrust.org or email thetrust@decorativeartstrust.org.

Kayle R. Avery
Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, Winterthur, University of Delaware
Avery will examine the digitization of modernist American concepts through the incorporation of Art Deco aesthetics in the BioShock video game franchise. His plans to study collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, and the New-York Historical Society’s Print Ephemera Collection.

Elizabeth S. Browne
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Browne will travel to examine the archives of the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres in France to study 18th-century French sculptor Clodion (Claude Michel) and the Sèvres’ serialization called the ‘Vases Clodion’.

Christina L. De León
Bard Graduate Center 
De León will study the reinterpretation of the butaca by 20th-century designers Josef Albers and Clara Porset at the Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut. Marie Zimmerman Grant.

Catherine Doucette
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Doucette will continue her study of a 19th-century tilt-top table, veneered with Jamaican woods and bearing images of the British Empire, made in Jamaica by the colony’s leading craftsman, Ralph Turnbull by visiting the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Yale Center for British Art.

Lamar Gayles
University of Illinois Chicago
Gayles will research the fabrication techniques and material mnemonics in the work of 20th-century Black American craftspersons by visiting collections in Alabama, Georgia, Chicago, and Washington, D.C.

Robert Gordon-Fogelson
University of Southern California
Gordon-Fogelson plans to research the work of mid-century designers Dave Chapman, George Nelson, and Walter Dorwin Teague as well as the Industrial Designers Society of America at the Research and Design Institute at Syracuse University’s Special Collections Research Center.

Cecilia Gunzburger
University of Virginia
Gunzburger will continue her study of the traditions and ornamental function of 16th-century European lace and related textiles at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Cynthia Kok
Yale University
Kok will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore to research snuffboxes made of mother-of-pearl, shell, and imitative materials and decorative styles.

Kayli Rideout
Boston University
Rideout will visit Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia to study ecclesiastical windows that Tiffany Studios was commissioned to create in memory of the Confederacy in the years between 1889 and 1925.

Isabella Rosner
King’s College London
Rosner will visit several collections in the Philadelphia region to understand more about Quaker women who made shell and wax work boxes.

Cambra Sklarz
University of California, Riverside
Sklarz will travel to Winterthur to examine ways that artists from approximately 1750 to 1860 incorporated waste or discarded goods into their decorative arts and practices. DARTS Grant.

Paige Weaver
University of South Carolina
Weaver will explore The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute and American Wing to evaluate a wide range of clothing, silver, and metalwork from the Reconstruction Era.

Xiaoyi D. Yang
Bard Graduate Center
Yang aims to continue her investigation of the circulation and consumption of Zhangzhou porcelains in Tokugawa-era commercial and cultural centers by visiting ceramic collections in Tokyo and Kyoto.

Call for Papers | Ma thèse en histoire de l’art en 180 secondes

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on February 29, 2020

From ArtHist.net:

Ma thèse en histoire de l’art en 180 secondes
Festival de l’histoire de l’art, Fontainebleau, 5–7 June 2020

Proposals due by 15 March 2020

La 10e édition du Festival de l’histoire de l’art aura lieu à Fontainebleau les vendredi 5, samedi 6 et dimanche 7 juin 2020 avec le Japon comme pays invité. Le thème fédérateur choisi cette année est le Plaisir. Dans le cadre de cette édition, il est proposé aux doctorants de participer au concours « Ma thèse d’histoire de l’art en 180 secondes ».

Chaque candidat disposera de trois minutes (180 secondes) pour réaliser un exposé clair et concis de son projet de recherche. Les présentations réalisées par les candidats retenus devront convaincre deux jurys composés d’historiens de l’art et de professionnels. A l’issue du concours, trois prix seront attribués aux trois meilleurs orateurs.
Premier prix: 1000€
Deuxième prix: 500€
Troisième prix: 500€

Les frais de transport et d’hébergement des participants hors région parisienne seront pris en charge sur présentation de justificatifs (jusqu’à 150€).