Enfilade

Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World

Posted in resources by Editor on April 3, 2018

Results for a search for ‘Hubert Robert’; screen shot from Hannah Williams and Chris Sparks, Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World, www.artistsinparis.org (accessed 2 April 2018). As noted in the FAQs for the site, “there are 10,915 addresses in the database,” with coverage for “a total of 471 artists,” that is, for “every artist admitted to the Academy between 1675 and 1793.” Useful site details are available with the ‘settings’ tab.

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From the ‘About’ page of Artists in Paris:

Artists in Paris: Mapping the 18th-Century Art World

Artists in Paris is an open-access digital art history project funded by The Leverhulme Trust and supported by Queen Mary University of London. The Principal Investigator of the project is Dr Hannah Williams. The website was designed and built by Dr Chris Sparks.

Introduction

Paris is a city renowned for its artistic communities. Neighbourhoods like Montmartre and Montparnasse in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are familiar spaces of artistic activity and sociability. But when it comes to earlier generations of artists, we know strikingly little about how they inhabited the city.

Where did the artists of eighteenth-century Paris live? Which artists were neighbours? What sub-communities formed within the city? Which neighbourhoods formed the cultural geography of the eighteenth-century art world? And did that geography change over the course of the century?

This website provides answers to these tantalising questions about the geography and demography of the Paris art world in the eighteenth century. Based on original archival research retrieving the addresses of hundreds of artists’ homes and studios, this website uses digital mapping technologies to locate those spaces on georeferenced historical maps, making them available for visitors to explore.

Significance

Artists in Paris is the first project to map comprehensively where artistic communities developed in the eighteenth-century city and offers rich scope for subsequent investigations into how these communities worked and the impact they had on art practice in the period. Yielding crucial new information and harnessing the exciting possibilities of digital humanities for art-historical research, this website is intended as a valuable resource for anyone studying or researching French art, or for anyone with an interest in the history of Paris.

With its two modes—Year and Artist—the website accommodates searches either by date or by person. For instance, visitors can explore where every artist was living at certain moments in time, or they can select individual artists and explore all the addresses lived at across their careers. Designed to be simultaneously inviting and informative, these interactive data-enriched maps answer many questions about the Paris art world. But they are also intended as an empirical base upon which to pose new kinds of inquiries, inspiring continued explorations into networks of artistic sociability, the role of the city in art production, the geography of the art world, and urban experience more generally.

Credits & Acknowledgements

Artists in Paris has been funded through a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Research Fellowship, awarded to Hannah Williams and held at Queen Mary University of London (2015–2018). Additional support for the project has been provided by Queen Mary University of London. Preliminary stages of the research were funded by a grant from the University of Oxford’s John Fell Fund, awarded to Hannah Williams, and undertaken at the University of Oxford (2013–2015).

Thanks are due to the many people who offered advice and suggestions, attended research seminars, workshops, and usability testing sessions, and provided feedback and encouragement throughout the project. Among the many are Laura Auricchio, Robin Carlyle, Craig Clunas, Rebecca Emmett, Noémie Étienne, Keren Hammerschlag, Colin Jones, Meredith Martin, Gay McAuley, Chris Moffatt, David Pullins, Helen Stark, Chloe Ward, Sam Williams, Emma Yates, the community of developers on Stack Overflow, students at Queen Mary University of London and the University of London in Paris, and attendees of presentations at the Institute of Historical Research in London, the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte in Paris, University of Birmingham, University of St Andrews, and the National Gallery of Art in Canberra.

Special thanks are due to Dr Mia Ridge (British Library) for advice and technical support from the project’s inception and throughout its development.

The website logo and colour-design are by Jason Varone.

This website was built using OpenLayers and Bootstrap. It also makes use of other great libraries including Handelbars. The historical maps were georeferenced using Map Warper. The greyscale contemporary map layer is by Stamen Design, licensed under CC BY 3.0. Map data is by OpenStreetMap under ODbL. The digitized historical maps of Paris have been sourced from Wikimedia Commons.

Redesigned ‘Dictionary of Art Historians’ Unveiled

Posted in resources by Editor on March 27, 2018

As announced by the team behind the Dictionary of Art Historians (21 March 2018). . . And as noted toward the end of the announcement, the DAH continues to accept contributions, including new entries.

A thirty-year-old resource emerged today as a modern reference tool for art history. The Dictionary of Art Historians announces a new interface, data structure, and user options, the product of a year-long redesign. The original tool, a website since 1996, was developed privately by Lee Sorensen, the art and visual studies librarian at Duke University. Duke’s Wired! Lab for digital art history & visual culture sponsored the project beginning in 2016. The new DAH offers searchable data on over 2400 art historians, museum directors, and art-writers of western art from all time periods. Over 200 academic websites have linked to the project; the tool has been called one of the core tools of art historiography and cited in books and journal articles.

Begun pre-internet in 1986 as a card file, the project addressed a lack of information on the intellectual heritage that art historians created or used in writing art histories. “Before the DAH, it was impossible to discover even simple things like an art historian’s scholarly reputation, his/her core writings or even under whom they studied,” Sorensen said. “These things are important when reading a text or trying to understand the errors of past research.”

“The project’s redesign recognizes twenty-first-century scholars’ need to access information in the DAH using multiple digital research methods,” said Hannah Jacobs, Wired!’s digital humanities specialist responsible for the redesign, “It redefines the project content as data that can be mined at both micro and macro levels. By standardizing the data and developing new ways to access the data, we are making methods such as text mining, data analysis, and data visualization possible for our audiences.”

The new Dictionary of Art Historians site will continue to be developed over the coming year. New features to be released include
• Additional filtering capabilities on the ‘Explore’ page
• Ability to export filtered entries in open data formats
• Additional resources for citation management
• New data fields
• New and updated entries

The Dictionary of Art Historians continues to accept contributions. Please submit feedback about the project, new entries, or edits to existing entries to contact@arthistorians.info.

Digital History | Fashion History Timeline

Posted in online learning, resources by internjmb on March 10, 2018

From the Fashion History Timeline, a project by FIT’s History of Art Department:

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The Fashion History Timeline is an open-access source for fashion history knowledge, featuring objects and artworks from over a hundred museums and libraries that span the globe. The Timeline website offers well-researched, accessibly written entries on specific artworks, garments and films for those interested in fashion and dress history. Started as a pilot project by Fashion Institute of Technology art history faculty and students in the Fall of 2015, the Timeline aims to be an important contribution to public knowledge of the history of fashion and to serve as a constantly growing and evolving resource not only for students and faculty, but also for the wider world of those interested in fashion and dress history–from the Renaissance scholar to the simply curious.

Exhibition | Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, resources by Editor on January 10, 2018

Now on view at the Mazarin Library (with the full press release available as a PDF file here)

Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières
Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, 20 October 2017 — 19 January 2018

L’Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (1751–1772), codirigée par Diderot, D’Alembert et Jaucourt, constitue la plus vaste entreprise éditoriale du 18e siècle, par le nombre des forces humaines mobilisées, l’étendue des savoirs convoqués, et son retentissement en Europe. La publication de cet « ouvrage immense et immortel » (Voltaire), dont la première édition rassemble 28 volumes, quelque 74 000 articles et près de 2 600 planches, s’étend sur plus de 25 ans. Autorisée par un privilège de librairie (1746), elle est censurée alors que deux tomes sont déjà imprimés (1752), puis tolérée (1753), à nouveau interdite et condamnée à la destruction (1759), et enfin poursuivie grâce à une permission tacite (1759–1772). Et, parce qu’elle constitue une entreprise commerciale à succès, elle connaît immédiatement réimpressions et contrefaçons.

Pour la première fois, une édition critique de l’Encyclopédie voit le jour. Réalisée au format numérique et menée de façon collaborative par plus de 120 chercheurs de tous horizons, elle vise l’annotation progressive des articles et des planches, en mobilisant l’ensemble des connaissances sur l’ouvrage. Soutenue par l’Académie des sciences, l’Édition Numérique Collaborative et CRitique de l’Encyclopédie (ENCCRE)1 s’appuie sur un exemplaire exceptionnel du premier tirage de la première édition, conservé par la Bibliothèque Mazarine qui en a fait l’acquisition au 18e siècle, volume après volume.

L’exposition met en relation cet exemplaire original et l’édition numérique. Elle montre ce que fut le travail de l’Encyclopédie au 18e siècle, et ce que représente son édition critique au 21e. De l’architecture complexe de l’ouvrage à son histoire éditoriale, on y découvre matériellement et numériquement l’intérieur de l’œuvre, ses enjeux et ce qui fut une de ses ambitions fondamentales : « changer la façon commune de penser ». (Diderot).

Organisation et commissariat
Alain Cernuschi (Université de Lausanne)
Alexandre Guilbaud (Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu) Marie Leca Tsiomis (Université Paris Ouest, Société Diderot) Irène Passeron (Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu)
Yann Sordet (Bibliothèque Mazarine)
Anne Weber (Bibliothèque Mazarine)

Alain Cernuschi, Alexandre Guilbaud, Marie Leca-Tsiomis, Irène Passeron, with Yann Sordet, preface by Cathérine Bréchignac, Oser l’Encyclopédie: Un combat des Lumières (Paris: EDP Sciences, 2017), 120 pages, ISBN: 978  27598  21389, 15€.

The Launch of the King’s Friends Network

Posted in resources by Editor on December 4, 2017

From the Georgian Papers Programme:

10 November 2017 saw an important milestone in the evolution of the Georgian Papers Programme with the public launch of The King’s Friends network. The King’s Friends is a free-to-join international community of those whose work stands to benefit from the digitization of the Georgian papers in the Royal Archives, and who in turn can help make the project a success. We hope that a very wide range of researchers working on eighteenth-century or early nineteenth-century themes will join the King’s Friends network, and find it of use and interest in research not only on themes closely related to the history of the British monarchy and its jurisdictions, but to a whole range of topics from the histories of science, agriculture and medicine to the histories of gender and interpersonal relations, and the histories of art, collections, consumption, food and fashion, to mention just a few!

Click here to learn more and join the King’s Friends Network.

AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators

Posted in museums, resources by Editor on October 6, 2017

From the Association of Art Museum Curators:

AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators
Applications due by 20 October 2017

The AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators, made possible with major support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, is a two-year Program for three non-US based curators and three US Liaisons working on or having worked within exhibitions and projects that explore historic American Art (c. 1500–1980), including painting; sculpture; works on paper, including prints, drawing and photography; decorative arts; and excluding architecture; design; and performance. The Program offers numerous benefits for Awardees, including travel funding.

Through fostering international relationships between curators, the Program aims to not only provide opportunities for professional development and exchange, but also to expand and strengthen the international curatorial community and give primacy to the curatorial voice in the international dialogue between museum professionals.The Program will be an active part of building international partnerships, leading cross-border conversations, and spearheading international representation within AAMC’s membership & AAMC Foundation’s efforts.

Program Goals
• Form new international relationships and partnerships through the interaction of each International Awardee with their US Liaison and the larger AAMC community of members & supporters
• Provide opportunities for International Awardee to engage with US museum networks and professional development opportunities through AAMC membership benefits, including travel funding to the AAMC Annual Conference; Program-specific webinars and access to past AAMC webinars; AAMC Committee or Task Force participation; an Annual Alumni reception; visit to US Liaison’s institution, and more
• Foster awareness of the concerns and needs of curators working outside the US within AAMC’s membership and within the AAMC Foundation programming
• Establish a long lasting relationship between AAMC, AAMC Foundation, the International Awardees, and community of international scholars
• Bring an international voice to AAMC’s leadership through engagement with the organization’s donor groups and involvement on an AAMC Committee

Additional information, including details for International Curators and US Liaisons, is available here»

Survey of Scholarly Reading Practices

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on September 29, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment (formerly, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century) is undertaking our first-ever reader survey, and we are seeking your help to complete the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices.

Published by the Voltaire Foundation at the University of Oxford, the Studies has been publishing scholarly work on the Enlightenment since 1955. This longevity is due in good part to its strong bond with you—our readers, authors and reviewers. As we move forward into our seventh decade, the editorial team seeks to ensure that we continue to publish innovative research on topics at the forefront of the field—and to make this work as widely accessible as possible. Hence we are asking, in this survey, how our community accesses scholarship—both print and digital. The survey requires fewer than 15 minutes to complete and can be taken in either English or French. It opens for responses on Wednesday, September 27, and will remain open until Sunday, October 29.

No identifying information about respondents will be retained outside of the survey responses. All responses will be kept anonymous and confidential. Aggregated findings will be shared with the scholarly community in due course. Further details concerning the survey are available here.

To take the survey, please follow this link: Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment survey of scholarly reading practices

In recognition of your commitment to Enlightenment values of tolerance and international humanism, the Voltaire Foundation will make charitable contributions to Amnesty International and Médecins Sans Frontières, for each survey completed.

Please address any questions or concerns to Gregory.Brown@voltaire.ox.ac.uk. Thank you for your support of Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment!

Paul Mellon Centre Publication Grants

Posted in opportunities, resources by Editor on August 23, 2017

From the PMC:

Paul Mellon Centre Publication Grants
Applications due by 30 September 2017

The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art offers a variety of Fellowships (for individuals) and Grants (for institutions and individuals) twice a year in a strictly timetabled schedule. The programme supports scholarship, academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present, although all supported topics must have an historical perspective.

We do not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. We have no discretionary funds outside our stated programme.

Publication Grants are offered annually. They are awarded to publishers, institutions and/or authors to offset costs incurred in producing works of scholarship in print or in other media. Grants are intended to make possible publications and articles which would otherwise not appear or which would appear in reduced specification.

The Paul Mellon Centre supports scholarly publications concerned with the study of British art and architectural history in both print and online format. Applications will be considered for both long (monographs, catalogues, edited volumes) and short form (articles) texts.

Publisher Costs
A maximum grant of £7,000 is available when applied for by a Publisher to support costs associated with the production of long-form publications in print or digital format. The following costs may be claimed:
• Printing and binding
• Design and layout
• Licensing of images, reproduction and copyright costs
•  Graphics
• Indexing
• Production

Author Costs
A maximum grant of £3,000 is available to support costs incurred by authors for long-form publications, or £1,000 for a short-form publications, in either print or digital format. The following costs may be claimed:
• Licensing of images, reproduction and copyright costs
• Commission of new photography
• Commission of graphics

Joint applications from Authors and Publishers may be considered for a maximum of £10,000 (£7,000 towards production costs and £3,000 towards the reproduction costs incurred by the Author) with the fund being paid in a lump sum to the Publisher.

Alternatively, a Publisher may apply separately for publishing costs of up to £7,000 or an Author may apply separately for costs concerning image reproductions of up to £3,000. Only one grant application can be made per publication.

A smaller amount of up to £1,000 can be applied for by an Author working on an article (in print or online) for image licencing costs.

Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2018. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2017.

Library Research Grants from the Getty

Posted in fellowships, opportunities, resources by Editor on August 12, 2017

From The Getty:

Getty Research Institute Library Research Grants
Applications due by 16 October 2017

Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support for researchers requiring the use of specific collections housed in the Getty Research Institute (GRI). The GRI’s grant budget has been generously supplemented by donations from Getty Research Institute Council members and the Getty Conservation Institute.

Specialized Library Research Grant Opportunities
In addition to the open call for applications relating to projects utilizing any specific area of the GRI’s collections, several focused grants will be awarded in the following areas of study:
• Research related to the modern commercial art market, Los Angeles modern architecture, or design
• Research in the area of 18th-century German art as it relates to the religious, philosophical, and aesthetic contextualization of the Romantic movement
• Research within the GRI’s photo archive, a collection of two million photographs of works of art and architecture providing opportunities for original pictorial research in the fine arts, including the history of photography
• Research that utilizes the Conservation Collection, specialized research materials related to the preservation and conservation of material cultural heritage

Eligibility
Library Research Grants are intended for researchers of all nationalities and at any level who demonstrate a compelling need to use materials housed in the Research Library, and whose place of residence is more than eighty miles from the Getty Center. Projects must relate to specific items in the library collection. (To search the collections, please consult the Research Library’s Search Tools and Databases.)

Terms
Library Research Grants are intended to provide partial support for costs relating to travel, lodging, and living expenses. Housing is not provided. In general, grants are awarded as follows depending upon the distance traveled:
• Within California (must be more than 80 miles away from GRI): $800
• North America, including Canada and Mexico: $1,500
• International outside of North America: $3,000

The research period may range from several days to a maximum of three months. These terms apply as of August 2017 and are subject to future changes. Please see important information about the terms of these grants here.

Notification Process
Applicants are notified of the Research Institute’s decision approximately two months following the deadline. Applicants who do not receive grant awards are still welcome to use the Research Library in accordance with its access policy.

Application Availability and Deadline
Complete application materials are now accepted through an online application process only. The next deadline to submit application materials (including letters of recommendation) for these grants is 5:00pm (PDT) October 16, 2017.

More information is available here»

A Visual History of Rome: The Rodolfo Lanciani Digital Archive

Posted in resources by Editor on July 5, 2017

Francis Towne, The Colosseum from the Palatino, 1740; watercolor, 53.4 × 37.5 cm (Rome: Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte, Rodolfo Lanciani Collection, 16649 and Roma XI.1.I.15).

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Press release from Stanford, via Art Daily:

A team, which includes Stanford researchers, has created a new digital archive to study Rome’s transformation over the centuries. Images of Rome: The Rodolfo Lanciani Digital Archive, which went online in the spring, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs, and sketches of Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries [with over 1,000 from the 18th century]. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani (1845–1929), who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.

“Rome is a layered city,” said Erik Steiner, co-director of the Spatial History Project at Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA). “To be able to see that history you need to look through those layers, and this collection helps that process.”

The archive is a culmination of a two-year collaboration among CESTA, the Stanford University Libraries, University of Oregon, Dartmouth College, and the Italian government.

“This is part of our long-term ambition to bring one of the most documented cities in the world to the digital age,” Steiner said. “The project marries intense scholarly interest in Rome with best practices and tools built by the Stanford Libraries.”

Francesco Panini, Museo Vaticano, Museo Pio Clementino, 1775; watercolored pen and ink drawing, 72 × 51.2 cm (Rome: Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte, Rodolfo Lanciani Collection, Roma XI.61.II.69).

After Lanciani’s death in 1929, his library, which contains more than 21,000 items, was sold to the Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte (Italy’s National Institute of Archaeology and Art History) in Rome. Archaeologists, historians, architects, and other researchers who study ancient cities have used the collection to glean valuable information about Rome’s history and structure.

“These materials are very important and have been used by many different scholars, but access to them is quite limited,” said Roman archaeologist Giovanni Svevo, who also worked on the digital archive.

Viewing the archive requires a visit to the historic 15th-century Palazzo Venezia in central Rome. Lanciani’s collection is on the fourth floor and in its own dedicated room, which is open for only a few hours during weekdays. Only one folder from the collection can be viewed at a time. So the team—Steiner, Svevo, James Tice, a principal investigator on the project and an architecture professor at the University of Oregon, and Nicola Camerlenghi, an assistant professor of art history at Dartmouth College—set out to bring some of the collection onto the internet. Supported by a 2015 grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, they partnered with Italy’s Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism, and the National Institute to scan and create high-resolution images of each of the thousands of materials in the collection.

“Our collaboration with the Italian government on this project was very important,” Camerlenghi said. “It’s such a big help to scholars across the world when such teamwork can occur.”

Each digital object was categorized and tied to a descriptive set of data, so it could be properly stored and searched online. This part of the project demanded the most effort and care, the researchers said. The digital images and all associated descriptions are now permanently preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository.

“We believe this project is important for two reasons: it provides accessibility to a precious archival collection and, more broadly, it demonstrates a method whereby similar materials can be made available to scholars, students and the general public through the digital humanities,” Tice said.

Digitizing Lanciani’s collection is part of a larger effort to recreate the spatial history of Rome, a project named Mapping Rome, which Steiner and Tice began around 2004. As part of that effort, the team digitized the work of two 18th-century Italian architects, Giambattista Nolli and Giuseppe Vasi. They are also still working on completing the digitization of Lanciani’s famous Forma Urbis Romae, a cartographic map that traces Rome’s ancient ruins and its later developments. The map is 17 feet by 24 feet and is considered to have the most detailed information about Rome’s historical topography. The team envisions the end product to be an interactive map of Rome that links to the digitized archival materials.

“This is about telling a story of a place and reconstructing its past,” Steiner said. Beside allowing access to any scholar in the world, digitizing the archives also ensures their future preservation, Steiner emphasized. He said he hopes that more libraries and institutions around the world will devote time and funding to digitizing the humanities’ enormous body of historical documents.

“Nothing in the end would substitute holding primary documents in your hands, but you can answer a lot of scholarly questions by looking at them online in high resolution,” Camerlenghi said.

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