Enfilade

ASECS 2022, Baltimore

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on March 24, 2022

Baltimore’s Inner Harbor
(Photo by Patrick Gillespie, September 2016; Wikimedia Commons)

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From ASECS:

2022 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor, 31 March — 2 April 2022

The 52nd annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies takes place in Baltimore. HECAA will be represented by the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Aaron Wile and Dipti Khera and scheduled for Thursday afternoon. HECAA’s annual business meeting will take place online in advance of the conference on March 25. A selection of 30 additional panels is included below (of the 172 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full slate of offerings, see the program.

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T H U R S D A Y , 3 1  M A R C H  2 0 2 2

Time and Temporality
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am, Key 1
Chair: Craig HANSON, Calvin University
1. Helena YOO ROTH, CUNY, “The Many Deaths of George II and Colonial Time Consciousness”
2. Stuart SHERMAN, Fordham University, “‘Unknown to All the Rest’: the Play of Time in Restoration Prologues and Epilogues”
3. Alexander CREIGHTON, Harvard University, “Tristram Shandy’s Variations on Habit”

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How ‘Byzantine’ was the Eighteenth Century? New Insights on the Christian Orthodox Art and Architecture of the Late Ottoman Empire, Part I
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am, Paca
Chair: Demetra VOGIATZAKI, Harvard University and Nikolaos MAGOULIOTIS, ETH Zurich/gta
1. Alper METIN, Università Sapienza di Roma, “Reflections of the So-called Ottoman Baroque on the 18th-Century Orthodox Buildings: Towards the Emergence of a New Imperial Architectural Synthesis?”
2. Theocharis TSAMPOURAS, University of Western Macedonia / Greek Ministry of Culture (Ephorate of Antiquities of Kozani), “Artists and Patrons Changing the Norms of Post-Byzantine Painting in the Eighteenth-Century-Ottoman Balkans”

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Skin & Bone: Animal Substrates
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am, Pickersgill
Chair: Sarah GRANDIN, The Clark Art Institute
1. Katherine FEIN, Columbia University, “Cracks in the Ivory: The Violence of Portrait Miniatures”
2. Catherine GIRARD, St. Francis Xavier University, “Forms of Erasure: Theorizing Reuses of Indigenous Beaver-Pelt Coats in European Hats”
3. Marianne VOLLE, York University/Glendon College & Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne, “Flora Meets Fauna: A Reflection on the Use of Vellum for Botanical Illustrations at the Jardin du Roi”

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How ‘Byzantine’ was the Eighteenth Century? New Insights on the Christian Orthodox Art and Architecture of the Late Ottoman Empire, Part II
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Paca
Chair: Demetra VOGIATZAKI, Harvard University and and Nikolaos MAGOULIOTIS, ETH Zurich/gta
1. Alexandra COURCOULA, MIT, “Ottoman Ecclesiastical Objects in the Benaki Museum: Shaping Greek National Historiography and Perceptions of Ottoman Art”
2. Maria GEORGOPOULOU, Gennadius Library, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, “Center and Periphery in the Ottoman Balkans: The Cultural Heritage of Ottoman, Turkish, Post-Byzantine and Greek Monuments”
3. Cosmin MINEA, ETH Zurich, “Writings about Romanian Art in the Late 19th Century and the Rise of the Brâncovenesc Heritage as National Style”

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Materials of Global Trade: Networks, Mobility, and Transformation
Thursday, 9:45–11:15, Key 5
Chair: Jennifer GERMANN, Independent Scholar
1. Tara ZANARDI, Hunter College, CUNY, “Bittersweet Empire: Alcora, Natural History, and the Chocolate Service”
2. Emily Rose BEEBER, University of Delaware, “Rubens Peale with a Geranium: Botanical Science and Slavery in the Early Republic”
3. Christina LINDEMAN, University of South Alabama, “Vermilion and Cinnabar: Seeing Red in Eighteenth-Century Europe”

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Spreading the Image: Print Cultures
Thursday, 11:30–1:00, Key 10
Chair: Susanne ANDERSON-RIEDEL, University of New Mexico
1. Michael FEINBERG, University of Wisconsin, Madison, “Flaming Landscapes in Stedman’s Narrative of a five year expedition”
2. Arthur LEE, Johns Hopkins University, “Illustrating the Haitian Revolution: Marcus Rainsford and Atlantic Visual Politics”
3. Ruth DAWSON, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, “Picturing an Upstart Tsarina for a Downmarket Audience: Early Prints of Catherine the Great”

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Objects and the Making of Enlightenment Selves
Thursday, 11:30–1:00, Paca
Chair: Mary PEACE, Sheffield Hallam University, and Joelle DEL ROSE, College for Creative Studies
1. Sara WHISNANT, East Tennessee University, “‘The Sense of Taste’: Agency and Identity in Eighteenth-Century Group Portraiture”
2. Katherine ISELIN, University of Missouri, “Women and Eighteenth-Century Antiquarianism”
3. Lauren KELLOGG DISALVO, Dixie State University, “Women and Eighteenth-Century Antiquarianism”
4. Mary CRONE-ROMANOVSKI, Florida Gulf Coast University, “The Circulation of Material Objects In and Across Novels by Women”

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Gale Digital Scholar Lab, Lunch and Learn
Thursday, 1:00–2:15, Tubman B
Gale invites ASECS members to a lunch conversation about Gale Digital Scholar Lab, a text and data mining and visualization tool built specifically for primary sources. Using the analysis tools in the Lab, researchers can explore topics and patterns across collections including ECCO. During the session, Gale will provide an overview of the tool and case studies of how it’s been used in teaching and research at institutions around the world. Register at: https://forms.gle/hTMhLKirWMXm4usTA

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Anne Schroder New Scholars Session (HECAA)
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Key 12
Chair: Aaron WILE, National Gallery of Art, and Dipti KHERA, New York University
1. Zoë DOSTAL, Columbia University, “From Idle to Industrious: Picturing Women Beating Hemp in the Bridewell”
2. Anna FICEK, CUNY Graduate Center, “From Print to Parlor: Les Incas’ Long Shadow in Visual and Decorative Arts”
3. Jinyi LIU, New York University, “Seaborne Craftsmen and Their Elastic Workshop Knowledge: An Eighteenth-Century Fujianese-made Sculpture of Mourning Mary”
4. Ankita SRIVASTAVA, Jawaharlal Nehru University, “The Architect and the Marchese: Two Italians at the Court of Begum Samru of Sardhana, India”

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Seen Here Making a Masterpiece: Rendering Artists, Musicians, and Authors in Painting, Poetry, Sculpture, and Prose [South-Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies]
Thursday, 2:30–4:00, Douglass
Chair: TBD
1. Bradford MUDGE, University of Colorado, Denver, “Transmediation and Portraiture”
2. Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College, “Picturing Artists and Writers: Media Specificity, Genre and Cultural Mythmaking”
3. Kevin L. COPE, Louisiana State University, “My Easel Just Fell into an Abysm and I’m under a Tidal Wave: Picturing Earthquake Experiencers”

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Performing the Eighteenth Century Today
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Key 2
Chair: Ellen WELCH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1. Olivia SABEE, Swarthmore College, “Eighteenth-Century Performance Theory and Twenty-First Century Performance: Diderot, Noverre, The Noble, and the Grotesque”
2. Amanda MOEHLENPAH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Foreign and Familiar: Cultural Codes and Affective Performance in Eighteenth-Century Ballet”
3. Meredith MARTIN, New York University, “Reimagining the Ballet des Porcelaines: Commerce, Colonialism, and Chinoiserie”

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Reproduction and Futurity, Part I
Thursday, 4:15–5:45, Key 9
Chair: Jane WESSEL, U.S. Naval Academy
1. Kirsten MARTIN, Rutgers University, “‘A Kind of Magick’: Imitation and Futurity in Sir Joshua Reynolds’s Pedagogy”
2. Laura EARLS,University of Delaware, “‘They could hardly persuade themselves they were not human creatures’: Women Waxwork Sculptors and Reproduction in the British Atlantic World”
3. Chelsea PHILLIPS, Villanova University, “Conceiving Genius: Sarah Siddons and the Future of Tragedy”

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Members’ Reception
Thursday, 6:00–7:30, Eutaw Street (Weather Permitting)

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Eighteenth-Century Game Night
Thursday, 7:30–midnight, Key 12
An open house to explore games inspired by the eighteenth century. For more information or to sign up for games, see http://aub.ie/asecs22games. Game Night also will be held on Friday, April 1.

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F R I D A Y ,  1  A P R I L  2 0 2 2

The Eighteenth-Century Last Will and Testament, Part I
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Douglass
Chair: Pamela PHILLIPS, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras
1. Yvonne FUENTES, University of West Georgia, “Spanish Testaments, Wills, and Inventories: Bridging Heaven and Earth”
2. Melanie HAYES, Trinity College Dublin, “Crafted Legacies: Artisans’ Wills in Early Georgian Britain”
3. Stephanie KOSCAK, Wake Forest University, “‘Tokens of My Love’: Money, Memory, and Mourning in Eighteenth-Century England”
4. Emily ENGEL, Independent Scholar, “Portraits and Luxury in Eighteenth-Century South America”

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Let’s Get Small: Micro-Art Histories, Part I
Friday, 9:45–11:15, Key 6
Chair: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida
1. Rori BLOOM, University of Florida, “Miniature Portraits as Erotic Currency in Casanova’s Histoire de ma vie”
2. Jeff RAVEL, MIT, “An Eye on Theatrical Disorder: France and England, ca. 1800”
3. Yasemin ALTUN, Duke University, “Original-itty in Translation: Sophie Chéron’s Creative Reproduction of Miniature Gems”

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Presidential Session | Venice: Real and Imagined
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Key 12
Chair: Irene ZANINI-CORDI, Florida State University
1. Rebecca SQUIRES, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, “Vedute of Venice: The Visual Construction of the Picturesque”
2. John HUNT, Utah Valley University, “Imaginary Hells: Witches and Magic Wells in Early Modern Venice”
3. Susan DALTON, Université de Montréal, “Venice’s Amazon? Giustina Renier Michiel’s Strategic Accommodations of Occupying Forces”
The panel will begin with a performed reading: “Giustina Renier Michiel’s and Chateaubriand’s Views on Venice,” presented by Aleksondra HULTQUIST, Stockton University, and Sayre GREENFIELD, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. *This reading is supported by the Arts, Theater, and Music Fund*

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Curious Taste: The Transatlantic Appeal of Satire
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Paca
Chair: Nancy SIEGEL, Towson University
1. Cynthia ROMAN, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, “Museums ‘Look down on Them’ Librarians ‘Don’t Know How to Handle Them.’ The Layered Histories of Scholarship and Collecting of Eighteenth-Century British Satiric Prints at the Lewis Walpole Library”
2. Rebecca SZANTYR, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, “Compiling Singularities: Alexander Anderson’s The Wheel of Fortune”
3. Allison STAGG, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany, “Charles Pierce’s Album of Caricatures”

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Let’s Get Small: Micro-Art Histories, Part II
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Key 6
Chair: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida
1. Aoife COSGROVE, Trinity College Dublin, “Isabel Farnesio, Amateur: A Small-Scale Artist in a Big World”
2. Philippe HALBERT, Yale University, “Rouge, Redress, and the Sauvage: Reading Madame Bégon as Microhistory 1748–1753”
3. Ashley HANNEBRINK, Harvard University, “Small Sculptures, Big Ideas: Terracotta Statuettes and Theories of the Earth in Eighteenth-Century Paris”

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Conversations across the Arts: Adaptations
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Key 12
Chair: Daniella BERMAN, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU and Ashley BENDER, Texas Women’s University
1. Bethany E. QUALLS, University of California, Davis, “Sally Salisbury’s Eighteenth- Century Transmedia Adaptations and the Creation of B-List Celebrity”
2. Hamish WOOD, University of Sydney, “Adaptation, Epistolarity, and Staging the Letter: Jane Austen’s ‘Sir Charles Grandison or the happy man. A comedy’ (c.1800)”
3. Kathryn DESPLANQUE, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Starving Artists? The Presence and Absence of Women in Parisian Art-World Satire in the Long Eighteenth Century”

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Clothing and Empire: Dress and Power
Friday, 11:30–1:00, Douglass
Chair: Kristin, O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College
1. Marina KLIGER, Metropolitan Museum of Art, “A Turk at the Paris Salon: The Ambiguities of Dress and Cosmopolitanism in Jean-Baptiste Isabey’s Le Grand escalier du musée (1817)”
2. Jacqueline DELISLE, independent researcher, “The Straight-Edge Razor as a Tool of Masculine Self-Fashioning”
3. Nancy KARRELS, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, “Fashionable Loot: Female Influencers in Revolutionary France’s Cultural Heritage Debates”
4. Christine ADAMS, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, “Fashion and Politics: Élégantes and Merveilleuses under the Directory and Beyond”

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Lunches, Excursions, and Late-Breaking Special Sessions
Friday, 1:00–3:15
Use this time to explore Baltimore’s eighteenth-century history, connect with colleagues, or just take a breather amid our busy agenda!
Excursions: Except when noted, these are suggestions for members to organize on their own.
Guide to Indigenous Baltimore (self-guided walking tour created by American University faculty member, Elizabeth Rule)
Baltimore African American Heritage Walking Tour (self-guided walking tour)
Baltimore Black History Tour (guided walking tour run by Black-owned business, I Love Baltimore Personal Tours)
Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture
• Not exactly an excursion: but this an interesting digital resource: Visualizing Early Baltimore (batch of digital resources at UMBC, including BEARINGS of Baltimore, ca. 1815, an interactive 3D map that allows overlay of contemporary onto 1815 Baltimore)
• Walters Art Museum Guided Tour (capacity limited to 30; already full). On this two-stop private tour for ASECS members at the Walters Art Museum, Joaneath Spicer, the James A. Murnaghan Curator of European Renaissance and Baroque Art, will talk about two subjects for which she is well known: first, the presence and representation of Africans in Europe, specifically the museum’s newly acquired portrait of an African prince at the court of Louis XIV; and second, the Chamber of Wonders and its shifting character from the early 1600s to the 1700s.

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Flames of Freedom Showcase
Friday, 2:00–3:15, Key 12
Emily Friedman, Emily Kugler, and Sören Hammerschmidt will offer a brief introduction to Flames of Freedom, a table-top role-playing game that blends historical setting and folk horror genres with a deep commitment to diversity and equity in gaming, game design, and the broader community—followed by a hands-on showcase of the game’s approach to race, ethnicity, class, gender, disability, and other consideration in the character generation process. Those interested in playing the game can sign up for sessions on Thursday and Friday night, at http://aub.ie/asecs22games.

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Baltimore Museum of Art, HECAA Visit
Friday, 3:30–6:00
HECAA member Brittany Luberda, Assistant Curator of Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art, has been kind enough to organize a HECAA-only tour of the museum’s eighteenth-century collections on Friday afternoon. Virginia Anderson, Curator of American Art, will be leading a tour of the early American galleries, and Brittany herself will offer a walk-through of the eighteenth-century European galleries. The tours are followed by an informal social hour at the museum bar starting at 5:00. Space is limited, so advanced registration for this event is required (see the HECAA email for details).

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ASECS Business Meeting / Presentation of ASECS Awards
Friday, 3:15–5:00, Key 7 & 8
Rebecca MESSBARGER, ASECS President, Mark BOONSHOFT, ASECS Executive Director, Joseph BARTOLOMEO, ASECS Treasurer

ASECS Presidential Address
Friday, 3:15–5:00, Key 7 & 8
Rebecca MESSBARGER Washington University in St. Louis, “Demystifying the Corpse in Italy’s Age of Reform”

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Eighteenth-Century Game Night
Friday, 7:00–midnight, Key 12
An open house to explore games inspired by the eighteenth century. For more information or to sign up for games, see http://aub.ie/asecs22games. Game Night also will be held on Thursday.

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S A T U R D A Y ,  2  A P R I L  2 0 2 2

Transplanted Lives and Foreign Presence: Seeing Migration
Saturday, 9:45–11:15, Key 5
Chair: Marina KLIGER, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Thea GOLDRING, Harvard University
1. Harvey Guy SHEPHERD, The Courtauld Institute of Art, “Alpine Identity in Transit: The Visual Culture of Savoyard Migrants in Eighteenth-Century Paris”
2. Oliver WUNSCH, Boston College, “The Limits of Visual Sensitivity: Sympathy, Sensibility, and Jean-Baptiste Perronneau’s Portrait of Mapondé”
3. Daniel O’QUINN, University of Guelph, “Between Superlunary and Sublunary Worlds: Muslims in the Metropolis of London”

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Trying to Earn Some Dosh: Chasing Economic and Professional Success in the in the Atlantic World
Saturday, 9:45–11:15, Key 10
Chair: Heather ZUBER, Queens College, CUNY and Amanda SPRINGS, Maritime College, SUNY
1. Christine WALKER, Yale-NUS College “‘I will not leave my affairs in any other hand:’ Women’s Trans-Atlantic Crossings and Caribbean Interests”
2. Heidi STROBEL, University of North Texas, “Mary Linwood’s Balancing Act”
3. Sonja LAWRENSON, Manchester Metropolitan University, “‘A World of New Wonders Shall Open on You’: Maria Edgeworth and Transatlantic Exchange”
4. Sarah CARTER, McGill University, “Artists, Antiquaries, and the Cosmopolitan Career of John Brown”

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The 38th James L. Clifford Memorial Lecture
Jennifer L. MORGAN, New York University, “On Race and Reinscription: Writing Enslaved Women into the Early Modern Archive”
Saturday, 11:30–12:30, Key 7 & 8
In this talk, Jennifer Morgan uses the history of three Black women from the sixteenth and seventeenth century to explore questions of methodology and evidence in the early history of the Black Atlantic. Through evidence from visual art, law, and commerce Morgan considers the challenges and possibilities of crafting a social historical study of women whose voices are so often absent from the archival record but whose lives and perspectives have proven to be essential for comprehending the origins of racial capitalism.

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Arts of the Table in Global Perspective
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Key 9
Chair: Sarah R. COHEN, SUNY University at Albany
1. Ralph HOYLE, Independent Scholar, “The English Tea as Global Consumption”
2. Alicia CATICHA, Northwestern University, “Material Masquerade: Sugar and Marble on the Eighteenth-Century Dining Table”
3. Jacob MYERS, University of Pennsylvania, “The Cane-Rat, Delicacy, and Archival Stickiness on British Jamaica”
4. Susan B. EGENOLF, Texas A&M University, “Soup Tureens and Global Politics: Josiah Wedgwood’s Green Frog Service”

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Materializing Time and Temporality
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Brent
Chair: Helena YOO ROTH, CUNY
1. Alexandra MACDONALD, William & Mary, “No Time to Dye: Gendered Labour in Eighteenth-Century Craft”
2. Craig HANSON, Calvin University, “The History and Present State of Before and After, The Origins of a Visual Convention”
3. Daniella BERMAN, NYU, “Uncertainty and Time: The Problem of Representing the French Revolution”

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Geographical Frontiers
Saturday, 2:00–3:30, Paca
Chair: Matthew GIN, Northeastern University
1. Zoe BEENSTOCK, University of Haifa, “Shifting Sands: Thomas Pownall’s Colonial Antiquarianism”
2. Laura GOLOBISH, University of New Mexico, “Piss, Poison, Potions, and other Paths from Scotland to England in London Caricature after 1745”
3. Emily CASEY, Independent Scholar, “Hydrographic Frontiers: Imagining Land and Sea in the Early Nation”
4. Nika ELDER, American University, “John Singleton Copley’s Watson and the Shark and the Whitewashing of History”

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Who Run(s) the World? Girl Culture in the Long Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Key 9
Chair: Maura GLEESON, Valencia College, and Lauren WALTER, University of Florida
1. Nicole M. STAHL, West Virginia University, “The Girl in the Book: Anna Seward and Her Literary Forefathers”
2. Fiona BRIDEOAKE, American University, “Girls Narrating Girlhood in The Governess: or, The Little Female Academy”
3. Amanda STRASIK, Eastern Kentucky University, “Painting Paradoxes: Jeanne-Elisabeth Chaudet’s Little Girl Teaching her Dog to Read

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Portraiture in the Americas
Saturday, 3:45–5:15, Armistead
Chair: Emily THAMES, Florida State University
1. Emily ENGEL, Independent Scholar, “Manifesting Visual Battlefields in Late Viceregal South America”
2. Kristi PETERSON, Skidmore College, “Material Ecologies: Silver, Women, and the Body Politic in Spanish American Portraiture”
3. Emily GERHOLD, High Point University, “A Portrait of the Artist as a Pair of Breasts: (Re)Considering Sarah Goodridge’s Self Portrait (1828)”

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HECAA Reception
Saturday, 5:00–7:00, Paca
A cash bar with conviviality; bring your friends!

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Note (added 25 March) — The original posting did not include the HECAA-organized tours at the Baltimore museum or the HECAA reception.

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