Enfilade

Two New HECAA Positions, Now Open

Posted in Member News, opportunities, site information by Editor on April 18, 2019

At this year’s annual HECAA business meeting, held in Denver on 22 March 2019, the membership discussed and gave general approval to the creation of a HECAA website and social media presence. The executive board is now eager to receive applications for these two positions. Although Enfilade was originally conceived as a ‘newsletter’ for HECAA, it was apparent within weeks of the site’s launch in 2009 that the readership would be much broader than the organization’s membership and thus the site has always had a somewhat peculiar relationship to the organization. As described in the recently updated constitution & bylaws, Enfilade will continue to be affiliated with HECAA—much like Journal18—but now seems to be a good time for developing distinct web and social media presences. These promising initiatives have my full support, and I look forward to what emerges. And no worries: I’ve no plans to discontinue Enfilade any time soon! The familiar format of a decade-old blog will scroll into the future as well. Craig Hanson

HECAA Website Designer

$2500–$3000 for an estimated 60–80 hour project,
using Wix, Weebly, or WordPress

Desired Features
• home page + interior pages, some with password-protected access for members only
• ability to add special events page (for future conferences, etc)
• portal page should be mobile-responsive
• integrated donation/payment system, with PayPal or similar to facilitate membership renewals, donations, other payments
• event calendar
• social photo gallery, integrated with social media posts

Qualifications
• a demonstrated competency with web design and familiarity with at least one of the possible software platforms
• a vision for the look and feel of HECAA’s web presence
• strong visual/writing skills
• an ability to work independently and to teach yourself/acquire new technical skills as needed

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and examples of past work in web design or content creation to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 15 May 2019.

HECAA Social Media Manager

$1500 stipend for one year, 1 July 2019 — 30 June 2020
about 10 hours/week expected

Establish and maintain two social media accounts on behalf of HECAA (Instagram + either Twitter or a Facebook Group). Create HECAA’s social media tone and look. Support website maintenance, once the HECAA website is completed.

Expectations
• make/oversee/coordinate at least one social media post per week, more during times of peak HECAA activity
• generate content for posts
• use accounts to highlight the work of HECAA members, build community, and increase visibility of eighteenth-century art history
• using Instagram as the chief platform, create content that is both aesthetically pleasing and informational
• may coordinate different HECAA members for temporary account takeovers
• coordinate with Enfilade and Journal18 to mutually enhance each other’s social media presence
• keep website up to date and in sync with social media and Enfilade: update calendar, sync photo gallery with social posts, etc.

Qualifications
• familiarity with Instagram plus either Facebook or Twitter
• a vision for HECAA’s social media identity and presence
• good people/ networking skills
• good research skills (for content generation purposes)
• strong visual/writing skills

To apply, send CV, cover letter, and two sample posts (geared to a platform of your choice) to Amelia Rauser arauser@fandm.edu. The HECAA Executive Board will review applicants beginning 1 June 2019.

New Book | Restoration

Posted in books by Editor on April 18, 2019

The publication resulting from the 64th annual Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts delivered at the National Gallery of Art in 2015 by Thomas Crow is now available from Princeton UP:

Thomas Crow, Restoration: The Fall of Napoleon in the Course of European Art, 1812–1820 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018), 208 pages, ISBN: 978-0691181646, $40 / £30.

As the French Empire collapsed between 1812 and 1815, artists throughout Europe were left uncertain and adrift. The final abdication of Emperor Napoleon, clearing the way for a restored monarchy, profoundly unsettled prevailing national, religious, and social boundaries. In Restoration, Thomas Crow combines a sweeping view of European art centers—Rome, Paris, London, Madrid, Brussels, and Vienna—with a close-up look at pivotal artists, including Antonio Canova, Jacques-Louis David, Théodore Géricault, Francisco Goya, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Thomas Lawrence, and forgotten but meteoric painters François-Joseph Navez and Antoine Jean-Baptiste Thomas. Whether directly or indirectly, all were joined in a newly international network, from which changing artistic priorities and possibilities emerged out of the ruins of the old.

Crow examines how artists of this period faced dramatic circumstances, from political condemnation and difficult diplomatic missions to a catastrophic episode of climate change. Navigating ever-changing pressures, they invented creative ways of incorporating critical events and significant historical actors into fresh artistic works. Crow discusses, among many topics, David’s art and influence during exile, Géricault’s odyssey through outcast Rome, Ingres’s drive to reconcile religious art with contemporary mentalities, the titled victors over Napoleon all sitting for portraits by Lawrence, and the campaign to restore art objects expropriated by the French from Italy, prefiguring the restitution controversies of our own time.

Beautifully illustrated, Restoration explores how cataclysmic social and political transformations in nineteenth-century Europe reshaped artists’ lives and careers with far-reaching consequences. Published in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Thomas Crow is the Rosalie Solow Professor of Art History at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. His many books include Emulation: David, Drouais, and Girodet in the Art of Revolutionary France; The Long March of Pop: Art, Music, and Design 1930–1995; and No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art. He lives in New York City and in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.