Enfilade

ASECS in Vancouver, 2011

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on March 9, 2011

2011 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Vancouver, British Columbia, 17-20 March 2011

The 2011 ASECS conference takes place in Vancouver, British Columbia, March 17-20, at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre. Along with our annual luncheon and business meeting on Friday, HECAA will be represented by two panels (also on Friday) chaired by Douglas Fordham and David Ehrenpreis and Kevin Justus. In addition to these, a wide selection of sessions are also included below (admittedly there are lots of others that will interest HECAA members). For the full program, see the ASECS website.

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T H U R S D A Y , 1 7  M A R C H ,  2 0 1 1

8:00-9:30
The Material Culture of Authorship, Pavilion Ballroom C
Chair: Robert MILES, University of Victoria
1. David A. BREWER, The Ohio State University, “Authorial Heads: Painted, Printed, Carved and Cast”
2.  Brian COWAN, McGill University, “Henry Sacheverell and Material Celebrity in Eighteenth-Century Britain”
3. Sören C. HAMMERSCHMIDT, Ghent University, “‘The Best Work, or Best Character’: Intermedial Authorship in Alexander Pope’s Letters”
4. Tom MOLE, McGill University, “The Material Culture of Commemoration: The Scott Monument and the Reformed Nation”

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9:45-11:15
Clothing/Costume/Fashion – I,  Pavilion Ballroom C
Chairs: Vivian P. CAMERON, Independent Scholar AND William W. CLARK, Queens College and Graduate Center, City University of New York
1. Emily PFIEFER, University of California, Riverside, “Fashioning Absolute Control: Defining the French Autocratic Ideal through Indian Textile Regulation, 1700–1706”
2. Jeffrey COLLINS, Bard Graduate Center, “Cornelis Troost: Fashioning Satire in Eighteenth-Century Holland”
3. Meredith MARTIN, Wellesley College, “Fashion and Globalization in Pre-Revolutionary France”

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11:30-1:00
Clothing/Costume/Fashion – II, Pavilion Ballroom C
Chairs: William W. CLARK, Queens College and Graduate Center, City University of New York AND Vivian P. CAMERON, Independent Scholar
1. Denise Amy BAXTER, University of North Texas, “Fashion and the Maternal Body in France, 1792–1814”
2. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, “Much Ado about Muffs: Actresses, Accessories, and Austen”
3. Alicia KERFOOT, McMaster University, “‘Let firm, well-hammer’d Soles protect thy Feet’: Footwear and the Permeability of the Street in Gay’s Trivia

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2:30-4:00
Prints: Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century, Pavilion Ballroom C
Chair: Craig HANSON, Calvin College
1. Robert FOLKENFLIK, University of California, Irvine, “Illustrating English Novels in the Eighteenth Century”
2. Catharine INGERSOLL, University of Texas at Austin, “Medieval Margaret, Enlightenment Edinburgh: Alexander Runciman’s Etchings of St. Margaret of Scotland in their Historical Contexts”
3. Michael YONAN, University of Missouri, “‘The Uniqueness of English Humours’: Hogarth’s Prints and the German Critique of National Character”
4. Liza OLIVER, Northwestern University, “Sites of Exclusion and Slippages of Time: Murphy’s Arabian Antiquities of Spain, 1815”

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4:15-5:45
Aesthetics, Ethics, and Economics in Late Eighteenth-Century Art and Literature, Port McNeill
Chair: Catherine LABIO, University of Colorado, Boulder
1. Sophie RAUX, Université Lille 3, “Amateurs vs. Dealers: Defining the Value of Art in Enlightenment France”
2. Bradford MUDGE, University of Colorado, Denver, “Eating Money: Kitty Fisher, Joshua Reynolds, and the Ethics of Consumption”
3. Konstanze BARON, University of Halle-Wittenberg, “Diderot’s Les Deux amis de Bourbonne: The Passions and the Interests (of Reading)”
4. Yota BATSAKI, Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, DC, “‘Interesting in Every Sense: Economics, Ethics, and Aesthetics in Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative (1789)”

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6:00-7:30
A Round Table In Memory of Angela Rosenthal, Grand Ballroom A
Organized by Laura AURICCHIO, Bernadete FORT, and Melissa HYDE
Eight speakers will pay tribute to Angela Rosenthal’s life and the influence of her scholarship on the study of Eighteenth-Century visual culture.

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F R I D A Y , 1 8  M A R C H  2 0 1 1

8:00-9:30
The Dutch Connection in European Visual Arts, Pavilion Ballroom C
Chair: JoLynn EDWARDS, University of Washington, Bothell
1. Georgina COLE, University of Sydney, “Eavesdropping:  Rethinking Space and Subjectivity in the Eighteenth Century”
2. Christina K. LINDEMAN, Pima Community College, “Illustrating a Painter’s Profession:  Convergence of Dutch Genre Conventions in Anna Dorothea Therbusch’s Self Portraits
3. Craig HANSON, Calvin College, “From Scientific Illustration to the Painted Landscape: The Importance of Dutch Artists for British Visual Culture”
4. Julie CADOTTE, University of Montreal, “A French Play Seen by a Dutch Artist: Cornelis Troost and the Scene from Tartuffe

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9:45-11:15
Art Before Nationalism, Pavilion Ballroom C  — (Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture)
Chairs: David EHRENPREIS, James Madison University AND Douglas FORDHAM, University of Virginia
1.  Claude WILLAN, Stanford University, “Performance Anxiety: Sociality, Theatre, and Watteau’s political fêtes galantes”
2.  Andrew SCHULZ, University of Oregon, “Excavating Spain’s Islamic Past”
3.  Daniel O’QUINN, University of Guelph, “The Countenance of Patriotism: Sir Joshua Reynolds’ Portraits of Augustus Keppel”

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11:30-1:00
Looking Forward, Looking Back: HECAA’s New Scholars Session, Pavilion Ballroom C — (Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture)
Chair: Kevin L. JUSTUS, Independent Scholar
1. Leah SINGSANK, University of Arizona, “Ambiguity, Legibility, and the Erotic in Eighteenth-Century France”
2. Heidi E. KRAUS, The University of Iowa, “New Sources: David’s Sabine Women Reconsidered”
3. Molly MEDAKOVICH, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “A Portrait of Female Friendship: Juliette Récamier at the Abbaye-aux-Bois”

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1:00-2:30
HECAA Luncheon

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2:30-4:00
Presidential Address, Awards Presentation, and ASECS Business Meeting
Heather MCPHERSON, University of Alabama at Birmingham, “‘Thinking Heads’: Deciphering Enlightenment Portraits”

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4:15-5:45
Confluences and Continguties in Eighteenth-Century French Literary, Visual Arts and Musical Arts: A Seminar in Memory of Walter E. Rex,  Grand Ballroom BC
Chairs: Dorothy JOHNSON, University of Iowa AND Mary SHERIFF, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
1.  Paula RADISICH, Whittier College, ‘A bust, a globe,’ Chardin and the Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns”
2.  Tili Boon CUILLÉ, Washington University, “Staging the Supersensory”
3.  Christopher M. S. JOHNS, Vanderbilt University, “Canova’s Penitent Magdalene: Art, Literature, and Roman Catholicism in Napoleonic Paris.”

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S A T U R D A Y ,  1 9  M A R C H  2 0 1 1

9:45-11:15
Transfers and Transformations: The Visual Arts in the Iberian Peninsula and the New World – I, Grand Ballroom BC
Chair: Anne-Louise G. FONSECA, Université de Montréal
1. Giuseppina RAGGI, Centro Histórico de Além Mar / Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal, “A pintura de quadratura nas terras portuguesas d’aquém e além mar”
2. Rodrigo Almeida BASTOS, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais/ UNIVILLE, Brazil, “Adaptação de modelos e elementos portugueses na arquitetura religiosa do século XVIII em Minas Gerais, Brasil”
3. Rafael MOREIRA, Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Sociedade Portuguesa de Estudos do Século XVIII, Portugal, “A Portuguese “Temple of Solomon” in the Tropics: the Sanctuary of São Bento de Olinda in late Eighteenth-Century Brazil”

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2:00-3:30
Dogs and Cats, Monkeys and Birds: Pets and Pet Keeping in the Eighteenth Century, Finback
Chair: Julie-Anne PLAX, University of Arizona
1. Erin PARKER, University of Toronto, “Be our Guest: Pets, Hospitality, and Sarah Trimmer’s Fabulous Histories”
2. Ingrid TAGUE, University of Denver, “Fops and Dancing-Masters, Apes and Lapdogs: Masculinity  and Pets in England”
3. Sandra BARR , Independent Scholar, “Alone in a Crowd—the People’s Pet Rhino, Clara”
4. Kevin L. JUSTUS, Independent Scholar, “Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat, Where Have You Been?  I’ve been to Versailles to Visit the King: Louis XV’s
Pets, or How the King Loves and Indulges his Animals.”

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2:00-3:30
Transfers and Transformations: The Visual Arts in the Iberian Peninsula and the New World – II, Port McNeill
Chair: Gloria EIVE, Emerita, Saint Mary’s College of California
1. Sebastian FERRERO, Université de Montréal, “Un motivo andino en la Apoteosis de San Ignacio de Andrea Pozzo. La red jesuita y los alcances del conocimiento pseudo-etnográfico”
2. Leticia SQUEFF, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil, “History Painting or Allegory? Manuel Dias de Oliveira’s Nossa Senhora da Conceição”
3. Anne-Louise G. FONSECA, Université de Montréal, “Eighteenth-Century Colonial Painting in Brazil: Enlightenment and Cultural Transfers”

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3:45-5:15
Everyday Objects, Grand Ballroom BC
Chair: Paula RADISICH, Whittier College
1. Amy FREUND, Texas Christian University, “Things in Portraits: Everyday Objects and Personal Identity in Revolutionary France”
2. David EHRENPREIS, James Madison University, “Ordering Things: The Beauregard Primer of 1814”
3. Chi-ming YANG, University of Pennsylvania, “Race, Chinoiserie, and the Technology of the Umbrella”
4. Christine A. JONES, University of Utah, “The Eloquence of Porcelain  Objects in French Eighteenth-Century Painting”

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3:45-5:15
Naples Reconsidered, Grand Ballroom A
Chairs: Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville AND Amber LUDWIG, Boston University
1. Clorinda DONATO, California State University, Long Beach, “Of Synthetic Marble and Anatomical Machines:  Displaying Occult Science in Early Modern Naples”
2. Tom ALLSUP, Independent Scholar and Appraiser, “Eighteenth-Century Naples Porcelain”
3. Christoph WEBER, University of North Texas, “Witnesses to Disaster: Naples’ Response to the Calabrian Earthquake of 1783 in the Crossfire of German Travel Accounts”
4. Jack D’AMICO, Canisius College, “Naples, Byron, and the Early Risorgimento”

Call for Articles: Women in Eighteenth-Century Scotland

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on March 9, 2011

New Edited Collection on Women in Eighteenth-Century Scotland
Proposals due by 18 April 2011

The eighteenth century looms large in the Scottish imagination. It is a century that saw the doubling of the population, rapid urbanisation, industrial growth, the political Union of 1707, the Jacobite Rebellions and the Enlightenment – events that were intrinsic to the creation of the modern nation and to putting Scotland on the international map. The impact of the era on modern Scotland can be seen in the numerous buildings named after the luminaries of the period –Adam Smith, David Hume, William Robertson, the endorsement of Robert Burns as the national poet/ hero, the preservation of the Culloden battlefield as a tourist attraction, and the physical geographies of its major towns. Yet, while it is a century that remains central to modern constructions of national identity, it is a period associated with men. Until recently, the history of women in eighteenth-century Scotland, with perhaps the honourable exception of Flora McDonald, remained unwritten. Over the last decade however, research on women and gender in Scotland has flourished and we have an increasingly full picture of women’s lives at all social levels across the century. As a result, this is an appropriate moment to reflect on what we know about Scottish women during the eighteenth century, to ask how their history affects the traditional narratives of the period, and to reflect on the implications for a national history of Scotland and Scottish identity. (more…)