Enfilade

PhD Opportunity | Women, Art Making, and the English Country House

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on April 8, 2022

Mirabel Jane Neville[?], mid-nineteenth-century watercolour of the Saloon at Audley End, Essex.

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From the project announcement:

‘Spaces of Femininity’: Making Art and Craft in the English Country House, c.1750–1900
AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership
PhD Project supervised by Kate Retford and Peter Moore, starting 1 October 2022

Applications due by 9 May 2022

Birkbeck, University of London and English Heritage are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded collaborative doctoral studentship, from October 2022. This is to undertake research into the artistic production of women in country houses in the later eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, using English Heritage properties as case studies. This PhD project will be jointly supervised by Professor Kate Retford (History of Art Department, Birkbeck) and Dr. Peter Moore (Curator of Collections and Interiors, Audley End and Wrest Park). The closing date is Monday, 9 May 2022, 5pm.

Country houses are full of ‘amateur’ art work—particularly the work of the wives and daughters who lived in them, and particularly from the later Georgian and Victorian periods when such practice flourished, and the commercial sector developed to support it (providing instruction manuals, materials, tutors etc). This ranges from drawings, etchings and watercolours through to objects such as containers crafted from shell work, panelled folding screens showcasing petit-point needlework and hand painted ceramics. The houses managed by English Heritage are no exception. The student will select case studies from amongst properties such as Audley End, Wrest Park, and Brodsworth, considering objects and interiors still at the houses, as well as material now in other public or private collections.

The student has the scope to develop both the topic and approach, in conjunction with the supervisors, but proposed research questions include:
1  What kinds of work did these women produce? In which genres and media did they work?
2  Why did they produce such work? A popular contemporary stereotype presented this as a genteel accomplishment, of particular value in the marriage market: does this hold up?
3  What did these women do with such work? Was it intended for display, whether in their own home or elsewhere? To what extent did this creative practice support familial and social networks through exchange of these objects?
4  What relationship did these women have with the ‘professional’ art world? What instruction manuals and other pedagogic literature did they consult? What commercially produced materials did they use? Who taught them, and how did tutoring work in practice? How did they engage with the organisations that provided training, prizes and opportunities for exhibiting work?
5  What can this work tell us about women’s historical experience? What can it tell us about their daily lives and personal relationships? What can it tell us about their relationships with their houses and landscapes?
6  What can this work tell us about the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century domestic interior? How did these objects relate to the décor and furnishings designed and created by professionals?

This studentship will provide the student with both invaluable academic skills and experience of working in the heritage sector. It will involve the student in a range of interdisciplinary research activities, drawing on archival and primary textual material and working closely with collections and interiors. In addition to preparing the PhD thesis, it is envisaged that the student will also be engaged in a range of related activities such as cataloguing and interpretation work, and to take the lead on a temporary display at Audley End. They will also be expected to play a full role in the research cultures of both institutions.

Additional information is available here»

 

PhD Opportunity | The Material Culture of Saltram, 1725–1840

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 27, 2022

Saltram House, near Plymouth in Devon, England; in 1957 the house was donated by the Parker family to the National Trust (Photo: National Trust). More information is available here.

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From the project description:

Global Connections and Local Contexts: The Material Culture of Saltram, c.1725–1840
Applications due by 20 February 2022

The global links of country houses have attracted considerable attention in recent years, but the furore over colonialism has tended to overshadow the supply and materiality of global goods and the ways in which these artefacts were integrated into a wider array of goods of local and European provenance. Saltram, with its mix of British, European, and global objects, forms a perfect collection through which to explore these issues.

The project explores global-local interaction through the belongings and consumption practices of the Parker family in the period 1725–1840. Perhaps best known for its Robert Adam interiors and Reynolds paintings, Saltram also has a range of Asian objects, including Chinese wallpapers and porcelain, and items of high quality European furniture and porcelain, as well as a large collection of mahogany furniture made in British workshops. These combine with a varied archival collection that is especially rich in family correspondence.

The project seeks to entangle the global with the local by exploring the consumption practices and motivations of the Parker family. This will provide a better understanding of the significance of global goods as one part of the material culture of the country house, set within the context of locality, domestic space, and family relations, the broader influences of taste and fashion, and the commercial worlds of international trade and manufacturing.

The project is framed by four key research questions:
1. What was the origin of goods within the collection and what were the routes of supply through which they came to Saltram? This allows the shifting relative importance of global goods to be assessed and places the house at the centre of local, national, European and global networks of supply.
2. What were the material and behavioural contexts in which these things were displayed, used and consumed? This means: assessing where things were located in the house and garden, how were they used and by whom; and exploring the history of display.
3. How were individual and assemblages of objects linked to personal identity and how did they reflect and shape the character of the house? What motivations underpinned the consumption of these goods, and what meaning did they hold for their owners?
4. How can these tangled histories be related to visitors to include and engage local and diverse audiences? This involves understanding and evaluating audience expectations and engagement.

The student is encouraged to define their own doctoral research project within these broad parameters. The research results will inform a range of public-facing outputs at Saltram. Indeed, a core aim of the project is to identify ways to quickly embed new research findings into public programming and the student will work closely with the engagement as well as the curatorial team. The project thus has the potential to make an important contribution to how the National Trust at Saltram tells a greater variety of stories to more diverse audiences. The student will receive training from the curatorial and conservation team on object handling and the NT’s collections management system and from the engagement team on audience engagement and partnership working.

Candidate Requirements
In addition to our standard entry requirements, applicants should have:
• Masters in an appropriate discipline at merit or distinction OR equivalent experience working in the heritage sector
• Knowledge of the history/arthistory/heritage of the English country house
• Experience of undertaking research using archives or material objects
• Ability to work independently, as an effective part of a team, and with members of the public
• The student will need to be willing and able to travel between Manchester and Saltram

This opportunity includes fees funding plus an annual stipend at the Research Council minimum rate (set by UKRI), which for 2021/22 is £15,609 per annum for home and overseas applicants.

Interested applicants should contact are welcome to contact Professor Jon Stobart for an informal discussion. For application details, please consult the project description available as a PDF file here. The closing date is 20th February 2022.

Online Talks | HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase

Posted in graduate students, lectures (to attend), online learning by Editor on November 13, 2021

This afternoon!

HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase
Online, Saturday, 13 November 2021, 2:00–3:30pm (EST)

A reminder to join us for our HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase on Saturday, 13 November, 2:00–3:30pm, EST. Please register via the zoom link below to hear our first seven emerging scholars present their research. Each participant will present for 3–5 minutes, and after all of the presentations we will host a question and answer session. Zoom Registration Link. Also, please also mark your calendars for our next Emerging Scholars Showcase to be held on Saturday, 23 April 2022.

Best wishes,
HECAA Board

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1  Deborah A. Fisher (Independent Scholar / PhD, Penn State University, 2021), The Metamorphoses of John Singleton Copley: Mythological Characters in American Colonial Portraiture

2  Samantha Happe (University of Melbourne), Between Isfahan and Versailles: Royal Diplomatic Gift Exchange in the Eighteenth Century

3  Philippe Halbert (Yale University), Letters of a Canadian Woman: Identity and the Self-Fashioning in the Atlantic World of Madame Bégon, 1696–1755

4  Cynthia Volk (Bard Graduate Center), Dehua Porcelain Figures of Budai: Models of Adaptivity in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century China and Europe

5  Zoë Dostal (Columbia University), Rope, Linen, Thread: Gender, Labor, and the Textile Industry in Eighteenth-Century British Art

6  Alyse Muller (Columbia University), Between Land and Sea: French Maritime Imagery in the Long Eighteenth Century

7  Andrea Morgan (Independent Scholar / PhD, Queen’s University, 2021), Frances Reynolds and Mary Nugent-Temple-Grenville, Marchioness of Buckingham: Female Artists in the Orbit of Sir Joshua Reynolds

Call for Papers | Emerging Scholars Showcase, Fall 2021

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on September 27, 2021

From HECAA:

HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase
Online, 13 November 2021

Proposals due by 3 October 2021

Building on the success of last year’s Emerging Scholars Showcase (7 November, 6 February, and 17 April)—with kudos to Dani Ezor—the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) is pleased to again invite emerging scholars studying the art, architecture, and visual culture of the long eighteenth century around the globe to participate in a virtual showcase. Our hope is to provide a platform for early career scholars to promote their own research, as well as a forum for networking opportunity and ongoing community building.

Each scholar will be given 3–5 minutes to present their work, followed by an open question and answer session. This year’s Emerging Scholars Showcase will be held on Saturday, 13 November 2021, though additional sessions may be added depending on interest. To apply, please fill out this form. Applications are due by Sunday, 3 October, at midnight (EST). Please direct any questions to Daniella Berman, daniella.berman@nyu.edu.

Emerging Scholars do not need to be current HECAA members and may be current graduate students (MAs or PhDs) and those who have received their PhDs in the past five years, so please circulate this call as appropriate. If you are interested in helping to organize the HECAA Emerging Scholars Showcase, please also contact Daniella Berman (the current HECAA graduate student board member at-large).

Student Funding | Research Related to Castletown House, County Kildare

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on August 16, 2021

From the application form:

Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary
Applications due by 13 November 2021

The Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary was established in 2017 in honour of the late Professor Nowlan, who chaired the Castletown Foundation for more than three decades. The scholarship, advertised biannually, aims to further research on the history, architecture, collections, and estate of Castletown House in County Kildare. Applicants must be registered students and engaged in research which focuses on or relates to Castletown. The award of €2,000 may be used for research-related expenses or University fees. The selection committee will be composed of members of the Castletown Foundation and one external specialist. The scholarship need not be awarded in any one year, and the decision of the assessors is final.

Applicants must complete this form and submit it by email to Professor Christine Casey, caseych@tcd.ie, and Dr. Alison FitzGerald, alison.fitzgerald@mu.ie, by 5pm, Friday, 13 November 2021, with the subject line ‘Kevin B. Nowlan Castletown Bursary’. A confidential reference supporting the application must arrive separately, before the closing date.

HECAA Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet

Posted in graduate students, Member News by Editor on June 27, 2021

HECAA Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet
Thursday, 1 July 2021, 5.30–6.30pm (EDT)

Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA) is pleased to announce the first Emerging Scholars’ (Virtual) Meet-and-Greet. Come meet other HECAA emerging scholars* and chat casually about your work and about what kind of programming or resources you would like HECAA to put together to serve this constituency.

Please register here:

https://nyu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUvd-qtqD4pHdIm4F3fkrj1l869FAAuf6er

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. If you cannot join this meet-up but have ideas or concerns to share, please reach out to Daniella Berman, At-Large Board Member/Graduate Student Representative: daniella.berman@nyu.edu. Please circulate widely to colleagues and students. This meet-up is open to non-HECAA members interested in getting a sense for our community.

* There’s no cut-off for this emerging scholars’ group; please self-identify as you see fit!

2019 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Very belated congratulations! I would expect the 2020 listing to be available in June or July. CH

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2019 lists four ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Katherine Calvin, “Antiquity and Empire: The Construction of History in Western European Representations of the Ottoman Empire, 1650–1830” (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, M. Sheriff and C. Johns)

• Bart Pushaw, “The Global Invention of Art: Race and Visual Sovereignity in the Colonial Baltic, 1860–1915” (University of Maryland, College Park, S. Mansbach)

• Leslie E. Todd, “Reconciling Colonial Contradictions: The Multiple Roles of Sculpture in Eighteenth-Century Quito” (University of Florida, M. Stanfield-Mazzi)

• Hye-shim Yi, “Art, Materiality, and Intermediality: The Multimedia Writing Practice of Chen Hongshou (1768–1822)” (UCLA, H. Lee)

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and fifteen ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Jacob Leveton, “William Blake’s Radical Ecology” (Northwestern University, S. Eisenman)

• Kelsey Martin, “Graveuses en taille-douce: French Women Engravers from the Ancien Regime to the Napoleonic Empire (1660–1815)” (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, M. Hyde)

• Saylor, Miranda, “Sor María de Ágreda and Sacred Art in Eighteenth-Century Mexico” (UCLA, C. Villaseñor-Black)

2018 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2018 lists six ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Alissa Adams, “French Depictions of Napoleon I’s Resurrection, 1821–1848” (The University of Iowa, D. Johnson)

• Kelsey Brosnan, ““Seductive Surfaces: The Still Life Paintings of Anne Vallayer-Coster (1744–1818)” (Rutgers University, S. Sidlauskas)

• Monica Hahn, “Go-Between Portraits and the Imperial Imagination, circa 1800” (Temple University, E. Pauwels)

• Laurel O. Peterson, “Making Spaces: Art and Politics in the Whig Country House, 1688–1745” (Yale University, T. Barringer)

• Mei Rado, “The Empire’s New Cloth: Western Textiles and Imperial Identity at the Eighteenth-Century Qing Court” (Bard Graduate Center, F. Louis)

• Sarah Sylvester Williams, “After Watteau: Nicolas Lancret and the Creation of the Hunt Luncheon” (University of Missouri, M. Yonan)

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and forty-five ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Wenjie Su, “Machines of Time, Towers of Knowledge: Miniature Architectural Spaces and the Design of Timepieces in Sino-European Encounters, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries” (Princeton, T. DaCosta Kaufmann)

• Emily K. Thames, “Enlightenment, Reform, and Identity in Late Eighteenth-Century Puerto Rico: The Art of José Campeche (1751–1809)” (Florida State University, P. Niell)

2017 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 2, 2021

Each year, CAA publishes titles of dissertations in-progress and completed during the previous academic year by students at American and Canadian institution.

The index for 2017 lists nine ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Kasie Alt, “Culture of Illusion: Landscape Gardens, Fabricated Ruins, and the Diorama, ca. 1750–1850” (University of Texas at Austin, M. Charlesworth)

• Emily Casey, “Waterscapes: Representing the Sea in the American Imagination, 1750–1800” (University of Delaware, W. Bellion)

• Kathryn Desplanque, “Art, Commerce, and Caricature: Satirical Images of Artistic Life in Paris, 1750–1850” (Duke University, N. McWilliam)

• Lauren Kellogg DiSalvo, “Micromosaics: Souvenirs, Collective Memory, and the Reception of Antiquity on the Grand Tour” (University of Missouri, K. Slane and M. Yonan)

• Alexandra Helprin, “The Sheremetevs and the Argunovs: Art, Serfdom, and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century Russia” (Columbia University, A. Higonnet)

• Barbara M. Laux, “Claude III Audran, Modern Ornemaniste of the Rococo Style” (Graduate Center, CUNY, P. Mainardi)

• Tamar Mayer, “Consequences of Drawing: Self and History in Jacques-Louis David’s Preparatory Practices” (University of Chicago, R. Ubl, M. Ward)

• Kelly Presutti, “Terroir after the Terror: Landscape and Representation in Nineteenth-Century France” (MIT, K. Smentek)

• Michael Traver Ridlen, “Prud’hon’s Evolving Classicism” (The University of Iowa, D. Johnson)

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and thirty-one ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Lilit Sadoyan, “Meuble and Mobility: Furniture in Long-Eighteenth-Century France” (University of California, Santa Barbara, E. B. Robertson and M. Meadow)

• Luciano Vanni, “The Renovation of the Habsburg-Lorraine Residences: Eighteenth-Century Imperial and Archducal Palaces in Prague, Brussels, and Florence” (Princeton, T. DaCosta Kaufmann)

 

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award

Posted in fellowships, graduate students by Editor on December 15, 2020

Mary D. Sheriff Travel and Research Award
Applications due by 15 February 2021

Supporting feminist topics in eighteenth-century art history and visual culture

Award Amount: $2000
Eligibility: Doctoral candidates, early career scholars, and contingent faculty who are current members of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) and the Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture (HECAA).
Submission Materials: A 750-word description of the proposed project, a CV, and a budget (as a PDF file or MS Word doc). Please send submissions to MarySheriffAward@gmail.com.

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