Enfilade

New Book | Romanticism and Illustration

Posted in books by Editor on May 20, 2019

From Cambridge UP:

Ian Haywood, Susan Matthews, and Mary Shannon, eds., Romanticism and Illustration (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019), 360 pages, ISBN: 978-1108425711, $120.

This collection of essays takes a fresh look at the important role of illustration in Romantic literature. The late eighteenth century saw an explosion of illustrated editions of literary classics and the emergence of a new culture of literary art, including the innovative literary galleries. The impact of these developments on the reading and viewing of literary texts is explored in a series of case studies covering poetry, historical texts, drama, painting, reproductive prints, magazines and ephemera. Romanticism and Illustration argues for a more detailed study of illustration which includes the context of a wider circulation of images across different media. The modern understanding of the word ‘illustration’ fails to convey the complex relationship between the artist, the engraver, the publisher, the text and the audience in Romantic Britain. In teasing out the implications of this dynamic cultural matrix, this book opens up a new field of Romantic studies.

C O N T E N T S

Figures
Notes on Contributors
Acknowledgements

Editors’ Introduction

Part I. Illustrating Poetry
1  Peter Otto, The Ends of Illustration: Explanation, Critique, and the Political Imagination in Blake’s Title-pages for Genesis
2  Sophie Thomas, ‘With a Master’s Hand and Prophet’s Fire’: Blake, Gray, and the Bard
3  Dustin Frazier Wood, Seeing History: Illustration, Poetic Drama, and the National Past
4  Martin Priestman, ‘Fuseli’s Poetic Eye’: Prints and Impressions in Fuseli and Erasmus Darwin
5  Susan Matthews, Henry Fuseli’s Accommodations: ‘Attempting the Domestic’ in the Illustrations to Cowper
6  Sandro Jung, Reading the Romantic Vignette: Stothard Illustrates Bloomfield, Byron, and Crabbe for The Royal Engagement Pocket Atlas
7  Maureen McCue, Intimate Distance: Thomas Stothard’s and J. M. W. Turner’s Illustrations of Samuel Rogers’s Italy

Part II. The Business of Illustration
8  Ian Haywood, Illustration, Terror, and Female Agency: Thomas Macklin’s Poets Gallery in a Revolutionary Decade
9  Luisa Calè, Maria Cosway’s Hours: Cosmopolitan and Classical Visual Culture in Thomas Macklin’s Poets Gallery
10  Mary Shannon, Artists’ Street: Thomas Stothard, R. H. Cromek, and Literary Illustration on London’s Newman Street
11  Brian Maidment, The Development of Magazine Illustration in Regency Britain: The Example of Arliss’s Pocket Magazine, 1818–1833

Coda, Martin Myrone, Romantic Illustration and the Privatization of History Painting

Bibliography
Index

Call for Papers | UAAC/AAUC 2019, Québec

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on May 20, 2019

From UAAC/AAUC:

Universities Art Association of Canada / l’association d’art des universités du Canada
Hilton Hotel, Québec, 24–27 October 2019

Proposals due by 31 May 2019

Every fall UAAC hosts Canada’s professional conference for visual arts based research by art historians, professors, artists, curators and cultural workers. The conference is held at a different location each year, normally at a Canadian university or college, and the sessions and panels address issues and subjects in art history, theory and practice from a variety of methodological approaches. We’re pleased to announce that UAAC-AAUC’s next conference will be held in beautiful Quebec City at the Hilton Hotel from October 24 to 27, 2019.

A selection of sessions potentially related to the eighteenth century, including the HECAA panel, is provided below. A full list of panels is available as a PDF file here.

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HECAA Open Session (Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture)
Chair: Joan Coutu (University of Waterloo), joan.coutu@uwaterloo.ca

HECAA works to stimulate, foster, and disseminate knowledge of all aspects of visual culture in the long eighteenth century. This open session welcomes papers that examine any aspect of art and visual culture from the 1680s to the 1830s. Special consideration will be given to proposals that demonstrate innovation in theoretical and/or methodological approaches.

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Au préalable : œuvre(s) préparatoire(s) et processus créatif aux temps médiévaux et modernes
Chair: Audrey Adamczak (Institut catholique de Paris), audrey.adamczak@videoton.ca

Nous proposons d’interroger l’œuvre préparatoire du Moyen-Age et de la première modernité quels que soient sa forme, sa destination ou le médium utilisé, en privilégiant les études qui aborderont les processus de création mis en jeu pour générer et fabriquer une œuvre d’art, qu’elle soit individuelle ou collective : pratiques d’atelier, changements/modifications de la première intention de l’artiste, reprise ou réemploi d’un modèle antérieur, etc. Nous accorderons une attention toute particulière aux propositions touchant aux domaines souvent peu étudiés tels que la gravure, l’illustration, l’enluminure, l’art du vitrail, la sculpture et les arts décoratifs, l’architecture et le décor.

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What Was History Painting and What Is It Now?
Chairs: Jordan Bear (University of Toronto), jordan.bear@utoronto.ca; and Mark Phillips (Carleton University), Mark.Phillips@carleton.ca

The dominant visual language of European painting from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century, history paintings were formidable in their monumental scale, ambitious moral lessons, and intricate narratives. With the rise of modernist avant-gardes, the genre receded from the forefront of artistic production into the realm of nostalgia. Yet history painting cast a shadow that would subtly colour even the works that sought to displace it.
This session invites presentations that explore the fortunes of this distinctive mode of visual representation. Papers might engage with any number of themes, including the creation of an audience attuned to the genre’s didactic aims, the entry of history painting into the marketplace of commercial art and attractions, or the reimagination of the mode in response to the edicts of modern and contemporary art and decolonization. We are eager to investigate the genre in its full range of geographical and chronological variety, and to consider both the tradition and the vibrant ways in which it resonates through the art of the present.

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Exhibiting Animals in the Long Nineteenth Century
Chair: Elizabeth Boone (University of Alberta), betsy.boone@ualberta.ca

Animals, both wild and domesticated, were regularly exhibited during the long nineteenth century. They appeared on canvas and as sculpture in fine art exhibitions; as public art works marking fair grounds, parks, and zoos; mounted through the art of taxidermy; and live in circus performances and at agricultural fairs. Some animals—usually those known for their performance abilities, noteworthy value, or bloodlines—appear in named portraits, while others functioned as type, to evoke particular emotions, or to communicate societal values and attitudes about these non-human beings. This session invites papers from scholars interested in exploring the current state of animal studies and the representation of animals in an exhibitionary context.

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Domestic Encodings through Craft Objects
Chairs: Ruth Chambers (University of Regina), Ruth.Chambers@uregina.ca; and Mireille Perron (Alberta University of the Arts, former ACAD University), Mireille.Perron@acad.ca

Desire, fear, pleasure, projection, and uncertainty loom large in concepts of home and domesticity. Craft objects in particular have sustaining connections with home and with the production of domestic space; how and what kind of space is produced through crafted objects is of renewed concern for many historians, curators, craft persons, and artists. Examples of recent scholarship and practice include, but are not limited to: Craft, Space and Interior Design 1855–2005, Sandra Alfody ed.; Breaking and Entering: The Contemporary House Cut, Spliced, and Haunted, Bridget Elliott ed.; and the works of Ann Low, Laura Vickerson, Shannon Bool, Carmen Laganse, Amy Malbeuf, Luanne Martinau, Judy Chartrand, and Lindsay Arnold, to name but a few Canadian artists. Following, but not restricted to investigations of these leads, we will offer Craft practice, theory, discourse, and history as ways to uncover, transform, validate, and better understand our production of domesticity. All historical, methodological and material approaches are welcome.

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Making Sense of the Senses: Evaluating the Sensorium in Visual Culture
Chair: Samantha Chang (University of Toronto), samantha.chang@mail.utoronto.ca

The classification, discrimination, and individuation of the senses have long been a topic of discussion among scholars in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Although the paradigm of the five senses can be found in philosophical texts from Ancient Greece and China, the sensory categories defined differed significantly between the two regions. This disparity of sense perception informed the interdisciplinary field of sensory studies and following the sensory turn of the 1990s, led to a profusion of sense-specific subfields, especially those related to visual culture. While the invention of visual culture collapsed the hierarchy of high/low art (Berger 1972; Baxandall 1972; Alpers 1983), the proliferation of visual culture studies further entrenches the hierarchical division of the senses (Howes 2018). This panel seeks to explore interpretations of the sensorium in visual culture and evaluate the cultural and social connections/implications of the senses in art.

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On Performance, Exhibitions, and Archives
Chairs: Barbara Clausen (Université du Québec à Montréal), clausen.barbara@uqam.ca; and Erin Silver (University of British Columbia), erin.silver@ubc.ca

This panel, which springboards from Clausen’s research on performance’s representational politics as a hybrid art form in the tension field of the live and mediated, and Silver’s research on the superimposition of embodied movement and political movements, examines how these practices find their various modes of existence within and beyond the framework of the institutional spaces they occupy. Bridging the recent fervour for dance’s representational and political potential within gallery spaces, to performance’s status as one of the most dominantly promoted art forms today, this panel asks: how do movement- and performance-based practices operating at the intersection of the exhibition and the archive contribute to and shape concepts of agency, site specificity, and immediacy in the cultural sphere? We invite submissions in French and English that explore notions of the performative in relation to the museum and new formats of curating, archiving, and digital mediation.

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Séance Ouverte (Réseau Art et Architecture du 19e siècle) / Open Session (Research on Art and Architecture of the 19th Century)
Chairs: Peggy Davis (Université du Québec à Montréal), davis.peggy@uqam.ca; and Ersy Contogouris (Université de Montréal), ersy.contogouris@umontreal.ca

L’objectif du Réseau Art et Architecture du 19e siècle (www.raa19.com) consiste à promouvoir le renouveau des recherches globales et interdisciplinaires sur le 19e siècle en histoire de l’art et de l’architecture. Cette session ouverte invite des propositions théoriques ou des études de cas qui couvrent des corpus issus du long 19e siècle, de 1789 à 1914. Une attention particulière sera donnée aux propositions qui font ressortir de nouvelles problématiques ou des méthodologies novatrices.

The aim of the RAA19 (Research on Art and Architecture of the 19th century; http://www.raa19.com) is to encourage innovative studies of nineteenth-century art and architecture. This open session welcomes papers that examine theoretical issues or case studies that focus on any aspect of the art and architecture of the long nineteenth century, from 1789 to 1914. Special consideration will be given to papers that propose innovative issues or methodologies.

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Perspectives on the Dutch Golden Age
Chairs: Stephanie Dickey(Queen’s University), stephanie.dickey@queensu.ca; and Amy Golahny (Lycoming College), golahny@lycoming.edu

We propose a session on the historiography and reception of Dutch art produced in the period c. 1575–1700, exploring how artists, admirers, and critics have responded to the art of the period known as the ‘Dutch Golden Age’ from the seventeenth century to the present. We welcome case studies that reflect on, for example, theoretical appraisals of Dutch art and artists; literary adaptations of artists’ lives for the popular audience; print reproductions of Dutch painting in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; emulation of Dutch artists in nineteenth century France; the rediscovery of Vermeer; poetic responses to Dutch art; the changing reception of Rembrandt and other artists; Dutch art through the lens of methodologies such as feminism or post-colonialism; the collecting and connoisseurship of Dutch art in Canada and elsewhere; and other topics.

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Interconnections in the Long Nineteenth Century
Chairs: Mitchell Frank (Carleton University), mitchell.frank@carleton.ca; and Alison McQueen (McMaster University), ajmcq@mcmaster.ca

This panel invites papers that examine the significant roles assigned to visual culture in understanding global connections in the long nineteenth century (c.1789–1914). Connections between places and power relations raise important questions, and transnational approaches offer a means of disrupting histories, including those centred on national identities. Papers may consider the following questions: What roles did visual culture play in communicating, reinforcing, enacting, complicating, and/or disrupting imperial power structures and settler- colonial narratives? What issues of agency, or factors inhibiting agency, faced imperial subjects and/or citizens as creators, patrons, or spectators? How did they traverse or negotiate between geopolitical realms, such as the metropole, provinces, or colonies? How can the social history of art raise new questions about interconnections in the long nineteenth century? How does a transnational approach enrich and expand current conceptions of nineteenth-century art and reconceptualize its parameters? What does it promise and are there drawbacks?

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The Art of Camouflage
Chairs: Claudette Lauzon (Simon Fraser University), lauzon@sfu.ca; and T’ai Smith (University of British Columbia), tai.smith@ubc.ca

Camouflage is a technique of obfuscation that operates in the realm of visibility. Mimicking the patterns of its environment, an animal becomes at once transparent and opaque. A product of branding, the fashionista is constantly adapting, continuously changing and exchanging her appearance for another to fit the mode of her surroundings. The hoodie is at once a target, an icon of protest, and a method of hiding. Terrorists, sports fans, politicians, and bank robbers all wear baseball caps. Meanwhile, drones are disguised as hummingbirds. This panel will consider the art and politics of camouflage in material and online environments. We invite contributions that address camouflage from historical, theoretical, and/or artistic perspectives. Topics may include counter-surveillance and camouflage; the politics of race and opacity; camouflage in/and animal studies; visual cultures of war and conflict; costume and fashion; biometrics; and feminist strategies of invisibility.

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À la croisée des chemins : réflexions sur les relations interespèces en art
Chairs: Anne-Sophie Miclo (Université du Québec à Montréal), miclo.anne-sophie@courrier.uqam.ca; and Valérie Bienvenue (Université de Montréal), valerie.bienvenue@umontreal.ca

Si la part de l’animal non humain est considérable au sein du processus artistique, elle est cependant assez peu questionnée. Qu’il s’agisse de sa représentation, de sa présentation (vivant ou taxidermisé) ou encore de la composition même des œuvres (par le biais des colles, pinceaux et pigments), force est de constater que cet « autre » a maintes fois pris part à la création. Pourtant, son impact sur la relation humain/animal en art reste à reconnaître : comment les rapports interespèces sont-ils réfléchis par cette présence non humaine dans les œuvres? Par ailleurs, l’artiste qui « utilise » les animaux peut-il être vecteur de revendication ou de changement dans les façons d’interagir avec eux historiquement et maintenant? Ce panel, souhaitant ouvrir la question de l’animal en art à des angles d’approches des plus variés, invite à la réflexion à partir de n’importe quelles périodes historiques ou contextes culturels et géographiques.

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Environnements artificiels au 19e siècle (Séance du Réseau Art et Architecture du 19e siècle : RAA19)
Chairs: Étienne Morasse-Choquette (Université du Québec à Montréal), morasse-choquette.etienne@courrier.uqam.ca; and Christina Contandriopoulos (Université du Québec à Montréal), contandriopoulos.christina@uqam.ca

Le 19e siècle est marqué par l’instrumentalisation grandissante de la nature. Face à un monde devenu abstrait, l’art du paysage naturalise l’emprise sur le territoire en produisant des images fantasmatiques, sauvages ou primitivistes, alors que l’architecture émule les mécanismes de la nature par des moyens artificiels (jardins d’hiver, atmosphères contrôlées, éclairage artificiel, illusions spatiales). Si certaines tentatives relèvent d’intentions spirituelles ou purement poétiques, d’autres s’inscrivent dans une démarche rationaliste ou instrumentale. Dans tous les cas, l’expérience esthétique et l’imagination sont appelées à jouer un rôle de première importance. Cette séance invite les propositions d’études de cas variées et d’approches théoriques qui nous permettent de réfléchir à l’esthétisation de la nature durant le long 19e siècle. Qu’il s’agisse d’espaces ou d’images, comment les arts participent-ils à la création de « paradis terrestres » ou d’autres environnements artificiels ?

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The Art of Visualizing Others: Early Modern Cultural Encounters
Heather Muckart (Columbia College), muckart@mail.ubc.ca

The early modern period marks a moment of accelerated cultural contact, exchange, and trade. Despite this essential feature of the period, art historical studies that examine such encounters and the ways they were represented, negotiated, and understood though art and visual culture are only recently gaining traction. This session proposes to examine the representations that such encounters generated, as well as any preexisting works that informed such moments of contact. Papers are invited that examine one or more facets of this global network of early modern encounters and their related artworks and objects. Sites of contact can include, but are not limited to: the British Empire (including British America), First Nations, Ming or Qing China, Mughal or Maratha India, Safavid Persia, the Spanish Empire (including Spanish America), or the Venetian Republic. Papers that interrogate or challenge academic notions such as acculturation, appropriation, hybridity, and liminality are particularly encouraged.

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Artifacts and the Digital Archive
Barbara Rauch (OCAD University), brauch@faculty.ocadu.ca

This panel invites papers that address issues within the field of critical digital humanities. We will attend to contradictions and criticism in the field of digital humanities to further address the impact and politics of digital technologies on our diverse practices, i.e. art, design, craft, and media. While we have announced the era of the post-material, the post-digital, and the post-studio, contemporary practitioners find themselves returning to their studio, negotiating materiality, physical and digital that is, as we have declared data as material. Visualizing and/or materializing data, results in products; our objects demand exposure, documenting, and finally, storage. The boundary object, the hyper object, the emotive object all declare specific material research including the tacit knowledges that the maker inserts in the object. In particular, with digital objects and algorithmic work, the code that is embedded in the object is also an object, yet, how do we archive and narrate these distinct materials; we question further, does the digital archive provide for much diversity?

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Open Session: National Network for the Study and Promotion of Latino Canadian Art and Latin American Art in Canada
Chairs: Alena Robin (Western University), arobin82@uwo.ca; and Analays Hernandez (University of Ottawa), analays.alvarez@gmail.com

This open session welcomes proposals that seek to foster and disseminate knowledge in Canada of all aspects of Latino Canadian art and Latin American art, from pre-Columbian and colonial periods to modern and contemporary art. The objective of this session is to bring together collaborators and proposals for the creation of a national network for the study and promotion of Latino Canadian art and Latin American art in Canada. We accept proposals in French and English/Nous acceptons les propositions en français et en anglais.

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Museums and Celebrity Culture: Historical and Critical Perspectives
Chairs: Maria Silina (Université du Québec à Montréal), silina.maria@gmail.com; and Lynda Jessup (Queen’s University), lynda.jessup@queensu.ca

This session is a reflection on museums and the phenomenon of celebrity culture. Museums are institutions that channel celebrity culture as a part of the global creative industry and mass culture. Today, it is evidenced in the boom in blockbuster exhibitions and large-scale collaborations of museums with film and fashion industry. In history, too, exhibitions and artworks on display had already served as an attraction to the enlightened public. Museums are also celebrity institutions in their own right. There is an ongoing mutual interest between museum curators and celebrities from other cultural domains (Wes Anderson in Vienna, Beyoncé and Jay-Z at the Louvre). Finally, this evolution of museums raises new concerns for the strategic management (acquisition, public criticism) of artistic celebrities in museum collections in the time of the #MeToo movement, increasing calls to decolonize cultural institutions, and the vital importance of actively engaging underrepresented artists and communities into museums.

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Locating Textiles in Global Art Histories
Julia Skelly (Independent Scholar), julia.skelly232@gmail.com

In the introduction to Art History in the Wake of the Global Turn (2014), Aruna D’Souza writes that the book is meant to address some of the ways “that a global art history troubles, even explodes, the very concepts on which the discipline is based by forcing us to see differently, to recognize the unrecognizable, to authorize the formerly unacknowledged” (xxi). D’Souza’s words strike me as particularly resonant for the study of textiles. This session will highlight new scholarship on ‘global’ textiles, with ‘global’ signifying any location in the world not typically identified as an ‘art centre’. The objective of the session will be to demonstrate anew how we as art historians can ‘explode’ the very discipline of art history by rigorously studying textiles as well as makers from a range of global contexts. Papers may discuss textiles produced during any time period.

Seminar | Tim Clayton, Gillray in Grub Street

Posted in lectures (to attend) by Editor on May 16, 2019

James Gillray, Love in a Coffin, 1784
(The Lewis Walpole Library)

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From the Mellon Centre:

Tim Clayton, Gillray in Grub Street: Some Episodes from the 1780s
Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, 22 May 2019

James Gillray is known for working with Hannah Humphrey from her shop in St James’s Street, but Hannah did not become his dominant publisher until 1791 and they did not move to St James’s Street until 1797. For the first thirteen years of his adult working life Gillray had a number of publishers and at times worked on the margins of what was legally acceptable. This paper addresses some of Gillray’s work during the 1780s with a view to introducing for discussion issues that have proved problematic in the consideration of graphic satire, including authorship and origination, size of editions and prices, and legal sanctions against caricatures. The evening begins with the presentation of the paper at 6:00, followed by discussion and then drinks and nibbles at 7:30.

Tim Clayton is an author and historian who has worked chiefly on print history and military history. His book The English Print 1688–1802 (1997) sought to trace the growth and themes of the London print trade in the eighteenth century; more recent work has concentrated on graphic satire and literary propaganda in Bonaparte and the British: Prints and Propaganda in the Age of Napoleon (2015) and This Dark Business: The Secret War against Napoleon (2018). He is currently working on a book provisionally entitled ‘James Gillray and the Business of Satire’.

Call for Essays | Museum Media(ting)

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on May 16, 2019

From ArtHist.net:

Museum Media(ting): Emerging Technologies and Difficult Heritage
Edited by Theopisti Stylianou-Lambert, Antigone Heraclidou, and Alexandra Bounia

Abstracts due by 15 July 2019; finished essays due by 15 January 2020

This edited volume with the working title Museum Media(ting): Emerging Technologies and Difficult Heritage examines theoretical approaches and case studies that demonstrate how emerging technologies can display, reveal, and negotiate difficult, dissonant, negative, or undesirable heritage. We are particularly interested in how emerging technologies in museums have the potential to reveal unheard or silenced stories, challenge preconceptions, encourage emotional responses, introduce the unexpected, and overall provide alternative experiences. By emerging technologies, we refer to contemporary advances and innovations in technology such as virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, holograms, artificial intelligence, gamification, smart systems, etc.

How can museums, with the help of technology, manage to tell unheard stories, touch upon issues of difficult heritage, and narrate stories of unprivileged groups of people such as minorities, women, LGBT, immigrants, etc.? How can museums explore alternative sides of history, different from the political/ diplomatic/ military history which is the norm, such as social history, history of education, history of migration, etc., giving therefore emphasis not so much on the knowledge/ collection of information, but to multiperspectivity, inclusiveness, tolerance and social cohesion? How and to what extent the use of technology in museums/ art spaces, facilitates the understanding of issues dealing with contested history? How can emerging technologies provide not only cognitive experiences but also affective ones?

The volume may include chapters that deal with the following themes:
• Emerging technologies in museums
• Innovative interactive media/ installations
• Art and technology for difficult heritage
• Crowdsourcing/ participatory methods
• Oral histories and emerging technologies
• Deep mapping approaches
• Affective responses
• Cultural tourism and difficult or dark heritage
• Alternative experiences
• Evaluation studies of specific applications of emerging technologies applied to difficult heritage in museums
• Other themes related to the key questions of the call

The papers can be theoretical in nature or/ and explore specific case studies. We encourage proposals that demonstrate specific uses of emerging technologies in museums and other cultural sites as well as evaluation studies.

The volume will be edited by Theopisti Stylianou-Lambert (Cyprus University of Technology/ Research Centre on Interactive Media, Smart Systems and Emerging Technologies – RISE), Antigone Heraclidou (Research Centre on Interactive Media, Smart Systems and Emerging Technologies – RISE) and Alexandra Bounia (UCL Qatar/ University of the Aegean) and will be published by a well-known academic publisher.

To submit an abstract, please send a 500-word abstract (including references) and a short bio for each author (up to 70 words each) to theopisti.stylianou@cut.ac.cy and a.heraclidou@rise.org.cy by July 15th 2019. Applicants will receive a response within a month’s time. The selected authors will be expected to deliver a full paper (6000–8000 words) by January 15th 2020.

The Digital Piranesi

Posted in fellowships, opportunities, resources by Editor on May 15, 2019

Along with highlighting the project generally, this posting also aims to publicize a related two-year post-doc position (May 31 is the application due date).

The Digital Piranesi is a developing digital humanities project that aims to provide an enhanced digital edition of the works of Italian illustrator Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778). This project aims to make Piranesi’s views, maps, and texts accessible in a complete digital collection and, in an interactive digital edition, to make them visible, legible, and searchable in ways that the original works are not. The scale and breadth of Piranesi’s works require innovative methods of presentation, discovery, and analysis. By digitally illuminating and enacting many of the graphic features of his designs, this project will provide new ways of seeing this rare and complex historical material.

The University of South Carolina is one of fewer than ten institutions to hold a complete set of Piranesi’s posthumous Opere (1837–39), a set of twenty-nine elephant-folio volumes, housed in the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, that assembles all of his individual publications (such as Views of Rome and Imaginary Prisons). Alternatively historical and imaginative, Piranesi’s representations of ruins are exercises in rigorous archeological investigation as much as they are fanciful experiments in urban imagination. The Digital Piranesi aspires to appeal to these two elements of Piranesi’s own works—the historical and the imaginative—and to explore the ways that Piranesi’s works seem to predict many elements of digital design. His illustrations of ruins and crypts are immersive, his architectural studies often consist of multiple layered images, and his maps and ruins include detailed alphabetic keys. His indexed maps, annotated architectural studies, immersive interiors, and multi-image views push the limits of the printed page. While his earliest works were individual engravings of Roman ruins marketed towards visitors on the grand tour, he quickly began producing increasingly larger images and adding not only textual keys but also indices, prefaces, and dissertations. Pushing against the limits not only of the printed page but also of the bound book, his multi-plate engravings become elaborate foldouts in bound volumes, and the references in his maps and indices direct users through unnumbered pages and between different publications. His works are rare—his complete works are exceedingly so—and they constitute a colossal corpus with expansive pedagogical and scholarly potential lacking in any comprehensive searchable index. The Digital Piranesi aims to make the content and connections in this rich body of work easily accessible and searchable.

Piranesi’s architectural views and his referential networks require complex interactions with the spaces of the printed, illustrated book. These ways of interacting with print—tracing cross-references, ‘reading’ an image through its explanatory key—call for specific methods of preservation and display beyond producing digital images. The Digital Piranesi heeds this call by performing the links that Piranesi forges between maps, indices, and images; across unnumbered pages in multiple volumes; and within heavily-annotated engravings. Piranesi’s images are most frequently viewed individually, divorced from their original larger networks of cross-referencing. The digital environment, although it is unable to reproduce the materiality of his original works, offers a way of experiencing Piranesi’s works that is complementary to his vision. Digitally representing not only Piranesi’s images but also their interconnections, composite layers, and verbal references promises to reveal new insights about eighteenth-century Rome, the birth of art history as a discipline, and the graphical representation of knowledge.

With the support of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Division of Preservation and Access for 2019–21, the University of South Carolina is able to hire a postdoctoral fellow, who will contribute to the digital project’s ongoing development and assist in curating an exhibit to commemorate the tricentennial of Piranesi’s birth in the fall of 2020. The application deadline is 31 May 2019. More information is available here.

Call for Papers | Palaces for Rent: Real Estate in 18th-Century Rome

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on May 14, 2019

From the Call for Papers (which includes the Spanish version):

Palaces for Rent: Real Estate in 18th-Century Rome
Palacios en alquiler: Patrimonio inmobiliario en la Roma del siglo XVIII
Departamento de Historia del Arte, UNED, Madrid, 14–15 November 2019

Organized by Pilar Diez del Corral

Proposals due by 31 July 2019

This conference is developed within the frame of the research project Ramón y Cajal (2017-22131) devoted to “Artistic Academies, Diplomacy, and Identity of Spain and Portugal in Rome during the First Half of the 18th Century” (“Academias artísticas, diplomacia e identidad de España y Portugal en la Roma de la primera mitad del siglo XVIII”) by Dr Pilar Diez del Corral. The secondary aspect of the aforementioned project to be addressed is the accommodation problem that representatives of foreign countries encountered in Rome. The impact of this issue goes beyond the mere anecdote to affect diplomatic and logistical aspects of visitors’ time in Rome. From an art historical perspective this approach allows for the  study of the economic investment made by those people, the composition of their household from the staff to the material display, issues regarding restoration, construction plans, and other works in the palaces.

The conference aims to bring together scholars specializing in architecture, social history, decorative arts, and so on to explore the topic of Rome as a city of foreigners, who usually came to the city for church positions or to develop diplomatic or commercial missions that forced them to stay for long periods. The conference seeks to address the supply of palaces in Rome and the problems derived from the influence of high-ranking foreigners, who looked for accommodations fitting their dignity, and who in so many cases were forced to undertake significant works to prepare their new residences. Potential topics for discussion could include but are not limited to
• Roman palaces, construction aspects
• Internal organization of the palaces, spaces, and etiquette
• Decoration and internal design, magnificence, and display
• Roman households
• Ambassadors, legates, cardinals, and other representatives in Roman residences
• Topography of power and diplomacy
• Private and public spaces for the artistic creation within the palaces: academies, libraries, collections, intellectual gathering, theaters, etc.
• Economic issues such as problems relating to rents, non-payments, etc.

Please submit a one-page proposal (Word format) in Spanish or English (other European languages could be accepted) comprising title, abstract, and a short biographical note to palaciosromanos@gmail.com no later than 31 July 2019. The selected participants will be notified by 1 September. The conference outcomes might be followed by the publication of a collective work, subject to peer-review and selection depending on the quality and innovation of the papers.

Scientific Direction
Pilar Diez del Corral Corredoira (UNED, Madrid)

Scientific committee
Diana Carrió-Invernizzi (Dpto. Historia del Arte, UNED, Madrid)
Angela Cipriani (former director of the Archivio Storico di San Luca, Rome)
Almudena Negrete Plano (Europaschule Friedensburg Oberschule, Berlin)
Álvaro Pascual Molina (Dpto. Historia del Arte, UNED, Madrid)
Carlos Pena Buján (independent scholar, Madrid)

Conference | Collecting and Display: A Matter of Access

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on May 13, 2019

From H-ArtHist:

Collecting and Display: A Matter of Access
Munich, 22 June 2019; and London, 24 June 2019

Organized by Susan Bracken, Andrea Gáldy, and Adriana Turpin

Since its foundation in 2004, the international forum Collecting & Display has investigated numerous aspects of both collections and collectors. Such activity has taken place at regular seminars and at our conferences and has resulted in a number of publications. For June 2019 we plan an international conference at two venues: Munich (22nd) and London (24th). Speakers and attendees are welcome to book either part of the conference separately or both as a package. The 2019 conference aims to extend the discussion of the nature and pertinence of collections by focusing on the spaces in which they were displayed and how access to those spaces was controlled. By examining how collections were displayed, used and presented, and who had access to these spaces, we hope to develop a deeper understanding of the meaning of collections to their owners and of their significance to contemporaries.

S A T U R D A Y ,  2 2  J U N E  2 0 1 9

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Room 007, Zentnerstr. 31, 80798 München

10.00  Registration and welcome

10.30  Morning Talks
• Orsolya Bubriák (Institute of Art History, Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences), The Kunstkammer of Johann Septimius Jörger in Nuremberg
• Virginie Spenlé (Director, Kunstkammer Georg Laue Inventarisierung und wissenschaftliche Bearbeitung des Bestandes), Leonhard Christoph Sturm (1669–1719) and an Ideal Architecture for Dynastic Collections
• Mary Malloy (Fellow of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University), The Catalogue as Invitation: Recruiting Visitors to Collections in Seventeenth-Century Europe
• Catherine Phillips (Independent Scholar), Paintings, Prints, Squirrels, and Monkeys: Catherine the Great’s Hermitage

1.00  Lunch

2.00  Afternoon Talks
• Paweł Ignaczak (Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw), A Parisian Collection in a Polish Castle: Lights and Shadows of a Prestigious Location in the Context of the Struggle for National Identity
• Cecilia Riva (Collection Cataloguer, Palazzo Ducale, Venice), ‘A Well-known Subject for Photographic Reproduction’: The Layard Collection as an Example of Nineteenth-Century Advertising
• Sarah Coviello (Warburg Institute, London), ‘A scholar collects, exhibits, and writes about it’: The Personal Study Collections of Twentieth-Century Art Historians
• Maria Höger (Department für Kunst- und Kulturwissenschaften der Donau-Universität Krems, Art / Brut Center Gugging), ‘Art Brut’ and ‘Outsider Art’ – ‘Ghettoization’ of Art and Their Creators?
• Laura Humphreys (Curatorial Project Manager at the Science Museum in London), New Frontiers for the Science Museum Group Collection

5:30  Drinks reception

M O N D A Y ,  2 4  J U N E  2 0 1 9

IHR, Senate House, Wolfson Room, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

9.30  Registration

9.45  Welcome and introduction

10.00  Morning Talks
• Anne Harbers (Radboud University, The Netherlands), His & Her Royal Collections: The Synergies and Symbiosis of Selecting a Publicity Channel
• Esmee Quodbach (Assistant Director of the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library), To See or Not to See: The Visibility of the John G. Johnson Collection in Philadelphia, c.1880 to the Present
• Julia Rössel (Research Assistant in the project ‘Kupferstichkabinett Online’ of the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel), Displaying Print Collections: Location, Site, Practice
• Anne Nellis Richter (Adjunct Professorial Lecturer, Department of Art, American University, Washington DC), ‘An Excess of Folly’: Townhouses as Public Art Galleries in Early Nineteenth-Century London
• Isobel Caroline MacDonald (University of Glasgow and The Burrell Collection), A Private Collection on Public Display: The Significance of (Sir) William Burrell’s (1861–1958) Loan Collection

1.00  Lunch

2:00  Afternoon Talks
• Alison Clarke (University of Liverpool and the National Gallery, London), In a Better Light: Agnew’s, Spatiality, and Connoisseurial Practice, c.1875–1916
• Rebecca Tilles (Associate Curator of 18th-Century French and Western European Fine and Decorative Arts at Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens), The Homes and Collecting Display of Marjorie Merriweather Post
• Laia Anguix (Northumbria University-Department of Arts), ‘In Deplorable Conditions and Totally Inadequate for the Housing of the Collections’: Storage, Conservation, and Access in Public Collections, The Case of the Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle
• Megakles Rogakos (The American College of Greece), The Work of an ACG Art Curator

5.00  Drinks reception

Call for Articles | Africa: Trade, Traffic, and Collections

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on May 13, 2019

From H-ArtHist:

Journal for Art Market Studies, Special Issue on “Africa: Trade, Traffic and Collections,” Guest Edited by Felicity Bodenstein
Planned for December 2019

Abstracts due by 7 June 2019; accepted articles due by 15 September 2019

Felicity Bodenstein will be guest editor of our upcoming issue on the subject of “Africa: Trade, Traffic and Collections,” provisional publication date December 2019. We would like to explore the history of trade in artefacts from Africa, including mechanisms controlling the movement of objects, campaigns against illegal transfers, and the role of provenance in the creation of market value.

The following research subjects may serve as impulses for contributions to the issue:
• The early history of trade in African objects from the eighteenth century onwards
• Concepts of value and price development in the market for ‘ethnographic’ objects from Africa
• Trade, theft, and trophy enterprises in African objects (for example through analysis of market types, acquisitions, and provenance)
• Campaigns against illegal trade and transfers from a historical perspective
• The role of the art trade in creating diasporas of objects from Africa
• The formation of African artefact collections, be it private or public
• The relationship between museum collections and the market for African objects, with special focus on actors, agents, and networks of the trade in African artefacts
• Research into the history of collecting African objects that arrived in the West through trade intermediaries, triggered by economic, political, or war-related events
• Case studies that highlight trade actors and networks in African objects

Since 2017 the Institute for Art History and Historical Urban Studies at Technische Universität Berlin has been publishing the Open Access Journal for Art Market Studies (JAMS). Under the auspices of the Institute’s well-established Forum Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies, the publication presents interdisciplinary research results on past and present art markets. The Journal conforms to Open Access standards including website submission and peer reviews. It is also registered on the DOAJ database. Articles are published both as pdf and in HTML format, they are DOI-registered and usually subject to a CC BY-NC copyright license.

Please submit your abstract for an article by 7 June 2019 to s.meyer-abich@tu-berlin.de.

Deadline abstract (2,000 characters/ 400 words): 7 June 2019
Deadline article (30,000 characters/ 6,000 words): 15 September 2019

Clark Fellowship in Digital Art History, Fall 2020

Posted in fellowships by Editor on May 13, 2019

From H-ArtHist:

Clark Fellowship in Digital Art History
Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, Fall 2020

Applications due by 15 October 2019

This fellowship supports a residency at the Clark Art Institute of one semester for a scholar at any stage of their career involved in a project that is either born-digital or has a substantial component that exists outside the publishing model of the monographic book. The project should contain not only a digital component but also a critical awareness of the methodological possibilities, problems, and questions in applying digital methods to art history today. This fellowship is particularly aimed at scholars working on material that is pre-1900.

The Clark Art Institute combines a public art museum with a complex of research and academic programs, including a major art history library. The Clark is an international center for discussion on the nature of art and its history. Fellowships are awarded every year to established and promising scholars with the aim of fostering a critical commitment to inquiry in the theory, history, and interpretation of art and visual culture. In addition to providing an opportunity for sustained research for fellows, outside of their usual professional obligations, the Clark encourages them to participate in a variety of collaborative and public discussions on diverse art historical topics as well as on larger questions and motivations that shape the practice of art history. For more information please visit the website. Applicants are required to complete an online application form. All materials must be submitted in English.

At Christie’s | Masterpieces from a Rothschild Collection

Posted in Art Market by Editor on May 12, 2019

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Dans les blés
(estimate: £700,000–1 million)

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

From the press release (via Art Daily) . . .

Masterpieces from a Rothschild Collection (Sale 17726)
Christie’s, London, 4 July 2019

Telling the remarkable story of objects collected across centuries and treasured for generations, Christie’s will offer a landmark collection sale Masterpieces from a Rothschild Collection in London on 4 of July (Sale 17726). Comprising approximately 57 lots—each with exceptional provenance—this sale includes important European furniture and works of art collected by members of the prominent Rothschild banking family, particularly by Baron Gustave de Rothschild (1829–1911), and housed in some of the family’s magnificent residences.

The sale captures the spirit of le goût Rothschild—the celebrated aesthetic that has influenced many European and American interiors since the 19th century, following the collecting traditions of European royal courts during the Renaissance, Baroque, and Enlightenment periods. With estimates ranging from £10,000 to £2.5 million, select highlights will be on view in New York between 25 and 30 April and in Hong Kong from 24 to 27 May, followed by the London preview which opens to the public on 29 June.

Charles Cator, Deputy Chairman, Christie’s International: “The Rothschild name is synonymous with collecting at the very highest level, with many of the world’s greatest works of art having a Rothschild provenance. Their fabled name is added to the extraordinary roll call of illustrious owners of these masterpieces—many of them royal—from Louis XV and Marie Antoinette to William Beckford and Prince Demidoff. This sale is a celebration of connoisseurship and passionate collecting, and we are very proud to have been entrusted with these masterpieces. With the great resonance of the Rothschild provenance among collectors and institutions this is an unparalleled opportunity, which marks a very special high point in my long career at Christie’s. It is thrilling to have the privilege of handling these supreme works.”

Highlights include

Furniture with Royal Provenance

One of a pair of royal Flemish tortoiseshell, brass, pewter, inlaid ‘boulle’ marquetry, and giltwood cabinets attributed to Hendrick van Soest, Antwerp, ca. 1713 (estimate: £1.5–2.5million).

The top lot of the sale, a pair of royal Flemish tortoiseshell, brass, and pewter inlaid marquetry and giltwood cabinets, was commissioned in Antwerp around 1713 for Philip V King of Spain, the second son of the Grand Dauphin and grandson of Louis XIV (estimate: £1.5–2.5 million). This highly important pair of cabinets on stand, inlaid with superb and precious marquetry panels in tortoiseshell and engraved metals, belongs to a group of four cabinets originally commissioned for Philip V King of Spain from the workshop of the celebrated Antwerp furniture-maker and dealer Henrick Van Soest (1659–after 1726), one of the most prestigious cabinetmakers of Flanders who worked in the great tradition of Netherlandish marquetry furniture.

Commissioned by Queen Marie Antoinette of France, almost certainly for her Petit Trianon, a Louis XVI ormolu-mounted mahogany table à écrire, circa 1780, is by Jean-Henri Riesener, the Queen’s favoured cabinetmaker (estimate: £600,000–1,000,000). Notably, the table is marked with Marie Antoinette’s garde-meuble brand, which was applied to her personal furniture after 1784.

Further lots with royal provenance include a sundial by Julien Le Roy (1686–1759), which is thought to have been commissioned by King Louis XV (1710–1774) (estimate: £60,000–80,000).

Traditionally from the Spanish royal family and part of a very small group of luxurious 18th-century furniture incorporating Sèvres porcelain plaques is a Louis XVI ormolu, Sèvres porcelain and marquetry guéridon, circa 1782–83, by one of the most famous ébénistes of the late 18th century, Martin Carlin (estimate: £400,000–600,000). Acquired by Baron Gustave de Rothschild, this lot is closely related to a guéridon in The Frick Collection. Other lots with notable links to leading institutions include a magnificent late Louis XV ormolu-mounted ebony and Japanese lacquer ensemble consisting of two commodes and a pair of encoignures by Bernard III van Risenburgh, son of the celebrated master known as BVRB. Conceived in a bold avant-gardist neo-classical style, the commodes from this group are closely related to the masterpiece by the same ébéniste now at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The group comprises three lots with a combined estimate of £1,500,000 to £2,500,000.

Kunstkammer Objects

A set of ten parcel-gilt polychrome square enamel plaques by Leonard Limousin, circa 1550, each depicting an apostle in a circular wreath and with an identifying banner, have an estimate of £200,000 to £300,000. Also acquired by Baron Gustave de Rothschild, ‘The Rothschild Apostles’ exemplify Limousin’s finest creations in his clear sense of colour and the lively and original compositions. Two of the plaques, of Saint Andrew and Saint Bartholomew, are signed ‘LL’. These plaques formed part of a larger set of sibyls, prophets, and saints that adorned the antependium of an altar in the now-lost church of Santa Maria della Celestia in Venice. A number of the other plaques from the antependium, and also a liturgical lamp that hung above the altar, remained in the Rothschild family until recently; one is in the Correr Museum in Venice.

An important German silver-gilt double-cup, mark of Hans Beutmuller, Nuremberg, 1594–1602, was in the collections of both Baron Mayer Carl von Rothschild and Baroness James de Rothschild (estimate: £200,000–300,000). It is in the Gothic style revived in Nuremberg by Hans Petzold (1551–1633) at the end of the 16th century. Hans Beutmüller (1588–1622) worked with Petzold and ranked, in his own right, among the most reputable Nuremberg goldsmiths. A Venetian rectangular parcel-gilt, gilt-bronze, and rock crystal casket, circa 1600, belonged to the renowned collector and author William Beckford in the early 19th century (estimate: £100,000–150,000). With the precious use of rock crystal and Islamic-inspired lacquer decoration, it is obvious why it would have appealed to Beckford. When this casket was sold in the celebrated Fonthill Abbey sale of 1823, it was said to have come from the collection of Pope Paul V Borghese, who could have commissioned it himself. The casket was purchased at the Fonthill sale by an agent on behalf of the 2nd Earl Grosvenor.

Old Master Paintings

David Teniers’ lively and brilliantly observed The Ham Dinner was painted in 1648, when the artist was at the height of his powers (estimate: £800,000–1.2 million). Executed on an impressively large copper plate, allowing for a high degree of finish, it is an excellent example of the tavern scene genre that Teniers developed and excelled in. The painting has exceptional provenance, having been in the collection of Charles Ferdinand, Duke of Berry (1778–1820), son of the future King Charles X of France, and later belonging to Count Anatoly Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), a Russian industrialist and one of the most significant collectors of his day. A further highlight is Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s dynamically designed, vibrantly coloured, and masterfully executed Dans les blés (estimate: £700,000–1 million), a masterpiece of the artist’s full maturity and an outstanding example of the artist’s intimate, small-scale ‘boudoir’ pictures, which are recognised as his most original and lasting contribution to the history of art.