Enfilade

Launch of Royalpalaces.com

Posted in resources by Editor on December 15, 2018


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From The Society of Antiquaries of London Online Newsletter (Salon) issue 419 (11 December 2018) . . .

Royalpalaces.com

Simon Thurley FSA, one-time Curator of Historic Royal Palaces (1989–97) and Chief Executive of English Heritage (2002–15) . . . has launched Royalpalaces.com, which he describes as

“an encyclopaedic website about British royal residences . . . There is currently nowhere online that people can go to find authoritative information about royal residences from the Saxons to the present, or to find out quickly and easily about royal domestic architectural patronage. RoyalPalaces.com will eventually have nearly 150 place entries covering royal residences from Abingdon to York; most entries have an image and a plan in addition to explanatory text. The website has launched with the first 50 entries. There will also be nearly 30 monarch entries for the greatest British royal architectural patrons—the website launches with ten, including one for Queen Elizabeth II. There will also be podcasts covering various thematic issues. The first podcast deals with the tricky issue of ‘what is a palace?’—and the answer is not ‘a royal residence’. Hopefully of use to the more scholarly-minded will be the bibliographies attached to each entry. All contributions or omissions in these will be gratefully received as will notification of errors spotted.”

Gale Publishes Papers of the Exiled Stuart Kings

Posted in resources by Editor on November 13, 2018

A letter written in cipher, with the decoded translation beneath each line, detailing Swedish support for the planned Jacobite uprising of 1717
(Royal Archives / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018)

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Another compelling archived digitized, another reason scholars will need access to well-funded libraries; from the press release via Art Daily:

A major new digitisation programme will provide unparalleled insight into the social, military, and personal worlds of the exiled Stuart dynasty and their Jacobite followers, as they fought to regain the thrones of Scotland, England, and Ireland between the late 17th and early 19th centuries. The Stuart and Cumberland Papers project makes accessible online a total of 245,000 documents from the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. The project has been undertaken in partnership with Gale, a Cengage Company, a leading provider of educational technology for libraries. Digitised over a period of 18 months, the papers are now available as part of Gale’s State Papers Online programme and can be acquired by academic institutions and libraries worldwide to offer researchers and students a unique window into this turbulent period of European history.

The Stuart claimants to the throne were the descendants of James II (James VII of Scotland), who was forced from the throne and replaced by his Protestant daughter Mary II and her husband William of Orange during the Glorious Revolution of 1688. From then until the death of the last Stuart heir in 1807, the Stuarts were exiles in Europe, at the head of a complex network of Jacobite supporters at home and abroad.

The Stuart Papers bring together the private and diplomatic correspondence of James II; his son, James Francis Edward Stuart, nicknamed the Old Pretender; and his grandson, Charles Edward Stuart, better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie; as well as telling the story of their wives and mistresses, loyal followers, courtiers, and spies. A significant proportion of the papers are wholly or partly in cipher, often with the translation written above each line.

In July 1745, Bonnie Prince Charlie sailed from France to Scotland with plans to raise a Jacobite army against the Hanoverians and regain the throne for his father. By April 1746, the two sides were preparing to meet at Culloden Moor. A memorandum in the Stuart Papers written by General Lord George Murray details the combat orders issued to the exhausted Jacobite troops: “It is required & expected that each indeviduall in the Armie as well officer as Souldier keeps their posts that shall be alotted to them, & if any man turn his back to Runaway the nixt behind such man is to shoot him. No body on Pain of Death to Strip the slain or Plunder till the Batle be over. The Highlanders all to be in Kilts, & no body to throw away their Guns; by HRH Command.”

The Jacobites suffered a catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Culloden, and Bonnie Prince Charlie fled to France. In a letter dated 28 April 1746, the Prince wrote to his Scottish Chiefs, justifying his reasons for leaving Scotland and asking them to conceal his departure for as long as possible. He wrote, “When I came into this Country, it was my only view to do all in my power for your good and safety, This I will allways do as long as life is in me, But alas! I see with grief, I can at present do little for you on this side the water, for the only thing that can now be done, is to defend your selves, ‘till the French assist you…”

Two months later, in one of the most personal letters to be found in the Stuart Papers, Charles’s father, James Francis Edward, wrote to him to discuss the failure of the 1745–46 rebellion. The Prince urged his son: “Do not for Gods sake drive things too far, but think of your own safety, on which so much depends; Tho’ your Enterprize should miscarry, the honor you have gaind by it will always stick by you, it will make you be respected & considerd abroad.” While the majority of the letter was dictated by the Prince to his Secretary, the last sentence was added in the Prince’s own handwriting: “Adieu my dearest Child I tenderly embrace you & am all yours once more God bless and protect you, James R.”

Digitised alongside the Stuart Papers are those of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, the second surviving son of George II, who was a key figure in the Hanoverian monarchy and Captain General of the British Army between 1745 and 1757. In 1746, he was also appointed Ranger of Windsor Great Park, a role he retained until his death in 1765. By making available these two distinct but historically related collections, The Stuart and Cumberland Papers project offers unique perspectives into both the Jacobite risings and the methods used by the ruling Hanoverian monarchy to suppress them.

An account by Lord Charles Cathcart, Aide-de-Camp to the Duke of Cumberland, describes the British victory at the Battle of Culloden, and includes sketches showing the order of the battle. He describes how the Hanoverian forces, “after leaving 1,000 dead” on the battlefield, pursued the fleeing Jacobites and “cut 1,000 to pieces,” as well as taking several hundreds of French prisoners.

Oliver Urquhart Irvine, The Librarian & Deputy Keeper of The Queen’s Archives, said, “The Stuart and Cumberland Papers project forms part of our ongoing commitment to make the historic treasures of the Royal Archives as widely accessible as possible through digital technology. We are grateful to our partners at Gale for enabling us to make this invaluable resource available online, giving students and scholars from around the world the opportunity to explore these compelling original documents first-hand.”

Seth Cayley, Vice President, Gale Primary Sources, said, “The history of the exiled Stuart Court, with all of its intrigues, larger-than-life personalities and thwarted ambition, is revealed in intricate detail through these documents and papers of court life and politics. The digital availability of the Stuart and Cumberland Papers in State Papers Online will enrich 18th-century studies research around the world. Gale would like to thank the Royal Archives for collaborating on this milestone project.”

New Publication | The RA Summer Exhibition: A Chronicle, 1769–2018

Posted in books, resources by Editor on June 16, 2018

Readers will likely have already heard about this amazing publication from the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, but I’m glad to join the chorus of fans! (Disclosure: I provided entries for 1823 and 1846). If you have trouble navigating with Firefox, try another browser (it works beautifully on an iPhone). The brief essays are wide-ranging and full of surprises. In addition, it’s difficult to overestimate the value of freely available digital, searchable versions of the catalogues for all 250 years. There must also be wonderful teaching possibilities! CH

From the Mellon Centre:

Hallett, Mark, Sarah Victoria Turner, Jessica Feather, Baillie Card, Tom Scutt, and Maisoon Rehani, eds., The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition: A Chronicle, 1769–2018 (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2018), https://www.chronicle250.com.

A major new, free to access digital publication reveals the hidden stories from the entwined histories of British art and the Royal Academy, marking the 250th anniversary of the world’s longest-running annual display of contemporary art.

Since 1769, more than 40,000 contemporary artists have shown more than 300,000 works at the Royal Academy of Arts’ Summer Exhibition. In time for this year’s show (opening on 12 June), the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art has released The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition: A Chronicle, 1769–2018. This open access digital publication brings together artwork, stories, and data spanning 250 years of the exhibition’s history.

Lively year-by-year essays examining key artists, artworks, and events from each exhibition are accompanied by a complete set of digitised and searchable catalogues chronicling the history of the annual event from 1769 to the present day. It contains 250 contributions from over 90 experts—including artists, critics, curators, and art historians—and is intended to be a permanent research resource for anyone interested the history of British art.

The online publication complements the exhibition The Great Spectacle: 250 Years of the Summer Exhibition, on view at the Royal Academy from 12 June until August 19.

Workshop | Digital Mapping

Posted in lectures (to attend), resources by Editor on June 12, 2018

From Eventbrite:

Hannah Williams and Chris Sparks, Digital Mapping: Introductory Workshop
Queen Mary University of London, 2–6pm, 12 July 2018

Digital mapping technologies have led to exciting recent shifts in humanities research. Rather than treating maps as mere illustrations, historians and art historians are making spatial analysis and cartographic visualisations fundamental to their inquiries and yielding fascinating insights as a result.

Yet humanities researchers often lack technical training and can be daunted by the logistics of experimenting with digital methods. This Introductory Digital Mapping Workshop aims to provide basic skills for humanities researchers who want to get started with digital mapping. In an informal setting, we will introduce some key concepts and useful resources, and run two practical sessions to develop valuable skills for undertaking your own mapping project. By the end of the day, you will have georeferenced a historical map, started devising a project brief, and prototyped a web app.

Following the workshop, we invite you to join us for the website launch of Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World, a digital mapping project by Hannah Williams and Chris Sparks, funded by The Leverhulme Trust and supported by Queen Mary University of London.

This workshop is aimed especially at early career researchers, postdocs, and PhD students in humanities disciplines, but it is open to researchers at any level. Places for the workshop are limited. If after booking you are unable to attend, please let us know so that your place can be given to someone else. After booking your place at the workshop, please email the organisers with a brief description of your research interests in digital mapping and, if applicable, some of the sources you might be using. This is only for our information in planning the workshop and will not be distributed.

Website Launch – Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World
Queen Mary University of London, 12 July 2018

Join us to celebrate the launch of Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World, a digital mapping project by Hannah Williams and Chris Sparks, funded by The Leverhulme Trust and supported by Queen Mary University of London. Find out more about the project with a website demo and informal discussion. Drinks and snacks will be served.

These events have been made possible with support from The Leverhulme Trust.

Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World

Posted in resources by Editor on April 3, 2018

Results for a search for ‘Hubert Robert’; screen shot from Hannah Williams and Chris Sparks, Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World, www.artistsinparis.org (accessed 2 April 2018). As noted in the FAQs for the site, “there are 10,915 addresses in the database,” with coverage for “a total of 471 artists,” that is, for “every artist admitted to the Academy between 1675 and 1793.” Useful site details are available with the ‘settings’ tab.

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From the ‘About’ page of Artists in Paris:

Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World

Artists in Paris is an open-access digital art history project funded by The Leverhulme Trust and supported by Queen Mary University of London. The Principal Investigator of the project is Dr Hannah Williams. The website was designed and built by Dr Chris Sparks.

Introduction

Paris is a city renowned for its artistic communities. Neighbourhoods like Montmartre and Montparnasse in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are familiar spaces of artistic activity and sociability. But when it comes to earlier generations of artists, we know strikingly little about how they inhabited the city.

Where did the artists of eighteenth-century Paris live? Which artists were neighbours? What sub-communities formed within the city? Which neighbourhoods formed the cultural geography of the eighteenth-century art world? And did that geography change over the course of the century?

This website provides answers to these tantalising questions about the geography and demography of the Paris art world in the eighteenth century. Based on original archival research retrieving the addresses of hundreds of artists’ homes and studios, this website uses digital mapping technologies to locate those spaces on georeferenced historical maps, making them available for visitors to explore.

Significance

Artists in Paris is the first project to map comprehensively where artistic communities developed in the eighteenth-century city and offers rich scope for subsequent investigations into how these communities worked and the impact they had on art practice in the period. Yielding crucial new information and harnessing the exciting possibilities of digital humanities for art-historical research, this website is intended as a valuable resource for anyone studying or researching French art, or for anyone with an interest in the history of Paris.

With its two modes—Year and Artist—the website accommodates searches either by date or by person. For instance, visitors can explore where every artist was living at certain moments in time, or they can select individual artists and explore all the addresses lived at across their careers. Designed to be simultaneously inviting and informative, these interactive data-enriched maps answer many questions about the Paris art world. But they are also intended as an empirical base upon which to pose new kinds of inquiries, inspiring continued explorations into networks of artistic sociability, the role of the city in art production, the geography of the art world, and urban experience more generally.

Credits & Acknowledgements

Artists in Paris has been funded through a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Research Fellowship, awarded to Hannah Williams and held at Queen Mary University of London (2015–2018). Additional support for the project has been provided by Queen Mary University of London. Preliminary stages of the research were funded by a grant from the University of Oxford’s John Fell Fund, awarded to Hannah Williams, and undertaken at the University of Oxford (2013–2015).

Thanks are due to the many people who offered advice and suggestions, attended research seminars, workshops, and usability testing sessions, and provided feedback and encouragement throughout the project. Among the many are Laura Auricchio, Robin Carlyle, Craig Clunas, Rebecca Emmett, Noémie Étienne, Keren Hammerschlag, Colin Jones, Meredith Martin, Gay McAuley, Chris Moffatt, David Pullins, Helen Stark, Chloe Ward, Sam Williams, Emma Yates, the community of developers on Stack Overflow, students at Queen Mary University of London and the University of London in Paris, and attendees of presentations at the Institute of Historical Research in London, the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte in Paris, University of Birmingham, University of St Andrews, and the National Gallery of Art in Canberra.

Special thanks are due to Dr Mia Ridge (British Library) for advice and technical support from the project’s inception and throughout its development.

The website logo and colour-design are by Jason Varone.

This website was built using OpenLayers and Bootstrap. It also makes use of other great libraries including Handelbars. The historical maps were georeferenced using Map Warper. The greyscale contemporary map layer is by Stamen Design, licensed under CC BY 3.0. Map data is by OpenStreetMap under ODbL. The digitized historical maps of Paris have been sourced from Wikimedia Commons.

Redesigned ‘Dictionary of Art Historians’ Unveiled

Posted in resources by Editor on March 27, 2018

As announced by the team behind the Dictionary of Art Historians (21 March 2018). . . And as noted toward the end of the announcement, the DAH continues to accept contributions, including new entries.

A thirty-year-old resource emerged today as a modern reference tool for art history. The Dictionary of Art Historians announces a new interface, data structure, and user options, the product of a year-long redesign. The original tool, a website since 1996, was developed privately by Lee Sorensen, the art and visual studies librarian at Duke University. Duke’s Wired! Lab for digital art history & visual culture sponsored the project beginning in 2016. The new DAH offers searchable data on over 2400 art historians, museum directors, and art-writers of western art from all time periods. Over 200 academic websites have linked to the project; the tool has been called one of the core tools of art historiography and cited in books and journal articles.

Begun pre-internet in 1986 as a card file, the project addressed a lack of information on the intellectual heritage that art historians created or used in writing art histories. “Before the DAH, it was impossible to discover even simple things like an art historian’s scholarly reputation, his/her core writings or even under whom they studied,” Sorensen said. “These things are important when reading a text or trying to understand the errors of past research.”

“The project’s redesign recognizes twenty-first-century scholars’ need to access information in the DAH using multiple digital research methods,” said Hannah Jacobs, Wired!’s digital humanities specialist responsible for the redesign, “It redefines the project content as data that can be mined at both micro and macro levels. By standardizing the data and developing new ways to access the data, we are making methods such as text mining, data analysis, and data visualization possible for our audiences.”

The new Dictionary of Art Historians site will continue to be developed over the coming year. New features to be released include
• Additional filtering capabilities on the ‘Explore’ page
• Ability to export filtered entries in open data formats
• Additional resources for citation management
• New data fields
• New and updated entries

The Dictionary of Art Historians continues to accept contributions. Please submit feedback about the project, new entries, or edits to existing entries to contact@arthistorians.info.

Digital History | Fashion History Timeline

Posted in online learning, resources by internjmb on March 10, 2018

From the Fashion History Timeline, a project by FIT’s History of Art Department:

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The Fashion History Timeline is an open-access source for fashion history knowledge, featuring objects and artworks from over a hundred museums and libraries that span the globe. The Timeline website offers well-researched, accessibly written entries on specific artworks, garments and films for those interested in fashion and dress history. Started as a pilot project by Fashion Institute of Technology art history faculty and students in the Fall of 2015, the Timeline aims to be an important contribution to public knowledge of the history of fashion and to serve as a constantly growing and evolving resource not only for students and faculty, but also for the wider world of those interested in fashion and dress history–from the Renaissance scholar to the simply curious.

Exhibition | Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, resources by Editor on January 10, 2018

Now on view at the Mazarin Library (with the full press release available as a PDF file here)

Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières
Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, 20 October 2017 — 19 January 2018

L’Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (1751–1772), codirigée par Diderot, D’Alembert et Jaucourt, constitue la plus vaste entreprise éditoriale du 18e siècle, par le nombre des forces humaines mobilisées, l’étendue des savoirs convoqués, et son retentissement en Europe. La publication de cet « ouvrage immense et immortel » (Voltaire), dont la première édition rassemble 28 volumes, quelque 74 000 articles et près de 2 600 planches, s’étend sur plus de 25 ans. Autorisée par un privilège de librairie (1746), elle est censurée alors que deux tomes sont déjà imprimés (1752), puis tolérée (1753), à nouveau interdite et condamnée à la destruction (1759), et enfin poursuivie grâce à une permission tacite (1759–1772). Et, parce qu’elle constitue une entreprise commerciale à succès, elle connaît immédiatement réimpressions et contrefaçons.

Pour la première fois, une édition critique de l’Encyclopédie voit le jour. Réalisée au format numérique et menée de façon collaborative par plus de 120 chercheurs de tous horizons, elle vise l’annotation progressive des articles et des planches, en mobilisant l’ensemble des connaissances sur l’ouvrage. Soutenue par l’Académie des sciences, l’Édition Numérique Collaborative et CRitique de l’Encyclopédie (ENCCRE)1 s’appuie sur un exemplaire exceptionnel du premier tirage de la première édition, conservé par la Bibliothèque Mazarine qui en a fait l’acquisition au 18e siècle, volume après volume.

L’exposition met en relation cet exemplaire original et l’édition numérique. Elle montre ce que fut le travail de l’Encyclopédie au 18e siècle, et ce que représente son édition critique au 21e. De l’architecture complexe de l’ouvrage à son histoire éditoriale, on y découvre matériellement et numériquement l’intérieur de l’œuvre, ses enjeux et ce qui fut une de ses ambitions fondamentales : « changer la façon commune de penser ». (Diderot).

Organisation et commissariat
Alain Cernuschi (Université de Lausanne)
Alexandre Guilbaud (Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu) Marie Leca Tsiomis (Université Paris Ouest, Société Diderot) Irène Passeron (Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu)
Yann Sordet (Bibliothèque Mazarine)
Anne Weber (Bibliothèque Mazarine)

Alain Cernuschi, Alexandre Guilbaud, Marie Leca-Tsiomis, Irène Passeron, with Yann Sordet, preface by Cathérine Bréchignac, Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières (Paris: EDP Sciences, 2017), 120 pages, ISBN: 978  27598  21389, 15€.

The Launch of the King’s Friends Network

Posted in resources by Editor on December 4, 2017

From the Georgian Papers Programme:

10 November 2017 saw an important milestone in the evolution of the Georgian Papers Programme with the public launch of The King’s Friends network. The King’s Friends is a free-to-join international community of those whose work stands to benefit from the digitization of the Georgian papers in the Royal Archives, and who in turn can help make the project a success. We hope that a very wide range of researchers working on eighteenth-century or early nineteenth-century themes will join the King’s Friends network, and find it of use and interest in research not only on themes closely related to the history of the British monarchy and its jurisdictions, but to a whole range of topics from the histories of science, agriculture and medicine to the histories of gender and interpersonal relations, and the histories of art, collections, consumption, food and fashion, to mention just a few!

Click here to learn more and join the King’s Friends Network.

AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators

Posted in museums, resources by Editor on October 6, 2017

From the Association of Art Museum Curators:

AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators
Applications due by 20 October 2017

The AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators, made possible with major support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, is a two-year Program for three non-US based curators and three US Liaisons working on or having worked within exhibitions and projects that explore historic American Art (c. 1500–1980), including painting; sculpture; works on paper, including prints, drawing and photography; decorative arts; and excluding architecture; design; and performance. The Program offers numerous benefits for Awardees, including travel funding.

Through fostering international relationships between curators, the Program aims to not only provide opportunities for professional development and exchange, but also to expand and strengthen the international curatorial community and give primacy to the curatorial voice in the international dialogue between museum professionals.The Program will be an active part of building international partnerships, leading cross-border conversations, and spearheading international representation within AAMC’s membership & AAMC Foundation’s efforts.

Program Goals
• Form new international relationships and partnerships through the interaction of each International Awardee with their US Liaison and the larger AAMC community of members & supporters
• Provide opportunities for International Awardee to engage with US museum networks and professional development opportunities through AAMC membership benefits, including travel funding to the AAMC Annual Conference; Program-specific webinars and access to past AAMC webinars; AAMC Committee or Task Force participation; an Annual Alumni reception; visit to US Liaison’s institution, and more
• Foster awareness of the concerns and needs of curators working outside the US within AAMC’s membership and within the AAMC Foundation programming
• Establish a long lasting relationship between AAMC, AAMC Foundation, the International Awardees, and community of international scholars
• Bring an international voice to AAMC’s leadership through engagement with the organization’s donor groups and involvement on an AAMC Committee

Additional information, including details for International Curators and US Liaisons, is available here»