Enfilade

Humanities Commons

Posted in resources by Editor on May 29, 2017

For many of us, summer means catching up on one’s scholarly profiles: filing activity reports, updating CVs, reformatting personal websites, and uploading academic papers. Now you have a new set of options with a new platform: Humanities Commons, a nonprofit, open-access network, built with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

As described on the ‘About’ page for HC:

Humanities Commons was designed by scholarly societies in the humanities to serve the needs of humanists as they engage in teaching and research that benefit the larger community. Unlike other social and academic communities, Humanities Commons is open-access, open-source, and nonprofit. It is focused on providing a space to discuss, share, and store cutting-edge research and innovative pedagogy—not on generating profits from users’ intellectual and personal data.

The network also features an open-access repository, the Commons Open Repository Exchange. CORE allows users to preserve their research and increase its reach by sharing it across disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries. Developed in partnership with Columbia University’s Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, CORE is underwritten by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Office of Digital Humanities.

In December, Inside Higher Ed noted the launch of the beta version.

In a March posting for ACRLog, the blog of the Association of College & Research Libraries, Lily Troia interviewed Nicky Agate, Head of Digital Initiatives in the Office of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association. The posting provides a useful introduction to Humanities Commons and how it differs from commercial services such as Academia.edu.

CAA is one of four societies currently participating, and the hub, CAA Commons, is scheduled for release in the coming weeks (months?). In the meantime (and at least at this point, it’s not obvious what additional features might be available with CAA Commons), anyone is invited to register, establish a profile, create a website (in cooperation with WordPress), upload papers, and start setting up groups. Groups can be public, private, or hidden. More information is available from the Guides and FAQ sections.

Craig Hanson

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Digital Development Award for Art History Publishing

Posted in resources by Editor on May 11, 2017

From ARIAH:

ARIAH Digital Development Award for Art History Publishing
Proposals due by 1 June 2017

ARIAH (Association of Research Institutes in Art History) is offering a new award that contributes funding to the development of digital publications. This award is aimed at scholars seeking to take advantage of new possibilities offered by digital publishing platforms for presenting art historical research. It is also aimed at online publishers (broadly defined to include different kinds of online platforms that disseminate research, such as online journals, digital project spaces, and discrete parts of museum websites dedicated to scholarly content). The award is intended to help scholars move into the digital realm; to encourage innovative ideas in how digital publishing can support new modes and methods for disseminating art historical research; and to assist collaboration between authors and online publishers to enhance the digital presentation of research, which, it is hoped, will serve as future models for others and find broader applications in the field.

Scope of the Award
Applications are invited for projects up to the sum of $10,000. However, projects requiring smaller sums of funding of $5,000 or less are strongly encouraged. The award is intended as a subvention to assist with the development of digital tools, the creation of digital media, or enhancement of digital platforms that form a necessary part of a single discrete art historical essay, article, or project. The digital platform must already be in existence (i.e., the award is not for developing entirely new platforms or journals). The award will be offered on a two-year cycle.

Application Process
A completed application form and Letter of Intent and a completed application form must reach the committee by June 1st, 2017. The committee will select the most promising projects and invite full applications to be submitted by September 1st, 2017. Submit any queries and completed applications to ariahdigital@gmail.com. Application materials are available here.

The British Library Launches ‘Picturing Places’

Posted in resources by Editor on May 4, 2017

J. Mérigot after Louis Bélanger, View of the Bridge across the Rio Cobre near Spanish Town, Jamaica; etching, aquatint, hand colouring; published in London, 20 April 1800 (London: British Library, Maps K.Top.123.55.b). This sublime aquatint of the River Cobre in Jamaica is after a design by Louis Bélanger. It is part of a series of six. There is no record of Bélanger ever visiting Jamaica. It appears that he adapted his designs for this work and another view in the series from George Robertson’s paintings of the island, available in print from the 1770s (see BL Maps K.Top.123.54.f.). The image is included in Miles Ogborn’s article for Picturing Places: “Slavery, Freedom and the Jamaican Landscape.”

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Felicity Myrone of the British Library shares this exciting news:

The British Library is delighted to announce the launch of Picturing Places, a new free online resource which explores the Library’s extensive holdings of landscape imagery. The British Library’s huge collection of historic prints and drawings is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered. Picturing Places showcases works of art by well-known artists such as Thomas Gainsborough and J.M.W. Turner alongside images by a multitude of lesser-known figures. Only a few have ever been seen or published before.

Historically, the British Library’s prints and drawings have been overlooked by scholars. This is the first time that a large and important body of such materials from the Library are being brought to light. While landscape images have often been treated as accurate records of place, this website reveals the many different stories involved—about travel and empire, science and exploration, the imagination, history, and observation.

As well as over 500 newly-digitised works of art from the collection, this growing site will feature over 100 articles by both emerging and established scholars from many disciplines. Part of the British Library’s ongoing Transforming Topography research project, films from the Library’s 2016 conference exploring the depiction of place are also accessible, providing revelatory insights about the history of landscape imagery.

Additional information is available here»

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The British Library Set To Expand

Posted in resources by Editor on April 19, 2017

British Library at St Pancras site and surroundings, including (center) the British Library, (right) St Pancras Station, and (top) the Francis Crick Institute (Photo by Ian Hay).

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Press release (11 April 2017) from the BL:

The British Library has selected a consortium led by property developer Stanhope, working with architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, as preferred partner for a project to develop a 2.8 acre site to the north of its Grade I Listed building at St Pancras in London as a major new centre for commerce, knowledge, and research.

At the heart of the development will be 100,000 sq ft of new British Library spaces for learning, exhibitions, and public use, including a new northern entrance and a bespoke headquarters for the Alan Turing Institute, the national centre for data science research. The development will also include new commercial space for organisations and companies that wish to be located at the heart of London’s Knowledge Quarter, close to the Francis Crick Institute and the other knowledge-based companies, research organisations, amenities, and transport links located at King’s Cross and St Pancras.

The Stanhope consortium was appointed following a Competitive Dialogue procurement process that began in late 2015. Stanhope have 30 years’ experience of developing complex central London projects, including Broadgate, Paternoster Square, and the Tate Modern Switch House building. Stanhope are backed by strong financial partners and current projects include the regeneration of Television Centre, White City. Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners are well-known for buildings such as the Grade I Listed Lloyds Building and the recent British Museum extension.

Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Karen Bradley said: “The British Library is one of our finest cultural institutions, housing an unparalleled collection of knowledge. This innovative project will increase access to the Library’s first-class collections, providing new exhibition spaces, learning opportunities, and facilities for visitors from Britain and around the world to enjoy. It is a significant commitment to digital research and data science, and I am pleased the expansion will provide a bespoke headquarters for the Alan Turing Institute.”

Universities and Science Minister Jo Johnson said: “This new development alongside the Francis Crick Institute will be another gem in the crown of London’s Knowledge Quarter and an ideal location for commercial and life-sciences investment in an area already synonymous with pioneering thinking and Britain’s leadership in research. Our Industrial Strategy will support the development of projects like this to ensure the UK has the environment and skills we need to maintain our position at the forefront of innovation.”

Deputy Mayor for Business, Greater London Authority, Rajesh Agrawal, said: “This is another exciting development for London’s flourishing Knowledge Quarter, our world-leading life sciences sector and our rapidly growing reputation for data science. It is a huge vote of confidence in the capital post-Brexit. London is one of the greatest scientific cities on the planet. We are internationally renowned as a bastion of research and innovation and one of the most attractive places in the world for life and data science companies to do business. This new investment, just a stone’s throw from the Francis Crick Institute, is another huge boost to London’s role as a global capital of science and innovation. As well as leading to world-changing discoveries, products, and services, it will deliver new jobs and demonstrate that London is open to the world’s greatest scientific minds.”

The development project is a key part of the British Library’s Living Knowledge vision to become ever more open, creative, and innovative in the delivery of its purposes. The objectives of this development include:
• More exhibition spaces, increasing public access to the Library’s vast world-class collections
• New facilities for learners of all ages, with expanded programmes for schools, colleges, families, adult learners, and local communities
• Improved public areas and accessibility, with more places to sit and study
• An enhanced offering for business users, building on the success of the Library’s Business & IP Centre
• A new northern entrance close to the Francis Crick Institute and the main St Pancras Station concourse
• A permanent home for the Alan Turing Institute, the UK national centre for data science
• Flexible accommodation for third-party companies, institutions, and research organisations seeking to work at the heart of the Knowledge Quarter
• Environmental improvements including enhanced East-West connectivity for local people walking between Somers Town and St Pancras

HM Treasury and the Library’s sponsor department, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport have approved the Full Business Case for the project. The Development Agreement with Stanhope is to be finalised this summer, with the design and planning process—including close working with Camden Council, local communities and other neighbours and stakeholders, and an agreed solution to accommodating Crossrail 2 requirements into the development—taking place over the next eighteen months.

Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library, said: “We are delighted to have secured such high-calibre partners to help realise our vision of the British Library’s London campus as a truly open, creative centre for knowledge. Sir Colin St John Wilson’s Grade I Listed building was one of the great public projects of the last century, and this new partnership will help us to preserve and respect its unique character while creating much-needed extra space both for our growing public audiences and the dynamic research communities in London’s Knowledge Quarter.”

Save

Save

Save

Save

Website of The Carl Heinrich von Heineken Society

Posted in resources by Editor on March 5, 2017

allegorie-gw-i-ii-iii-1020x350

Many readers are likely to find the the Society and its website (in German, English, and French) of interest:

cropped-icon-01The Carl Heinrich von Heineken Society (Die Carl Heinrich von Heineken Gesellschaft) was established in 2016 and aims to explore the work and life of Carl Heinrich von Heineken (1707–1791), the founder of modern print studies. Building on Heineken’s Idée générale (the founding manifesto of all modern print rooms written in exile in Altdöbern), the Society considers previously unevaluated sources and sheds new light on the historic significance of the universal scholar for the Age of Enlightenment in the second half of the eighteenth century.

The Society also places particular emphasis on researching the history of Altdöbern Palace, including the sumptuous gardens co-designed by Heineken. The scholarly findings are frequently showcased in publications, public events, lectures, and exhibitions.

An art historical reference library is also being assembled, together with an extensive collection of prints which encompasses all engravings published by Heineken during his lifetime after artworks in the Dresden Picture Gallery and the painting collection of Count Brühl. These resources are available to all parties interested in art and culture upon request.

Save

Robert Jacob Gordon’s Drawings and Papers Now Available Online

Posted in online learning, resources by Editor on February 17, 2017

rp-t-1914-17-3-a-1

Attributed to Robert Jacob Gordon, Upper (Northern) Half of Gordon’s ‘Great Map of Southern Africa, ca. 1786; ink, pencil, and watercolor on paper, 91.5 × 203 cm (Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, RP-T-1914-17-3-A). More information and a high resolution image is available here»

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Press release (14 February 2017) from the Rijksmuseum:

Today the Rijksmuseum launches www.robertjacobgordon.nl through which all of Robert Jacob Gordon’s drawings, diaries and letters are made accessible to all for the first time. The 18th-century Dutch explorer documented South Africa’s inhabitants, flora, and fauna in more than 450 detailed drawings. He meticulously noted down in his diaries and letters everything he experienced during his expeditions. The drawings, which include unique 8-metre-long panoramas, form part of the collection at the Rijksmuseum. The diaries and letters are kept in the Brendhurst Library in Johannesburg. On the occasion of the exhibition Good Hope: South Africa and the Netherlands from 1600, all of Gordon’s diaries and drawings are reunited for the first time and thus present a comprehensive view of 18th-century South Africa.

Zoom in on 18th-Century South Africa

rp-t-1914-17-149-1

Robert Jacob Gordon, Giraffa camelopardalis (Giraffe), 1779 (Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, RP-T-1914-17-149).

Through robertjacobgordon.nl, visitors are given a complete portrait of what Gordon encountered, and where. The site enables visitors to zoom in on the 18th-century map Gordon created alongside contemporary South Africa via Google Maps. The comparison revealed the uncanny accuracy of Gordon’s measurements. His diaries and letters are also made available digitally for the first time via the website. Gordon’s travel notes, discovered in 1960, are kept in the Brandhurst Library in Johannesburg. Through the website, these documents are made accessible for the first time. The original texts have been transcribed and translated into English for the occasion, with special functions linking Gordon’s texts to his drawings.

Robert Jacob Gordon

The 18th-century Dutch scientist Robert Jacob Gordon (1743–1795) travelled through the interior of South Africa during the second half of the 18th century. As a zoologist, cartographer, geographer, linguist, meteorologist, and anthropologist, he recorded his discoveries in an ‘Atlas’—a treasure trove of 450 drawings along with spectacular panoramas, multiple metres in length, that show precisely how Gordon portrayed the land, its inhabitants and the flora and fauna. To record all of this in words and in pictures, he made four extensive expeditions deep into the interior of South Africa, where he was frequently the mediator between the local people and the colonists, resolving conflicts arisen from arson, murders, and cattle thefts. As a representative of the European Enlightenment, Gordon poured his knowledge and expertise into the creation of ‘Great Map’, his compendium which remained unfinished due to his suicide in 1795 post the British invasion. A large number of Gordon’s drawings and metres-long, meticulously drawn panoramas can be seen in Rijksmuseum’s exhibition Good Hope: South Africa and the Netherlands from 1600 (17 February to 21 May 2017).

robertjacobgordon.nl is made possible by Cees en Ingeborg van der Burg and is created by the Rijksmuseum in association with Fabrique and Q42. The web address is obtained thanks to the Doesburgs’ Historical Society HetHuisDoesburg.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Workshop and Symposium Grants from the Terra Foundation

Posted in fellowships, opportunities, resources by Editor on February 17, 2017

From the Terra Foundation:

Terra Foundation for American Art Academic Workshop and Symposium Grants
Fall 2017 Awards

Letters of inquiry due by 15 March 2017

The Terra Foundation for American Art actively supports projects that encourage international scholarship on American art topics, as well as scholarly projects with focused theses that further research of American art in an international context. Academic program funding is available for in-person exchanges such as workshops, symposia, and colloquia that advance scholarship in the field of American art (circa 1500–1980) that take place
• In Chicago or outside the United States, or
• In the United States and examine American art within an international context and include a significant number of international participants.

Additionally, the foundation welcomes applications for international research groups. Such groups should involve 2 to 4 faculty members from two or more academic institutions, at least one of which must be located outside the United States. Groups should pursue specific research questions that will advance scholarship and meet in person two or more times.

Visual arts that are eligible for Terra Foundation Academic Workshop and Symposium Grants include all visual art categories except architecture, performance art, and commercial film/animation. We favor programs that place objects and practices in an art historical perspective.

Note: The foundation funds museum-organized educational programs related to exhibitions through its Exhibition Grants; therefore only organizers from universities and research institutes may apply for exhibition-related programs through the Academic Program area.

Within a given year, the foundation seeks to support a range of topics. Please note that grants in this area are typically capped at $25,000 with exceptions only made for unusual circumstances.

While the Terra Foundation for American Art welcomes recurring requests, organizations that have submitted multiple applications should note that the foundation also attempts to fund programs at a variety of organizations. Due to the competitive nature of this program area, not every request can be funded, regardless of prior support.

New Website | Early Modern Typography

Posted in resources by Editor on January 5, 2017

screen-shot-2017-01-04-at-1-50-48-pm

I imagine some Enfilade readers will find Early Modern Typography useful (it includes the eighteenth century); it’s also interesting to see a blog used as an index for a Flickr collection of images. As posted several days ago on the SHARP listserv (with permission from Paul Dijstelberge for resposting). CH

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Dear Friends,

On the first day of the year I want to present a new website: earlymoderntypography.com. I have been adding images to a Flickr collection for 7 years, but the access became more and more difficult, due to the sheer amount of images. Early Modern Typography functions as an index to the Flickr website of 70,000 images of type, historiated initials, images, pages, bindings, and so on. The Flickr collection functions as a repository containing the ‘rough’ material for a book I am writing on the 16th-century European decorated initials (to be finished in 2017, with a separate website with advanced search possibilities).

The Flickr site contains material of 800+ printers and is growing on a daily basis. In time I hope to use ICONCLASS and advanced image search to create an instrument for the history of the book in the broadest sense. In 2017 I hope to digitize the archives of the late Paul Valkema Blouw that contains all 16th-century Dutch printers from 1540 to 1600 and to start on the Dutch late 17th and 18th centuries. Dutch books can be rather boring so I will add initials and images from other European printers too, mainly from the 16th and 18th centuries.

There is another page that might be of interest: illustrations from early modern books. I am working on Ovid’s Metamorphoses and on our great collections of topography and medicine at the Allard Pierson / Special Collections at the University of Amsterdam. Ovid is part of a project to write a thesis on the Dutch editions of the Metamorphoses.

I hope 2017 will be a good year. Like Candide I will spend it with cultivating my garden, but not without looking out for our civilization in general.

Best,

Paul Dijstelberge
University of Amsterdam / Allard Pierson – Special Collections

Save

Save

Publication Grant, Historians of British Art

Posted in resources by Editor on December 23, 2016

HBA Publication Grant

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA who can demonstrate that the HBA subvention will replace their out of pocket costs. Applications are not accepted from institutions. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2017.

Continent Allegories in the Baroque Age: A Research Database

Posted in books, resources by Editor on December 16, 2016

csm_erdteilallegorien-datenbank-2_5dba285ab2

An introduction to the Erdteilallegorien im Barockzeitalter project and database:

Continent Allegories in the Baroque Age: A Research Database
By Marion Romberg, of the Austrian Research Project Erdteilallegorien im
Barockzeitalter
in the University of Vienna’s Department of History

During the late Renaissance—around 1570—humanists developed a new ‘shorthand’ way of representing the world at a single glance: personifications of the four continents Europe, Asia, Africa and America. While the continent allegory as an iconic type had already been invented in antiquity, humanists and their artists adapted the concept by creating the four- continent scheme and standardized the attributes characterizing the continents. During the next 230 years until ca. 1800, this iconic scheme became a huge success story. All known media were employed to bring the four continent allegories into the public and into people’s homes. Within this prolonged history of personifications of the continents, the peak was reached in the Late Baroque, and especially the 18th century. As a pictorial language they were interwoven with texts, dogmas, narratives and stereotypes. Thus the project team find himself asking: What did continent allegories actually mean to people living in the Baroque age?

Notably—though not exclusively—this question is the topic of a research project on continent allegories carried out between 2012 and 2016. The project team approached the subject in a new and systematic fashion. First, a clearly defined geographic area consisting of the greater part of Southern Holy Roman Empire from Freiburg in the Breisgau to the eastern frontier of Lower Austria including Vienna was chosen; the northern limit of the study area is constituted by the Main River, the southern one by South Tyrol. Secondly, the project studied continent allegories in immovable media like fresco, stucco and sculptures within abbeys, palaces, parks and gardens, townhouses and—most importantly—in churches. The systematic survey conducted by the project team identified 407 instances of continent allegories in the south of the Holy Roman Empire. To facilitate the systematic and detailed analysis of all identified instances of continent allegories, a database was developed and is now open access: continentallegories.univie.ac.at. This database allows the use of the collection of sources for various research interests: iconography and iconology, reception of aesthetics, cultural history, social history, history of identity, history of science, etc.

Further results of this research project can be found in the in English published anthology The Language of Continent Allegories in Baroque Central Europe (Stuttgart, 2016) and in the doctoral thesis by Marion Romberg “Die Welt im Dienst der Konfession. Erdteilallegorien in Dorfkirchen auf dem Gebiet des Fürstbistums Augsburg im 18. Jahrhundert“ (Stuttgart, 2017).

Project Team, 2012–16
Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schmale, University of Vienna, www.wolfgangschmale.eu
Dr. Marion Romberg, University of Vienna, www.marionromberg.eu
Dr. Josef Köstlbauer, University of Bremen, josef.koestlbauer@univie.ac.at

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Wolfgang Schmale, Marion Romberg, and Josef Kostlbauer, eds., The Language of Continent Allegories in Baroque Central Europe (Stuttgart, Franz Steiner Verlag, 2016), 240 pages, ISBN 978  3515  114578, 52€ / $78.

cover004The iconography of the four continents dates back to 16th and early 17th centuries, at a time when Europe’s vision of the world was changed dramatically by discovery and conquest of the New World. Its peak of dissemination was reached in the 18th century. The late Baroque claims a special role for two reasons: first is the large number of reproductions and applications during this period, and the second is the multifaceted significance these allegories enjoyed. They could be inserted into religious and liturgical settings as well as into political language or that of the history of civilization and mankind. ‘Language’ in this sense means that the continent allegories were less the object of an art historical interpretation than being considered a formative part of religious, liturgical, political, historical, and other discourses. As pictorial language they were interwoven with text, dogmas, narratives, and stereotypes. Thus the authors of this volume inquire what the allegories of the four continents actually meant to people living in the Baroque age.

Cover image: Continent Allegories by Johann Baptist Enderle in the parish church St. Martin in Schwabmühlhausen (Germany) of 1759 (detail).

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save