Enfilade

In Memoriam | Christopher M. S. Johns (1955–2022)

Posted in obituaries by Editor on May 12, 2022

It is difficult to overstate Christopher’s generous and kind contributions to the HECAA community, collectively and individually, for so many members. And, of course, many readers were also just very fortunate to count him as a dear friend. From Vanderbilt:

Christopher M.S. Johns, the Norman L. and Roselea J. Goldberg Professor of Fine Arts and professor of history of art and architecture, died at his home on May 8 after a long illness. He was 67.

Johns graduated summa cum laude from Florida State University with a bachelor of arts. He went on to earn both a master of arts and a doctor of arts from the University of Delaware, where his doctoral thesis was titled “The Art Patronage of Pope Clement XI Albani and the Early Christian Revival in Eighteenth-Century Rome.”

“Christopher was a groundbreaking scholar who made significant contributions in areas that included early-modern Italian art and culture, Asian art history, and relationships between art, politics and religion,” said John Geer, Ginny and Conner Searcy Dean of the College of Arts and Science and professor of political science. “However, he also was a friend and colleague who will be remembered for his dedication to mentoring students. Christopher’s legacy will live on in all those students with whom he worked. He will be deeply missed in our college.”

Keep reading here»

The Burlington Magazine, April 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 18, 2022

The eighteenth century in the April issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (April 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucy Davis and Natalia Muñoz-Rojas, “The Provenance of Het Steen and The Rainbow Landscape by Rubens,” pp. 333–41. New documentary evidence elucidates the hitherto uncertain history of these two celebrated landscapes painted by Peter Paul Rubens ca. 1636. Having remained with this family after his death, they were purchased by the Marquess of Caracena, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and taken to Madrid. By 1706 they were in Genoa, in the collections of successively Bartolomeo Saluzzo (1652–1705) and Costantino Balbi (d. 1740). This article assimilates a number of archival discoveries that shed light not only on the provenance of these two paintings but also on two important Genoese collections.

• Lucia Bonazzi, “Richard Vickris Pryor in the Art Market of Napoleonic Europe,” pp. 342–49. The son of a Quaker family of brewers and wine merchants, Richard Vickris Pryor (1780–1807) spent his brief adult life in pursuit of paintings. A characteristic example of the sort of entrepreneur who sought to exploit the release of works of art onto the market in the wake of Napoleon’s campaigns, he scored his greatest success with the purchase of the Lechi collection in Brescia in 1802.

• Margaret Oppenheimer, “From Paris to New York: French Paintings from the Collection of Eliza Jumel,” pp. 350–61. Eliza Jumel (1775–1865), born in poverty, was one of New York’s richest women at her death in 1865. While in Paris in 1815–17 she formed the largest collection of European paintings yet assembled by an American, the largest part of them French. Sold in 1821, the collection has been all but forgotten, but it has proved possible to trace a number of the works she owned.

R E V I E W S

• Noémi Duperron, Review of the exhibition Le Théâtre de Troie: Antoine Coypel, d’Homère à Virgile (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 2022), pp. 394–96.
• Eric Zafran, Review of the exhibition Paintings on Stone: Science and the Sacred, 1530–1800 (Saint Louis Art Museum, 2022), pp. 396–99.
• Peter Y. K. Lam, Review of the exhibition catalogue Sarah Wong and Stacey Pierson, eds., Collectors, Curators, Connoisseurs: A Century of the Oriental Ceramic Society, 1921–2021 (Oriental Ceramic Society, 2021), pp. 402–03.
• Rowan Watson, Review of Richard Rouse and Mary Rouse, Renaissance Illuminators in Paris: Artists and Artisans, 1500–1715 (Harvey Miller, 2019), pp. 418–19.
• Richard Wrigley, Review of Iris Moon and Richard Taws, eds., Time, Media, and Visuality in Post-Revolutionary France (Bloomsbury, 2021), pp. 423–24.
• Philip Ward-Jackson Review of Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Neue Pinakothek: Katalog der Skulpturen; Volume I: Die Sammlung Ludwigs I, Volume II: Adolf von Hildebrand (Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), pp. 424–25. “This is a vital link in the chain between Enlightenment celebrations of worthies and grand hommes and such later nineteenth-century sculptural pantheons as those on the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the Albert Memorial, London . . .” (424).

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary for Jonathan Brown (1939–2022), pp. 427–28. As well as bringing many fresh insights to the study of the major Spanish artists from El Greco to Picasso, with a particular focus on Velázquez, Jonathan Brown made important contributions to the study of patronage and collecting and of the diffusion of the images and ideas in the wider Hispanic world. Much honoured in Spain as well as in his native America, he will also be remembered as a dedicated and assiduous teacher.

The Burlington Magazine, February 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on March 31, 2022

The eighteenth century in February’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (February 2022) — Northern European Art

Nathaniel Dance Holland, Portrait of Christian VII, King of Denmark, 1768, oil on canvas, 77 × 63 cm (Royal Collection Trust).

A R T I C L E S

• Sara Ayres, “Christian VII of Denmark’s Lost British Portraits,” pp. 155–63. In 1768–69 the young Christian VII of Denmark visited London and Paris, where several portraits of him were painted. Three were by artists born or working in Britain—Angelica Kauffmann, Edward Cunningham, known as Calze, and Matthew Peters. All are now lost, but evidence about the comissions survives in copies and prints, contemporary descriptions and documents in the Danish State Archives.

• Lars Hendrikman, “The Finding of the Infant Bacchus,” pp. 180–83.

R E V I E W S

• Camilla Pietrabissa, Review of the exhibition Venetia 1600: Births and Rebirths (Venice: Palazza Ducale, 2021–22), pp. 190–92.

• Ivan Gaskell, Review of the new galleries of Dutch and Flemish art at the MFA Boston (open from November 2021), pp. 195–98.

• Richard Stemp, Review of the exhibition Hogarth and Europe (London: Tate Britain, 2021–22), pp. 198–200.

• Maryl Gensheimer, Review of Fabio Barry, Painting in Stone: Architecture and the Poetics of Marble from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (Yale UP, 2020), pp. 216–17.

• Clare Hornsby, Review of Ortwin Dally, Maria Gazzetti, and Arnold Nesselrath, eds., Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717–1768): Ein Europ isches Rezeptionsph nomen / Fenomeno Europeo della Ricezione (Michael Imhof Verlag, 2021), pp. 217–18.

• Robert Skwirblies, Review of Lea Kuhn, Gemalte Kunstgeschichte: Bildgenealogien in der Malerei um 1800 (Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2020), pp. 218–19.

• Thomas Stammers, Review of Stacey Boldrick, Iconoclasm and the Museum (Routledge, 2020), p. 222.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Marjorie Trusted, “Christian Theuerkauff (1936–2021),” pp. 223–24. For many years Deputy Director of the sculpture collection at the Bode Museum, Berlin, and honorary professor at the city’s Free University, Christian Theuerkauff was a leading scholar of Baroque ivories, whose expert connosseurship and archival research definitively shaped our understanding of many of the outstanding sculptors in the medium.

 

In Memoriam | Jonathan Brown (1939–2022)

Posted in obituaries by Editor on January 19, 2022

NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts mourns the loss of Jonathan Brown, who passed away at his home in Princeton, New Jersey on January 17, 2022, at the age of 82. Jonathan first joined the Institute in 1973 as its Director, a position he held for five years. He remained at the Institute as the Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Fine Arts until his retirement in 2017. A distinguished colleague and world-renowned scholar of Spanish and Viceregal Mexican art, his contributions to the field will live on for generations to come through his students and his noteworthy publications. Edward Sullivan, Robert Lubar-Messeri, and Richard Kagan have written a remembrance available here. A celebration of Jonathan’s life and work is planned for later in the spring.

Exhibition | Julie Green: The Last Supper

Posted in exhibitions, obituaries, today in light of the 18th century by Editor on November 8, 2021

Installation view of Julie Green’s Last Supper exhibition, Bellevue Arts Museum.

◊    ◊    ◊    ◊    ◊

As noted by many news outlets—including The Art Newspaper, The Washington Post, the Smithsonian Magazine, The New York Times, and NPR (with an editorial by Scott Simon)—the artist Julie Green (1961–2021) died on October 12 at age 60, after battling ovarian cancer. An exhibition of 800 plates by Green is currently installed in Bellevue, Washington. While the ‘content’ of the project (the catalogue of inmates’ last meals) understandably receives the bulk of the attention, I imagine it’s impossible for most dixhuitièmistes not to see the long tradition of blue-and-white ware adaptation; and once a viewer goes there, the plates provide an indicting reminder of the historical origins of the inequities of the American criminal justice system, inequities in many cases derived from seventeenth- and eighteenth-century institutions. CH

Julie Green: The Last Supper
Bellevue Arts Museum, 4 September 2020 — 23 January 2022

800 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of US Death Row Inmates

Growing up, I admired quilts and ceramics in our Iowa home, as well as the larger-than-life historical figures and 20’ American flag made with ears of colored corn in a neighbor’s yard. Appreciation for homemade and handmade led me to paint blue food. I once shared my family’s support of Nixon and capital punishment. Now I don’t.

Oklahoma has higher per capita executions than Texas. I taught there, and that is how I came to read final meal requests in the morning paper. The Last Supper illustrates the meal requests of U.S. death row inmates. Cobalt blue mineral paint is applied to second-hand ceramic plates, then kiln-fired to 1,400 degrees by technical advisors Toni Acock and Sandy Houtman.

Of the 1,521 US executions to date, 570 occurred in Texas, the only state that doesn’t allow a final meal selection. In Texas, inmates are served the standard prison meal of the day. In states that allow a choice, traditions and restrictions vary. There is no alcohol allowed anywhere. Cigarettes are officially banned but sometimes granted. Most selections are modest. This is not surprising, as many are limited to what is in the prison kitchen. Others provide meals from local venues. Pizza Hut, Wendy’s, and Long John Silver’s are frequently selected in Oklahoma, where their fifteen-dollar allowance is down from twenty in the late 1990s. California allows restaurant take-out up to fifty dollars. Historical menus from Folsom prison, shared by April Moore, point to the 733 inmates on death row today in California. State and date of execution are listed for each plate.

While looking for a permanent home for the project, unless capital punishment ends soon, I will continue until there are 1,000 plates. For me, a final meal request humanizes death row. Menus provide clues on region, race, and economic background. A family history becomes apparent when Indiana Department of Corrections adds, “He told us he never had a birthday cake so we ordered a birthday cake for him.”

Art can be a meditation. Why do we have this tradition of final meals, I wondered, after seeing a 1999 request for six tacos, six glazed donuts, and a cherry Coke. Twenty-one years later, I still wonder.

Julie Green
8 August 2020

 

The Burlington Magazine, September 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on September 29, 2021

The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (September 2021)

E D I T O R I A L

• “Nicholas Goodison and The Burlington,” p. 779.

A R T I C L E S

• David Pullins, Dorothy Mahon, Silvia A. Centeno, “The Lavoisiers by David: Technical Findings on Portraiture at the Brink of Revolution,” pp. 780–91.
Recent technical examination of Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Antoine-Laurent and Marie-Anne Lavoisier in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, painted between 1787 and 1788, has revealed significant and previously unknown alterations that transform our understanding of this celebrated portrait, its author, and its sitters.

R E V I E W S

• Susan Babaie, Review of the exhibition Epic Iran (V&A, 2021), pp. 837–39.

• Jonathan Conlin, Review of the exhibition Creating a National Collection: The Partnership between Southampton City Art Gallery and the National Gallery (Southampton City Art Gallery, 2021), pp. 845–48.

• Tanya Harrod, Review of the newly renovated Museum of the Home (previously the Geffrye Museum), pp. 858–61.

• John Bold, Review of John Martin Robinson, Wilton House: The Art, Architecture, and Interiors of One of Britain’s Great Stately Homes (Rizzoli Electa, 2021), pp. 872–74.

• Simon Lee, Review of Janis Tomlinson, Goya: A Portrait of the Artist (Princeton UP, 2020), pp. 874–75.

• Peter Fuhring, Review of Elena Cooper, Art and Modern Copyright: The Contested Image (Cambridge UP, 2018), pp. 875–76.

O B I T U A R Y

• Simon Jervis, “Ronald Lightbown (1932–2021),” pp. 879–80.
Spending most of his career at the Victoria and Albert Museum and National Art Library, Ronald Lightbown was a scholar of exceptional breadth, whose publications ranged from goldsmiths’ work of the late Middle Ages to Renaissance art and from the history of jewellery to Baroque wax sculpture.

 

The Burlington Magazine, March 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 24, 2021

The eighteenth century in The Burlington (I’m catching up, gradually!) . . . CH

The Burlington Magazine 163 (March 2021)

Hubert Robert, Arch of Septimius Severus, 1756; pen with grey and beige washes, 73 × 52 cm (Musée de Valence).

A R T I C L E S

•  Pedro Luengo, “Spatial Rhetoric: Echoes of Madrid’s Alcázar in Palaces Overseas,” pp. 236–43.
Several key features of the Alcazar in Madrid—including the twin-courtyard plan, double staircase, and layout of the royal chapel—were replicated in royal palaces in Spain and elsewhere and in the viceregal palaces in Spain’s American empire as part of a desire to project a unified imperial image.

•  Yuriko Jackall and Kari Rayner, “Becoming Hubert Robert: Some New Suggestions,” pp. 244–53.
The thin documentation of Hubert Robert’s early years makes it difficult to understand how the largely untrained student who went to Rome in 1754 emerged as a leading talent in Paris in the mid 1760s. Close examination of his art suggests that his rapid development was due to a rigorous course of study of perspective and life drawing, probably in response to criticisms of his abilities by the secretary of the Académie Royale, Charles-Nicolas Cochin.

R E V I E W S

• Michael Hall, Review of Matthew Reeve, Gothic Architecture and Sexuality in the Circle of Horace Walpole (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2020), pp. 264–69.

• Antonio Mazzotta, Review of the exhibition Tiepolo: Venezia, Milano, l’Europa (Milan: Gallerie d’Italia, 2020–21), pp. 273–75.

• Christoph Stiegemann, Review of the exhibition Passion, Leidenschaft: Die Kunst der großen Gefühle (Münster: LWL-Museum für Kunst und Kultur, 2020–21), pp. 275–78.

• Stephen Leach, Review of Matthew Craske, Joseph Wright of Derby: Painter of Darkness (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2020), pp. 297–98.

• Philippe Malgouyres, Review of Suzanne Higgott, ‘The Most Fortunate Man of his Day’: Sir Richard Wallace: Connoisseur, Collector, and Philanthropist (Wallace Collection, 2018), pp. 298–99.

• Elena Almirall Arnal, Review of Carolina Naya Franco, El joyero de la Virgen del Pilar: Historia de una colección de alhajas europeas y americanas (Institución Fernando El Católico, 2019), pp. 302–03.

• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of Laura Windisch, Kunst, Macht, Image: Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici (1667–1743) im Spiegel ihrer Bildnisse und Herrschaftsräume (Böhlau Verlag, 2019), p. 303.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary of Carmen Garrido (1947–2020), pp. 305–06.
Director of the Gabinete de Documentación Técnica at the Prado for thirty years, Carmen Garrido made major contributions to the technical study of Spanish painting, in particular with her publications on Diego Velázquez.

• Ger Luijten, Obituary of David Scrase (1949–2020), pp. 306–08.
In a career spent almost entirely at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, David Scrase was responsible for numerous significant acquisitions and exhibitions. His magnum opus his his catalogue for the museum’s Italian drawings, published in 2011.

 

In Memoriam | Wilhelmina Cole Holladay (1922–2021)

Posted in museums, obituaries, on site by Editor on March 10, 2021

Press release (8 March 2021) from the NMWA:

Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, who founded the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), the first and only museum solely dedicated to championing women through the arts, died on Saturday, 6 March 2021, at the age of 98 in Washington, D.C. Against tremendous odds and with dedication, drive, and a singular vision, Holladay created a museum to help alleviate the underrepresentation of women artists in museums and galleries worldwide.

“For nearly 40 years, Wilhelmina Holladay has been the guiding light of our museum,” said Director Susan Fisher Sterling. “Mrs. Holladay knew the power of art and the importance of women in art and in the world. Her foresight in recognizing women artists of the past and championing women artists of the present by creating a new museum was visionary—even revolutionary—for the time. Her actions signaled a major shift in our thinking about art and society, and it is her genius and purpose we carry forward with us today.”

Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, A Museum of Their Own: National Museum of Women in the Arts (New York: Abbeville Press, 2008).

“Wilhelmina, ‘Billie’ as she was known to her friends, believed deeply in philanthropy and volunteerism,” said Board Vice-Chair and daughter-in-law Winton Smoot Holladay. “Her leadership and generosity established the museum, and she worked tirelessly to create an important institution where women artists could fully participate in and shape the national and international cultural conversation. Her unwavering sense of purpose and her love of art enriched the lives of all who were privileged to work alongside her.”

Holladay’s interest in art by women began in the 1970s, when she and her husband Wallace traveled widely to visit museums and galleries. They were particularly drawn to a painting they saw in Vienna, a 1594 still life by Flemish artist Clara Peeters. They saw additional paintings by Peeters at the Prado in Madrid. When Holladay attempted to learn more about the artist, she could find no information on Peeters—or any other female artist—in the standard art history textbook, H. W. Janson’s History of Art. Astonished by this discovery, the Holladays began to search for work by other women artists.

By the 1980s, the Holladay collection had grown to approximately 500 works by 150 artists, from the Renaissance to contemporary times. In addition to artwork, the Holladays kept an archive of catalogues, books, photographs, and biographical information on women artists. Nancy Hanks, then head of the National Endowment for the Arts, encouraged the Holladays to consider establishing a museum, and Holladay focused her considerable organizational and fundraising skills in this direction.

NMWA was incorporated in 1981, and for the next six years, Holladay opened her residence to the public for tours, traveled extensively to garner support for her idea, raised more than $20 million from public and private sources, purchased and renovated a historic building to house the collection, and donated her personal collection and library to the museum. On 7 April 1987, Barbara Bush, wife of the then-Vice President, cut the ribbon to open the museum in a 1907 Renaissance revival landmark building located two blocks from the White House.

NMWA’s collection has grown to include more than 5,500 works by approximately 1,000 artists, such as Louise Bourgeois, Mary Cassatt, Judy Chicago, Frida Kahlo, Georgia O’Keeffe, Faith Ringgold, and Élizabeth Louise Vigée-Lebrun. Special exhibitions have included premier solo showings of work by Camille Claudel (19th-century French), Remedios Varo (20th-century Mexican), Lavinia Fontana (16th-century Italian) and Carrie Mae Weems (contemporary American). The diversity of women’s artistic creativity has been showcased in exhibitions featuring treasures from the Hermitage, pottery by American Indians, theatrical creations by Julie Taymor, representations of the Virgin Mary in Western art, abstract art by Black women artists, and work by emerging artists in the museum’s signature Women to Watch series. These exhibitions have broadened the art historical canon to be more open and inclusive.

The museum is also a leader in online content and arts education, serving the local community through outreach to D.C. public and private charter schools as well as developing an arts education model for schools nationwide. NMWA’s Women, Arts, and Social Change public program initiative offers a platform for speakers and attendees to advance ideas and solutions to society’s most pressing issues—especially those affecting women and girls—and inspires action in the arts and beyond. NMWA also publishes a triennial magazine, serves as a center for the performing and literary arts, and maintains one of the foremost repositories of documents and materials on women artists.

In over 35 years, the museum’s budget has grown to $11 million, and the full-time staff numbers 50. NMWA members and donors—nearly 13,000 strong—come from all over the United States and 21 other countries. Its network of national and international committees has 25 outreach groups with more than 3,000 dedicated members throughout the United States and around the world, including Chile, France, Peru, and the United Kingdom. The committees host regional programs and serve as ambassadors for the museum.

Holladay was born on 10 October 1922, in Elmira, N.Y. She developed an early appreciation of art from her maternal grandmother. She earned a BA degree from Elmira College in 1944, studied art history at Cornell University, and completed postgraduate work in art history at the University of Paris in 1953–54. During World War II, Holladay worked in Washington, D.C., where she met her husband, an officer in the United States Navy. She worked as social secretary to Madame Chiang Kai-Shek from 1945 to 1948, but after the birth of her son Wallace Jr., she dedicated herself to volunteer projects.

In addition to serving as the museum’s chair of the board, Holladay was active in many other ventures, serving on the boards of the National Women’s Economic Alliance, the Adams National Bank, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the World Service Council of the YWCA, the American Academy in Rome, the United States Capitol Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art’s Collector’s Committee, and the International Women’s Forum. In recognition of her service, Holladay received the National Medal of Arts as well as diplomatic orders from France and Norway. She also was regularly listed as one of the most powerful women in Washington, D.C. and received a lifetime achievement award from the District of Columbia. Among Holladay’s other awards for her service to women include induction into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, a lifetime achievement award from the Women’s Caucus for Art, the Women Who Make a Difference Award from the International Women’s Forum, and the Distinguished Achievement Award from the National League of American Pen Women. She received honorary doctorate degrees from four colleges.

Holladay was predeceased by a son, Scott Cole Holladay and her husband, Wallace F. Holladay. Holladay is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, Wallace ‘Hap’ Holladay Jr. and Winton Holladay; four grandchildren, Brook Holladay Peters (Brian), Fitz Holladay, Jessica Holladay Sterchi (Louis), and Addison Holladay (Eliza); and nine great-grandchildren.

A celebration of life will be announced at a future date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions may be made to the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

National Museum of Women in the Arts, at 1250 New York Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C. Built in 1908 as a Masonic Temple—to designs by Wood, Donn, and Deming—the Renaissance revival style building has been home to the NMWA for 34 years. Photo: Wikimedia Commons, 2008.

The Burlington Magazine, July 2018

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on July 21, 2018

The eighteenth century in The Burlington:

The Burlington Magazine 160 (July 2018)

E D I T O R I A L

• Michael Hall, “At the Royal Academy of Arts,” p. 535. This is the Royal Academy’s year. The venerable London institution has celebrated its 250th anniversary by unveiling a redevelopment that has added seventy per cent more public space, staging a Summer Exhibition that has garnered five-star reviews, mounting an exhibition, The Great Spectacle, which traces the history of the annual exhibition since its inception in 1768, and publishing a monumental multi-author history of itself and its collections. . . .

A R T I C L E S

• Dorothea Diemer and Linda Hinners, “‘Gerhardt Meyer Made Me in Stockholm’: A Bronze ‘Bathing Woman’ after Giambologna,” pp. 545–53. Spurred by rivalry with French founders working for the Swedish Crown, in 1697 Gerhardt Meyer the Elder cast a bronze figure of a nude woman after a marble by Giambologna that had been in Sweden since 1632. It is inscribed ‘Me fecit Gerhardt Meyer Holmiae’.

R E V I E W S

• Laurel O. Peterson, Review of the exhibition Visitors to Versailles, 1682–1789 (Château de Versailles, 2017–18; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2018), pp. 582–84.
• Louis Cellauro and Gilbert Richaud, Review of the exhibition Jacques-François Blondel: An Enlightenment Architect in Metz (The Arsenal, Metz, 2018), pp. 584–86.
• Paul Taylor, Review of Susanna Berger, The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment (Princeton University Press, 2017), pp. 606–07.
• Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Review of the exhibition catalogue, Ilona Katzew, ed., Painted in Mexico / Pintado en México, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici (Prestel, 2017), pp. 607–08.
• Sophie Littlewood, Review of Donald J. La Rocca, How to Read European Armor (Metropolitan Museum of Art and Yale University Press, 2017), p. 613.

O B I T U A R I E S

• Andrew Wilton, Obituary of Malcolm Cormack (1935–2018), p. 617. When the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, opened in 1977, Malcolm Cormack was its first Curator of Paintings. At Yale, and subsequently at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, he staged influential exhibitions on subjects ranging from William Blake to the Camden Town Group.

 

In Memoriam | Linda Nochlin (1931–2017)

Posted in obituaries by Editor on October 30, 2017

From ARTnews:

Andrew Russeth, “Linda Nochlin, Trailblazing Feminist Art Historian, Dies at 86,” ARTnews (29 October 2017).

Linda Nochlin, the perspicacious art historian who brought feminist thought to bear on the study, teaching, and exhibition of art, reshaping her field, has died, according to people close to her family. She was 86.

In 1971, Nochlin earned widespread attention for her landmark essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?,” which approached that question with incisive and nuanced analysis, demonstrating how, for centuries, institutional and societal structures had made it “impossible for women to achieve artistic excellence, or success, on the same footing as men, no matter what the potency of their so-called talent, or genius.” But Nochlin also interrogated how “greatness” itself had long been formulated and evaluated. “In the field of art history, the white Western male viewpoint, unconsciously accepted as the viewpoint of the art historian, may—and does—prove to be inadequate not merely on moral and ethical grounds, or because it is elitist, but on purely intellectual ones,” she wrote in the essay, which was published in ARTnews.

That article quickly became a cornerstone for the developing field of feminist art history. It would have been enough to secure her place as one of art history’s most important writers, but over the course of her six-decade career, she also made formidable contributions to the study of Realism and Gustav Courbet, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and numerous contemporary artists. . . .

The full obituary is available here»

Save

%d bloggers like this: