Enfilade

Display | The Curious Neoclassical Vision of Ennemond-Alexandre Petitot

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on March 25, 2015

Now on at the V&A:

The Curious Neoclassical Vision of Ennemond-Alexandre Petitot
Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 25 March — 6 December 2015

Curated by Sarah Grant

Ennemond-Alexandre Petitot, Suite de Vases (1 of 30 designs), etching by Benigno Bossi, 1770s (London: V&A)

Ennemond-Alexandre Petitot, Suite de Vases (1 of 30 designs), etching by Benigno Bossi, 1770s (London: V&A)

This display showcases 24 prints and drawings by French-born architect and designer, Ennemond-Alexandre Petitot (1727–1801) who was responsible for some of the most captivating and eccentric neoclassical ornamental designs ever produced.

Petitot received a classical training in Lyons, Paris and Rome and won the prestigious post of court architect to the Duke of Parma in 1753. He executed a diverse range of commissions for the ducal palace and other important interiors, bringing a distinctly French aesthetic to the architecture and gardens of Parma. In two famous suites of ornament prints published in the 1770s Petitot gave full reign to his imagination and ensured his legacy as one of the most original exponents of Neoclassicism. These prints and a number of Petitot’s drawings and works by other influential architects and designers form the focus of this display.

Display | Blue and White: British Printed Ceramics

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on March 25, 2015

Now on at the V&A:

Blue and White: British Printed Ceramics
Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 31 January 2015 — 3 January 2016

Plate, transfer-printed in enamel, 'Border' designed by Robert Dawson. Made by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Stoke-on-Trent, 2005 © Victoria and Albert Museum/WWRD United Kingdom Ltd/Robert Dawson

Plate, transfer-printed in enamel, ‘Border’ designed by Robert Dawson. Made by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Stoke-on-Trent, 2005 © Victoria and Albert Museum/WWRD United Kingdom Ltd/Robert Dawson

Blue-and-white printed ceramics are a pronounced British phenomenon with continued appeal for potters, artists and consumers. At its very best ceramic printing in blue results in a high-quality, technically precise and aesthetically pleasing decoration, enabling a rapid design response to society and culture.

This display features the wide variety of designs and decoration used in blue-and-white printed ceramics in Britain from the 1750s to present day, in both industrial and art production, demonstrating how these objects reflect British society, culture and interpret the wider world.

The display has been generously supported by The Headley Trust and includes loans from The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery, The Spode Museum Trust, The Wedgwood Museum and private collections.

Display | The Lost Art of Writing

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on March 25, 2015

The last weeks for this display at the V&A:

The Lost Art of Writing
Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 6 September 2013 — 4 May 2015

Inkstand, Sheffield plate, ca. 1810 (London: V&A)

Inkstand, Sheffield plate, ca. 1810 (London: V&A)

“Beautiful Writing pleases everyone, it makes one sought after,” explained the French writer Père Gregoire Martin in 1761.

Having a fine writing hand was not only a useful skill but the sign of an educated and genteel person

This small display in the Metalware gallery explores some of the objects used in writing, from a medieval penner to an ingenious 18th-century globe inkstand and a pen rest designed by the architect Alfred Waterhouse. These objects, made to serve the art of writing, have been displaced by the new virtual world of icons and toolbars.