Enfilade

PhD Research Residencies | Naples, 2019–20

Posted in graduate students by Editor on December 12, 2018

Pierre-Jacques Volaire, Eruption of Vesuvius, oil on canvas, 1769
(Naples: Museo di Capodimonte)

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For PhD students working on the cultural history of Naples who need access to materials in southern Italy including artworks, sites, archives, and libraries. From H-ArtHist:

Research Residencies, 2019–20
Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities, Naples

Applications due by 15 February 2019

Opened in Fall 2018, the Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities / Centro per la Storia dell’Arte e dell’Architettura delle Città Portuali is a collaboration between the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte in Naples and the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at the University of Texas at Dallas, with the participation of the Université Paris-Sorbonne.

Housed within the Capodimonte’s bosco in a rustic eighteenth-century agricultural building called La Capraia (the goat farm), the Center is a laboratory for new research in the cultural histories of port cities and the mobilities of artworks, people, technologies, and ideas. Research and programs at La Capraia are dedicated to exploring global histories of art, architecture, and cultural production, while grounded in direct study of artworks, sites, and materials in Naples as well as southern Italy. Through Research Residencies and regular site-based Research Workshops and Symposia, the Center at La Capraia supports scholarly access to Naples, fosters new research on Naples and on other port cities, and creates a network of students and scholars working on related projects.

The Advisory Committee of the Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities invites applications for Research Residencies for PhD students in the earlier stages of their dissertations. Projects, which may be interdisciplinary, may focus on art and architectural history, music history, archeology, or related fields, from antiquity to the present. All projects must address the cultural histories of Naples as a center of exchange, encounter, and transformation, while making meaningful use of research materials in Naples and southern Italy including artworks, sites, archives, and libraries.

This year, Residencies will run for 9 months (2 September 2019 – 29 May 2020). Residents will be awarded free lodging and work space at La Capraia and, thanks to the logistical support of the Amici di Capodimonte, a modest award of 5,200 EUR to help defray the cost of living during the nine-month period. Residents will be granted privileged access to collections and research resources at the Capodimonte, and access to other sites, collections, and research materials will be arranged as needed. Residents will be responsible for obtaining appropriate visas (the Center will provide official letters of support) and for providing proof of health insurance. During their time in Naples, Residents are expected to share their research in a public lecture, gallery talk, or site visit, to participate fully in the Center’s organized activities, and before the end of the residency period to submit a written report on their progress.

We welcome applications from scholars of any nationality. Applicants are invited to submit a CV, a letter of intent, and a proposal of 1,000–1,500 words that outlines the research project and the resources that will be used in Naples. Materials should be sent in a single PDF file to the Center’s Research Coordinator, Dott.ssa Francesca Santamaria (francesca.santamaria@utdallas.edu). In addition, applicants must invite three recommenders to send letters of support directly to the same email address. All materials, including letters of recommendation, are due by Friday, February 15, 2019.

Call for Papers | The Art of Ugliness, Graduate Symposium

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 28, 2018

From H-ArtHist:

The Art of Ugliness, 29th Annual Art History Association Graduate Symposium
Indiana University, Bloomington, 13 April 2019

Proposals due by 10 January 2019

Keynote address: “The Use Value of Ugliness” by Dr. Andrei Pop (Associate Professor, Committee on Social Thought, Art History, and the College, The University of Chicago) and Dr. Mechtild Widrich (Assistant Professor, Art History, Theory and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Is ugliness diametrically opposed to beauty? Or is ugliness simply another aspect of the same coin systematically constructed and cultivated over centuries? While beauty has been fruitfully examined in fields ranging from philosophy to aesthetics and art history, less attention has been given to discourses concerning ugliness. We consider it imperative to reconsider ugliness at this moment to flesh out the ways in which discourses surrounding the ‘ugly’ shape ideas surrounding acceptability. Why do we define, name, or think of something or someone as ‘ugly’? Is it a psychological reaction to what we perceive as gross or disgusting? Does it violate morality? The Art of Ugliness will explore the complex social, cultural, and political aspects embedded within notions of ugliness as well as the aesthetic and philosophical implications of ‘the ugly’.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Changing perceptions of the nude
• The geography of decay- the ruinous landscape
• Disease and the body
• Xenophobia
• Class and the representation of the profane and abject
• Ugliness and (pseudo)scientific visual culture: phrenology, physiognomy
• Technology and the body
• Evolutionary Theories and Aesthetics
• Relationships to the ‘exotic’/ ‘other’
• The Grotesque; the monstrous; the strange

We invite papers that address ideas of ugliness and aesthetics and greatly encourage the submission of papers engaging objects from a broad variety of periods, geographies, and social groups. Paper sessions, followed by a panel response and discussion, will occur on Saturday, April 13th followed by the keynote address. Current graduate students in art history and related disciplines are invited to submit an abstract (maximum 300 words) for a twenty-minute presentation and CV to ahasympo@gmail.com by January 10th, 2019. Honoraria will be awarded to all presenters who attend from outside Bloomington.

Call for Papers | Built Environments and Performances of Power

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on July 2, 2018

From H-ArtHist:

Built Environments and Performances of Power
44th Annual Cleveland Symposium
Cleveland Museum of Art, 26 October 2018

Proposals due by 15 July 2018

The Art History Department at Case Western Reserve University invites graduate students to submit abstracts for its 2018 Annual Symposium Built Environments and Performances of Power. We welcome innovative research papers that engage with the concept of built environments and their performative spaces, both within and without.

Architecture creates narratives, while simultaneously shaping the identities of builders and users. Monumental architecture conveys stability, which allows its patrons to emphasize authority. At the same time, occupants transform spaces through their physical presence and social dynamics. How do we engage with architectural locations and the objects found within them? How do patronage, artistic intent, and pre-existing power structures complicate the ways in which audiences connect with their environments? How does social performance vary within constructed spaces? How can architecture—and the spatial distribution of artifacts within it—complicate ideas of centrality and periphery?

Presentations may explore aspects of this theme across any time period, medium, or geographical region. Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Social performance and movement within built environments
• Material spatiality
• Constructed spaces and ideas of comportment
• Interactions between loci memoriae, geography, and architecture
• Space as experienced by architects, engineers, institutions, and audiences
• Viewership, liminal spaces, or construction of memory within museums
• Reconstruction of space through (re)moveable objects and their functions
• Reception within a built environment
• Theatricality and performance

Current graduate students and recent graduates in art history and related disciplines are invited to submit a 350-word abstract and a CV for consideration to clevelandsymposium@gmail.com by the extended deadline of July 15, 2018. Selected participants will be notified by the end of July. Paper presentations will be 20 minutes in length. Please direct all questions to Angelica Verduci and Jacob Emmett at clevelandsymposium@gmail.com. The three most successful papers will be awarded prizes.

2016 Dissertation Listings from CAA

Posted in graduate students by Editor on June 27, 2018

My apologies for not posting this much sooner (the listings used to come out in August, and I wasn’t looking for them in December). CH

From caa.news (11 December 2017) . . .

Once a year, each institution granting the PhD in art history and/or visual studies submits dissertation titles to CAA for publication. caa.reviews has now published the authors and titles of doctoral dissertations in art history and visual studies—both completed and in progress—from American and Canadian institutions for calendar year 2016. You can browse by listing date or by subject matter. Each entry identifies the student’s name, dissertation title, school, and advisor.

The index for 2016 lists four ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations completed:

• Joshua D. Hainy, “John Flaxman: Beyond the Line” (Iowa, D. Johnson)

• Stephanie O’Rourke, “Bodies of Knowledge: Fuseli and Girodet at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century” (Columbia, J. Crary)

• Amanda K. Strasik, “Reconceiving Childhood: Women and Children in French Art, 1750–1814” (Iowa, D. Johnson)

• Aaron Wile, “Painting, Authority, and Experience at the Twilight of the Grand Siècle, 1688–1721” (Harvard, E. Lajer-Burcharth)

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and thirty-six ‘eighteenth-century art’ dissertations in progress, including:

• Daniella Berman, “Aesthetics of Contingency: History and the Unfinished Paintings of the French Revolution” (IFA/NYU, T. Crow)

• Christine Brandner, “Addressing another Body in Jean-Etienne Liotard’s Portraiture” (Yale, N. Suthor)

• Alexandra Cardon, “Circa 1700: Royal Retreats, Academic Unrest and the Roots of Rococo” (CUNY, J. Sund)

• Alicia Caticha, “Étienne-Maurice Falconet and the Matter of Sculpture: Marble, Porcelain, and Sugar in Eighteenth-Century Paris” (Virginia, S. Betzer)

• Elizabeth Gebauer, “The Art of Speech: Flemish Baroque Pulpits, 1627–1794” (Princeton, T. DaCosta Kaufmann)

• Sandra Gomez Todo, “Abandoned Schools of Pleasure: Unmasking Gender and Identity in the Visual Culture of the Georgian Masquerade” (Iowa, D. Johnson)

• Christine Griffiths, “From Garden to Toilette: Cultivating Perfume in Early Modern England” (Bard Graduate Center, D. Krohn)

• Rachel Harmeyer, “After Angelica Kauffman” (Rice, L. Costello)

• Julia K. McHugh, “Dressing Andean Spaces: Textiles, Painting, and Architecture in the Colonial Imagination” (UCLA, C. Villaseñor-Black)

• Isabel Oleas-Mogollón, “Jesuit Missionary and Visionary Experiences in Quito: La Compañía Prophet Paintings” (Delaware, M. Domínguez Torres)

• Emily Spratt, “Byzantium not Forgotten: Constructing the Artistic and Cultural Legacy of an Empire between East and West in the Early Modern Period” (Princeton, P. Brown)

• Amy Torbert, “Dissolving the Bonds: Sayer & Bennett, Print Publishers in an Age of Revolution” (Delaware, W. Bellion)

• Linda Zajac, “Miniature Worlds of Age and Masculinity in the Eighteenth-Century English Domestic Interior” (University of Victoria, E. Campbell)

Graduate Student Workshop | Asian Aesthetics and American Art

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on May 12, 2018

From the University of Delaware:

International Graduate Student Workshop
Global Impact of Asian Aesthetics on American Art and Material Culture
The University of Delaware and Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library 11–12 October 2018

Proposals due by 8 June 2018

With the generous support of the Terra Foundation for American Art, the University of Delaware’s Department of Art History and the Winterthur Program of American Material Culture will host a two-day International Graduate Student workshop on October 11 and 12, 2018. This workshop is part of a series of events in October 2018 to launch the project In Search of Global Impact of Asian Aesthetics on American Art and Material Culture.

We invite graduate students from a variety of fields, from all regions of the world, to submit a short abstract of a dissertation in progress or a project that: 1) redefines the canon of art history, with a focus on the multidirectional impact of Asian aesthetics on American art and material culture, and/or 2) proposes new interpretations of the transcultural and transhistorical flow of aesthetics that not only redefine the geocultural boundaries of Asia and North America, but also rethink methodological formations of aesthetic emergence.

We strongly encourage proposals that consider the flow of global aesthetics beyond the circulation of objects, as well as those that examine ‘Asia’ and ‘North America’ as discursive structures or cultural constructs in connection with other world regions such as Africa, Europe, South America, among others. In sum: How do design ideas, patterns, and aesthetics travel across the globe, even when objects do not?

To apply, send a short abstract written in English (300–500 words) and a 2-page CV to global-aesthetics@udel.edu by 8 June 2018. Applicants will be notified of decisions by 8 July 2018. Successful applicants will be invited to submit a dissertation chapter or excerpt, or paper, (9000–10000 words), to be pre-circulated and read before the workshop.

Official respondents are: Partha Mitter (Sussex, emeritus), Dorothy Ko (Barnard/Columbia), Lee Glazer (Freer/Sackler Galleries), Marco Musillo (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz), with the Terra Foundation’s guest critics: Zhang Gan and Chen Anying (Academy of Arts and Design, Tsinghua, Beijing), in addition to the faculty workshop advisors from the Department of Art History and the Winterthur Program of the University of Delaware.

Lodging and meals are provided for invited participants throughout the workshop. Applicants seeking travel support should include in the application a letter demonstrating the need and a budget plan.

In addition to the Terra Foundation, we thank the following organizations for their support: The University of Delaware’s Office of Graduate and Professional Education and the Center for Material Culture Studies, with grants from the Unidel Foundation, and National Endowment for the Humanities.

Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship at The Met

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on February 26, 2018

The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2018–2020

Applications due by 9 March 2018

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is seeking eligible candidates for The Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Internship/Research Scholarship for 2018–2020, a two-year position funded jointly by The Decorative Arts Trust and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This partnership seeks to provide hands-on curatorial experience for students and young professionals interested in museum careers.

The Curatorial Intern/Research Scholar will participate in a range of curatorial activities in the American Wing of The Met over a two-year period, with their efforts divided primarily between an exhibition project and permanent-collection work. The majority of the time will be devoted to myriad aspects of developing the exhibition, Stories in Clay: Stoneware from Edgefield District, South Carolina, currently scheduled to open at The Met in the fall of 2020. The intern/research scholar will be involved with researching objects, including provenance and methods of production; organizing loan paperwork as well as conservation examinations and photography of exhibition objects; developing and maintaining exhibition files; and participating in catalogue production and label writing. The individual will also participate in other permanent-collection curatorial tasks, including assisting with acquisitions and deaccessions as well as collection management.

Eligible candidates will have an M.A. degree in a field related to Decorative Arts, American Art, and/or Museum Studies, or comparable experience. The ideal candidate will have strong research and writing skills, a familiarity with digital resources and research platforms, and strong organizational skills. A proficiency with Microsoft Office is required and familiarity with TMS database recommended.

The Internship/Research Scholarship stipend for the 2-year period will be $35,000/year with an additional stipend of $2,500 for research, educational, and professional development programs. The 2-year position will ideally begin in September 2018. The deadline for all applications is March 9, 2018. Interested applicants should submit their resume, a statement of interest, and a writing sample of no more than 1000 words to: Marcie Karp, Senior Managing Educator, Academic and Professional Programs, at Academic.Programs@metmuseum.org.

Call for Papers | Sequitur, Issue 4 (Spring 2018): Extra

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on January 22, 2018

Sequitur 4.2 (Spring 2018): Extra
Submissions and Proposals due by 12 February 2018

The editors of Sequitur, a graduate student journal published by the Department of History of Art & Architecture at Boston University, invite current graduate students in art history, architecture, fine arts, and related fields to submit content on the theme of Extra for the Spring 2018 issue.

The concept of Extra can positively or negatively imply an unexpected leftover surprise or the added necessary ingredient after a deadline, limit, quality, or quantity has been reached. In the context of art making, the extra, the extraneous, and the accessory can provide much-needed solutions, present unanticipated problems, or symbolize intentional gestures meant to charm, endear, appease, or potentially destroy. As a frame for art historical inquiry, lastly, the concept of ‘extra’ might shed light on the eccentricities of artists, architects, subjects, patrons, collectors, or institutions—whether reflected in the style and content of art and architecture or their display and reception.

Possible subjects may include (but are not limited to): architectural additions; eccentric subject matter or makers; modifications to structures or works of art; accessories in fashion and design; outsider art, the avant-garde; the cult of personality; the additive, the accumulative, augmentation, the overdone, and the sensational; the sequential and/ or its disruption; and temporality studies. We welcome submissions addressing art, architecture, visual culture, or material culture from all time periods (ancient to contemporary) and geographical areas (including Asia, the Americas, and Africa). We encourage submissions that take advantage of the online format of the journal. Previous issues can be found here.

Founded in 2014, SEQUITUR is an online biannual scholarly journal dedicated to addressing events, issues, and personalities in art and architectural history. SEQUITUR engages with and expands current conversations in the field by promoting the perspectives of graduate students from around the world. It seeks to contribute to existing scholarship by focusing on valuable but oft-overlooked parts of art and architectural history.

We invite full submissions for the following pieces:
• Featured essays (1500 words) — Essays must be submitted in full by the deadline below to be considered for publication. Content is open and at the discretion of the author, but should present original material that is suitable to the stipulated word limit. Please adhere to the formatting guidelines available here.
• Visual essays — An opportunity for M.Arch. or M.F.A. students to showcase a selection of original work. The work must be reproducible in a digital format. Submissions should include jpegs of up to ten works, and must be prefaced by an introduction or artist’s statement of 250 words or less. All images must be captioned and should be at least 500 DPI.

We invite proposals (200 words max) for the following pieces :
• Exhibition reviews (500 words) — Exhibitions currently on display or very recently closed are especially sought.
• Book or exhibition catalogue reviews (500 words) — Reviews of recently published books and catalogues are especially sought.
• Interviews (750 words) — Preference may be given to those who can provide audio or video recordings of the interview.
• Field reports/Research spotlights (500 words) — This is an opportunity for students conducting research to summarize and share their findings and experiences in a more casual format than a formal paper.

All submissions and proposals are due February 12.
• Please direct all materials to sequitur@bu.edu.
• Text must be in the form of a Word document, and images should be sent as jpeg files.
• Please provide a recent CV.
• Please include ‘SEQUITUR Spring 2018’ and type of submission/proposal in the subject line, and your name, institution and program, year in program, and contact information in the body of the email.

Authors will be notified of the acceptance of their submission or proposal no later than February 23 for May 1 publication. Please note that authors are responsible for obtaining all image copyright releases prior to publication. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the SEQUITUR editors at sequitur@bu.edu. We look forward to receiving your proposals.

The SEQUITUR Editorial Team
Joseph, Alison, Kimber, Lauren, & Kelsey

PhD Research Placements at the British Library

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on January 17, 2018

From the BL:

William Blake at the British Library: PhD Research Placement
3 months during the period from June until December 2018

Applications due by 19 February 2018

PhD students are invited to apply to undertake one of our forthcoming research placements. These are specially-selected projects that have been developed by the Library to support current doctoral researchers to develop and apply transferrable skills and expertise. Amongst the opportunities being offered in the current Call is a placement on William Blake, focused on the Library’s large collection of prints by Blake. Further details and profiles for each of the other placements are available here.

A PhD research placement at the British Library provides the chance to experience research in a different environment to that of a university, to engage with a range of research users and audiences, to gain insights into different potential postdoctoral career paths, and to make a tangible contribution to the purposes and programmes of a national library and major cultural organisation. A broad range of research placement opportunities have been identified by the Library for 2018–19.

To Apply

Application Guidelines and the application form are available here. Please refer to the guidelines and email the completed application form and a CV to Research.Development@bl.uk. Please note that all applications must be approved by the applicant’s PhD supervisor and Graduate Tutor (or equivalent senior academic manager). The application deadline is 4pm on 19 February 2018.

Eligibility

This scheme is open to all PhD students, as long as they have the support of their PhD supervisor and their Graduate Tutor (or equivalent). International students are eligible if they have the right to study in the UK.

Funding

The research placements offered through the scheme are opportunities for current PhD students to apply and enhance research skills and expertise outside of Higher Education as part of their wider research training and professional development. They are training and development opportunities to be undertaken within this specific context—and are therefore different to the paid internships or other fixed-term posts that the Library may occasionally make available. See the Application Guidelines for further details and background. Please note that—unlike for an internship or a fixed-term post—the British Library is unable to provide stipends or payment to PhD placement students. It is therefore essential that applicants to the placement scheme obtain the support of their PhD supervisor and Graduate Tutor (or someone in an equivalent senior academic management role) in advance and that, as part of their process, they consult their HEI to ascertain what funding is available to support them. To support self-funded and part-time students, most placements can be done on a part-time basis, with some remote working also sometimes possible—see the individual projects for details.

Student Workshop | Questions of Technique in Art History

Posted in graduate students, opportunities by Editor on December 2, 2017

From H-ArtHist:

Questions of Technique in Art History
International Student Workshop of the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris and the École du Louvre in Paris, 18–24 March 2018

Applications due by 8 January 2018

For some time now and with few exceptions, instruction in artistic materials and techniques has ceased to be an integral part of an art historian’s education. Nevertheless, throughout one’s research in this discipline, one is constantly confronted with the assumption that one has already acquired knowledge on everything from painting materials to reproductive processes, drawing practices, paper, pigment, and bronze casting, to cite only some of the most familiar examples.

In response to this lack, the Deutsche Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris (DFK), in partnership with the École du Louvre, is offering a week-long workshop for art history students that focuses on artisanal, technical, and restorative techniques, and on how these issues relate to the history of artistic education in France. Study days presided over by international specialists will be punctuated by student presentations, and by site visits to artists’ ateliers at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris (ENSBA), to the Musée Bourdelle, and to the Centre de restauration des musées de France (C2RMF), among other locations. There will also by hands-on opportunities for exploring this subject, including an etching and lithography workshop, and a drawing session with an artist, a professor of the ENSBA.

Participation will be limited to ten master’s and doctoral students from an international pool of applicants. All participants are required to have a professional proficiency in the French language and will be asked to give a presentation whose theme will be assigned in advance.

Travel and lodging expenses for students residing outside of Paris will be covered with a grant of up to 300 Euros with the presentation of receipts. Participants will need to cover their meal expenses. Arrival is expected on March 18th, departure day will be Saturday March 24th.

Application documents must include a letter of motivation (not to exceed 2 pages), a recommendation letter from a professor, and a CV indicating prior academic achievements. There is no guarantee of admission. To be considered, please send your documents to Dr. Julia Drost and Prof. Dr. François-René Martin (ateliersderecherche@dfk-paris.org) with the subject line “Questions de techniques en histoire de l’art / Techniken und Materialien in der Kunstgeschichte” by January 8th, 2018.

PhD Studentship | 18th-Century British Women Printmakers

Posted in graduate students by Editor on May 5, 2017

From Birkbeck College:

PhD Studentship | Making an Impression: British Women Printmakers in the Eighteenth Century
V&A / Birkbeck College, University of London, starting October 2017

Applications due by 23 May 2017

Angelica Kauffman, Juno, etching, London, 1770 (London: V&A, E.350-1890).

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD studentship researching the role, status and output of amateur and professional women printmakers in Britain during the long eighteenth century, drawing on the Victoria & Albert Museum’s strong collections of work by women printmakers of this period. The project will reconstruct and investigate the work of a number of women artists who have long been overlooked, thereby making a significant contribution to the history of art, design and the print.

This project will be supervised by Dr Kate Retford, Senior Lecturer in History of Art (Birkbeck College, University of London), who specialises in eighteenth-century British art, particularly gender and portraiture, and Dr Sarah Grant, Curator of Prints at the V&A, whose research interests encompass eighteenth-century prints, women artists, and female patronage.
Deadline: 5pm, Tuesday, 23 May 2017
More information is available here»

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