Enfilade

The Burlington Magazine, April 2022

Posted in books, catalogues, exhibitions, journal articles, obituaries, reviews by Editor on April 18, 2022

The eighteenth century in the April issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 164 (April 2022)

A R T I C L E S

• Lucy Davis and Natalia Muñoz-Rojas, “The Provenance of Het Steen and The Rainbow Landscape by Rubens,” pp. 333–41. New documentary evidence elucidates the hitherto uncertain history of these two celebrated landscapes painted by Peter Paul Rubens ca. 1636. Having remained with this family after his death, they were purchased by the Marquess of Caracena, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and taken to Madrid. By 1706 they were in Genoa, in the collections of successively Bartolomeo Saluzzo (1652–1705) and Costantino Balbi (d. 1740). This article assimilates a number of archival discoveries that shed light not only on the provenance of these two paintings but also on two important Genoese collections.

• Lucia Bonazzi, “Richard Vickris Pryor in the Art Market of Napoleonic Europe,” pp. 342–49. The son of a Quaker family of brewers and wine merchants, Richard Vickris Pryor (1780–1807) spent his brief adult life in pursuit of paintings. A characteristic example of the sort of entrepreneur who sought to exploit the release of works of art onto the market in the wake of Napoleon’s campaigns, he scored his greatest success with the purchase of the Lechi collection in Brescia in 1802.

• Margaret Oppenheimer, “From Paris to New York: French Paintings from the Collection of Eliza Jumel,” pp. 350–61. Eliza Jumel (1775–1865), born in poverty, was one of New York’s richest women at her death in 1865. While in Paris in 1815–17 she formed the largest collection of European paintings yet assembled by an American, the largest part of them French. Sold in 1821, the collection has been all but forgotten, but it has proved possible to trace a number of the works she owned.

R E V I E W S

• Noémi Duperron, Review of the exhibition Le Théâtre de Troie: Antoine Coypel, d’Homère à Virgile (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 2022), pp. 394–96.
• Eric Zafran, Review of the exhibition Paintings on Stone: Science and the Sacred, 1530–1800 (Saint Louis Art Museum, 2022), pp. 396–99.
• Peter Y. K. Lam, Review of the exhibition catalogue Sarah Wong and Stacey Pierson, eds., Collectors, Curators, Connoisseurs: A Century of the Oriental Ceramic Society, 1921–2021 (Oriental Ceramic Society, 2021), pp. 402–03.
• Rowan Watson, Review of Richard Rouse and Mary Rouse, Renaissance Illuminators in Paris: Artists and Artisans, 1500–1715 (Harvey Miller, 2019), pp. 418–19.
• Richard Wrigley, Review of Iris Moon and Richard Taws, eds., Time, Media, and Visuality in Post-Revolutionary France (Bloomsbury, 2021), pp. 423–24.
• Philip Ward-Jackson Review of Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Neue Pinakothek: Katalog der Skulpturen; Volume I: Die Sammlung Ludwigs I, Volume II: Adolf von Hildebrand (Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2021), pp. 424–25. “This is a vital link in the chain between Enlightenment celebrations of worthies and grand hommes and such later nineteenth-century sculptural pantheons as those on the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the Albert Memorial, London . . .” (424).

O B I T U A R I E S

• Peter Cherry, Obituary for Jonathan Brown (1939–2022), pp. 427–28. As well as bringing many fresh insights to the study of the major Spanish artists from El Greco to Picasso, with a particular focus on Velázquez, Jonathan Brown made important contributions to the study of patronage and collecting and of the diffusion of the images and ideas in the wider Hispanic world. Much honoured in Spain as well as in his native America, he will also be remembered as a dedicated and assiduous teacher.

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