Enfilade

PhD Studentship | 18th-Century British Women Printmakers

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 5, 2017

From Birkbeck College:

PhD Studentship | Making an Impression: British Women Printmakers in the Eighteenth Century
V&A / Birkbeck College, University of London, starting October 2017

Applications due by 23 May 2017

Angelica Kauffman, Juno, etching, London, 1770 (London: V&A, E.350-1890).

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD studentship researching the role, status and output of amateur and professional women printmakers in Britain during the long eighteenth century, drawing on the Victoria & Albert Museum’s strong collections of work by women printmakers of this period. The project will reconstruct and investigate the work of a number of women artists who have long been overlooked, thereby making a significant contribution to the history of art, design and the print.

This project will be supervised by Dr Kate Retford, Senior Lecturer in History of Art (Birkbeck College, University of London), who specialises in eighteenth-century British art, particularly gender and portraiture, and Dr Sarah Grant, Curator of Prints at the V&A, whose research interests encompass eighteenth-century prints, women artists, and female patronage.
Deadline: 5pm, Tuesday, 23 May 2017
More information is available here»

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Study Day | First Look: Portrait Medals

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 15, 2017

From H-ArtHist:

First Look: Portrait Medals Study Day
The Frick Collection, New York, 24 March 2017

Applications due by 7 February 2017

The Frick Collection invites applications for First Look: Portrait Medals Study Day, a program for graduate students organized in anticipation of the special exhibition The Pursuit of Immortality: Masterpieces from the Scher Collection of Portrait Medals (opening May 9, 2017). The Scher Collection—the largest and most significant collection of portrait medals in private hands—has been given in part to the Frick; the exhibition celebrates this gift and explores the art of the medal from its invention in the Renaissance through the 19th century, and its histories in Italy, Germany, France, the Netherlands, England, Russia and Scandinavia, Mexico, and the United States. Long considered a specialist field of study, portrait medals have been the focus of increasing scholarly attention. Recent studies have explored, for example, their function as a medium of commemoration, their role in social and cultural exchange, and their efficacy as reproducible vehicles of representation and identity.

Applications are welcome from students in all disciplines; participants need not have prior experience in the field of medallic art. The study day centers on the essential experience of handling a wide range of superlative examples from the Scher Collection in advance of their installation in the exhibition galleries. Session leaders, who will engage the art of the medal from various perspectives, include Aimee Ng (Associate Curator, The Frick Collection), Marisa Bass (Assistant Professor of the History of Art, Yale University), and Stephen Scher (collector and art historian). Admission is limited due to the hands-on nature of the program. Please submit a brief statement of interest (max. 250 words) and CV to edevents@frick.org by Tuesday, February 7, 2017. Accepted applicants will be notified by Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

PhD Studentship | Digital Humanities and Sloane’s Catalogues

Posted in graduate students by Editor on December 23, 2016

PhD Studentship in Digital Humanities: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of His Collections
Department of Information Studies, University College London, January 2017 — December 2019

Applications due by 16 January 2017

We are delighted to be able to announce a Doctoral Studentship in Digital Humanities at University College London as part of the larger Leverhulme Trust funded research project Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of his Collections (Principal Investigator, Dr Kim Sloan, British Museum; Co-Investigator, Dr Julianne Nyhan, University College London Centre for Digital Humanities). This is a three-year studentship open to UK and EU applicants, beginning in January 2017. The studentship includes fees as well as a stipend of £16,296 per annum. The deadline for application is 16 January 2017.

The aim of the studentship will be to use Sloane’s catalogues as a test bed on which to conduct research on how digital interrogation, inferencing and analysis techniques can allow new knowledge to be created about the information architectures of manuscript catalogues such as those of Sloane. The proposed research must also have a strong critical and analytical dimension so that it can be set within our wider framework of academic inquiry that is concerned with understanding how collections and their documentation together formed a cornerstone of the ‘laboratories’ of the emergent Enlightenment. . .

More information is available here»

2017 Scholar-in-Residence Program, Hillwood Estate in D.C.

Posted in graduate students, museums, opportunities by Editor on December 17, 2016

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Abraham and David Roentgen, Rolltop Desk, 1765–70, wood marquetry, mother-of-pearl, gilt bronze, steel, leather, glass, 46 × 42 × 25 inches (Washington, D.C., Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens).

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2017 Scholar-in-Residence Program
Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, Washington, D.C.

Applications due by 15 February 2017

PhD candidates and other highly qualified scholars conducting research that may benefit from Hillwood’s holdings are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae and a proposal—not to exceed 500 words—stating the necessary length of residence, materials to be used, and the project’s relevance to Hillwood’s collections or exhibition program, including, but not limited to: art and architecture, landscape design, conservation and restoration, archives, library or special collections, as well as broader study areas such as the history of collecting or material culture. The project description should be accompanied by two letters of recommendation. Materials will be reviewed by the selection committee. There are three types of awards:

1 Week
Hillwood will arrange and pay for travel costs to and from the museum; housing near campus; shop and café discounts; free access to all public programs.

2–3 Weeks
Hillwood will arrange and pay for travel costs to and from the museum; shop and café discounts; free access to all public programs; a stipend of up to $1,200 depending on length of stay.

1–2 Months
Hillwood will arrange and pay for travel costs to and from the museum; shop and café discounts; free access to all public programs; a stipend of up to $1,500 per month depending on length of stay.

Founded by Marjorie Merriweather Post (1887–1973), heir to the Post Cereal Company, which later became General Foods, the Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens houses over 17,000 works of art. Hillwood is in a special class of cultural heritage institution as a historic site, testament to the life of an important 20th-century figure, an estate campus, magnificent garden, and a museum with world renowned special collections. It includes one of the largest and most important collections of Russian art outside of Russia, comprising pieces from the pre-Petrine to early Soviet periods, an outstanding collection of French and European art, and jewelry, textile, fashion, and accessories collections. Scholars will have access to Hillwood’s art and research collections based on accessibility and staff availability. The Library has over 38,000 volumes including monographs, serials, annotated and early auction catalogues, and electronic resources; the Archives contain the papers of Marjorie Merriweather Post, her staff, and family members. Please submit applications or inquiries to Scholarinresidence@hillwoodmuseum.org by 15 February 2017 (applicants will be notified by 13 March 2017).

 

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Call for Papers | Design and Displacement: Graduate Student Symposium

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 12, 2016

From H-ArtHist:

Design and Displacement
26th Annual Parsons/Cooper Hewitt Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Design
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, New York, 7–8 April 2017

Proposals due by 23 January 2017

The challenges faced by vast numbers of migrants and refugees worldwide—uprooted by war, persecution, or ecological crises or relocating in search of economic opportunity—are giving rise to innovative design solutions. Although often urgent, these crises are unfortunately rarely new. This symposium attempts to take a broader historical view of the relationship of design and decorative arts to the displacement and movement of people and populations since the Renaissance. From French Huguenot artisans emigrating to England in the early 18th century to artisans exiled in the wake of the 1848 revolutions to the Bauhaus’s re-establishment after its dissolution by the fascists to designers’ migrations all over the world, the movement of populations has spurred great change in the cultural landscape, including the creation of opportunities for new cross-cultural synthesis. Migrations also inspire architectural solutions, such as temporary housing for displaced persons during wartime or natural disasters or more substantial interventions into the landscape, such as buildings erected to accommodate the exponential growth of cities like Lagos or Rio de Janeiro. Papers might consider historical or contemporary designers or whole populations. The symposium also seeks to address issues of national and transnational identity as well as anti-immigrant sentiment.

Proposals are welcome from graduate students at any level in fields such as art history, history of design, design studies, fashion studies, history of the decorative arts, urban studies, cultural anthropology, history of architecture, consumer studies, design and technology, media studies, museum studies, food studies.

The symposium’s Catherine Hoover Voorsanger Keynote speaker will be Jeremy Aynsley, professor of design history at the University of Brighton (UK) and chair of the Design History Society. Professor Aynsley’s research interests concern late-19th- and 20th-century design in Europe and the United States, with a particular focus on design in modern Germany, which he has explored in major exhibitions and academic publications including Nationalism and Internationalism in Design in the 20th Century (1994), Graphic Design in Germany 1890–1945 (2000), and Designing Modern Germany (2009). He is especially interested in the phenomenon of the migration of Modernism and is currently working on a project about German graphic designers in the United States on the eve of World War II. The keynote address will be given on Friday evening, April 7, 2017, and the symposium sessions will be held in the morning and afternoon of Saturday, April 8.

To submit a proposal, send a two-page abstract, one-page bibliography, and a CV to Ethan Robey, Associate Director, MA Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies, robeye@newschool.edu.

The symposium is sponsored by the MA History of Design and Curatorial Studies program, offered jointly by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and Parsons School of Design.

U of Michigan Graduate Symposium: All That Glitters

Posted in conferences (to attend), graduate students by Editor on November 11, 2016

The day’s presentations include these eighteenth-century papers:

All That Glitters: Magnificence in Art, Architecture, and Visual Culture
2016 Graduate Symposium
University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, 12 November 2016

• Philippe L. B. Halbert (Yale University), ‘Our Colony Has Today Become Opulent’: Material Magnificence in the French Atlantic World, 1660–1789
• Emily Anderson (University of Southern California), Magnificent Macabre: The Engravings of the Anatomical Preparations of Frederik Ruysch

HGSCEA Essay Prize for Emerging Scholars

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on October 27, 2016

From H-ArtHist:

Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art
Fifth Annual Essay Prize for Emerging Scholars

Nominations due by 19 December 2016

Submissions are now being accepted for the fifth annual HGSCEA Emerging Scholars Publication Prize, an award of $500 given to the author of a distinguished essay published the preceding year on any topic in the history of German, Central European, or Scandinavian art, architecture, design, or visual culture. Submissions, which must be in English and may be from electronic or print publications, must have a publication date of 2016; authors must be either current PhD students or have earned a PhD in or after 2012 and must be members of HGSCEA at the time of submission. The recipient of the Prize and one honorable mention will be chosen by the members of the HGSCEA Board and announced at the HGSCEA dinner reception during the College Art Association annual conference. Nominations and self-nominations are welcome; submissions should include a copy of the publication and a CV and should be sent by electronic attachment to the HGSCEA president Marsha Morton (mortonmarsha10@gmail.com) before December 19, 2016.

A-Levels in Art History to End in 2018

Posted in graduate students by Editor on October 24, 2016

From Apollo:

Ben Street, “Make No Mistake, Art History Is a Hard Subject. What’s Soft Is the Decision to Scrap It,” Apollo (15 October 2016).

So: art history A-level is to be scrapped in 2018. However much they protest the fact, the decision taken by the exam board AQA seems related to the Conservative government’s policy of ranking subjects by perceived relative difficulty, using an analogy of ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ that seems designed to belittle students and teachers who’ve apparently taken the easy way out. AQA deny this. Their claim is that art history—ditched along with archaeology and classical civilisation, whose demise has raised much less of a public fuss, for which you can provide your own punchline—is too difficult to mark successfully in an exam setting. It’s too ‘complex and specialist’, apparently. Too ‘hard’, in other words. . . .

Call for Papers | Trashed: Rejection and Recovery

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on October 14, 2016

From Boston University:

Trashed: Rejection and Recovery in the History of Art and Architecture
33rd Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art and Architecture
Boston University, 24–25 March 2017

Proposals due by 21 November 2016

What happens to the ideas and materials that end up in the scrap bin of history? While some projects are laid to waste, others are repurposed or reimagined. The 33rd Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art and Architecture invites submissions that explore themes of dispensability and resourcefulness.

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: spolia; creative use of recycled materials; deletions and deaccessioned objects; abandoned or reclaimed architectural spaces; drafts, drawings, or models for unrealized works; and the impact of unfavorable reception, as dictated by time, place, or audience. We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of their studies, working in any area or discipline.

Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Please send an abstract (300 words or less), a paper title, and a CV to bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is Monday, November 21, 2016. Selected speakers will be notified before January 1, 2017 and are expected to accept or decline the offer within a week of notification. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session.

The Symposium will be held Friday, March 24 – Saturday, March 25, 2017, with a keynote lecture (TBD) on Friday evening at the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery and graduate presentations on Saturday in the Riley Seminar Room of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

This event is generously sponsored by The Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association; and the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery.

Research Project | Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues

Posted in graduate students, museums, opportunities by Editor on October 5, 2016

From the project announcement:

Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of His Collections
Leverhulme Trust Research Project, Autumn 2016 — 30 September 2019

Applications due by 31 October 2016

We are delighted to be able to announce the inception of Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of His Collections, a new research project based at the British Museum in collaboration with the Department of Information Studies at University College London. Enlightenment Architectures will start on 3 October 2016 and will run for three years until 30 September 2019.

The project has received generous funding from the Leverhulme Trust in the form of a Research Project Grant totalling £332,552 awarded to the British Museum, where Dr Kim Sloan is the Principal Investigator. The Co-Investigator on the project is Dr Julianne Nyhan and the Senior Research Assistant is Dr Martha Fleming. The grant will also accommodate two Post Doctoral Research Assistantships and one Doctoral Studentship. The call for applications for the PDRA positions are live now on the British Museum jobs website. The call for applications for the Doctoral Studentship will appear shortly on the University College London jobs website.

The objective of Enlightenment Architectures: Sir Hans Sloane’s Catalogues of His Collections is to understand the intellectual structures of Sloane’s own manuscript catalogues of his collections and with them the origins of the Enlightenment disciplines and information management practices they helped to shape. The project will employ a pioneering interdisciplinary combination of curatorial, traditional humanities and Digital Humanities research to examine Sloane’s catalogues which reveal the way in which he and his contemporaries collected, organised and classified the world, through their descriptions, cross-references and codes. The project will draw on the research framework that emerged from the 2012 AHRC-funded Sloane’s Treasures workshops, and findings will make significant contributions to histories of information science, histories of collections, and philosophy of knowledge, and will benefit a wide range of other disciplines as well.

Six manuscript catalogues created from 1680 to 1753 and selected from across the three institutions now holding Sloane’s materials—the British Museum, the British Library, and the Natural History Museum—will be transcribed and closely analysed by the interdisciplinary research team with the assistance of curatorial support from those three institutions. Regular workshops between curators, humanities researchers, and digital humanities practitioners will produce a deeper understanding of the structure and content of the catalogues. This will be disseminated through
• scholarly publications and conference contributions
• focused workshops and a project website
• a prototype linked data ontology for use in digital analysis of early modern collections

We look forward to communicating with you about our work, and welcome contributions from the wide-ranging scholarly communities whose disciplines will participate in and benefit from this research. We ask you to assist us in disseminating the announcements for the two Post Doctoral Research Associateships and the Doctoral Studentship and would ask you to alert colleagues and students who are eligible and appropriate to apply. As this is a Leverhulme Grant, the Doctoral Studentship is open to the EU as well as to UK applicants. The Research Associateships are open to international applicants.

With very best regards,
Dr Kim Sloan and Dr Julianne Nyhan

Partners
The British Museum
University College London Centre for Digital Humanities

Project Team
Kim Sloan is Curator of British Drawings and Watercolours before 1880 and the Francis Finlay Curator of the Enlightenment Gallery at the British Museum.
Julianne Nyhan is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Digital Information Studies at UCL’s Department of Information Studies.
Martha Fleming is a specialist in collections-based research and an historian of science.