Enfilade

Exhibition | Le dauphin, l’artiste et le philosophe

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on October 16, 2015

Opening this week at the Château de Fontainebleau:

Le dauphin, l’artiste et le philosophe: Autour de l’Allégorie à la mort du dauphin de Lagrenée l’Aîné
Château de Fontainebleau, 17 October 2015 — 25 January 2016

Curated by Marine Kisiel

Louis Jean François Lagrenée, Le Dauphin mourant entouré de sa famille (Château de Fontainebleau)

Louis Jean François Lagrenée, Le Dauphin mourant entouré de sa famille (Château de Fontainebleau)

Le château de Fontainebleau poursuit la mise en lumière de ses collections en consacrant, à l’automne 2015, une exposition à l’Allégorie à la mort du dauphin, une œuvre de Louis Lagrenée, dit l’Aîné.

Le 20 décembre 1765, Louis-Ferdinand, dauphin de France, s’éteint au château de Fontainebleau. Il est le fils de Louis XV et le père des futurs Louis XVI, Louis XVIII et Charles X. Le détail de sa vie ne nous est parvenu que par les représentations—livresques et artistiques—dont il a fait l’objet. Elles ont favorisé une reconstruction biographique posthume, souvent idéalisée, imprégnée par le contexte de l’opposition entre le parti dévot et les Encyclopédistes.

Exposée au Salon de 1767, l’Allégorie à la mort du dauphin participe de cette floraison artistique. Elle a suscité de nombreuses réactions, notamment celle de Diderot. D’abord critique acerbe du tableau, Diderot prend toutefois part, quelques année plus tard, à l’élaboration du mausolée d’un dauphin auquel tout semblait pourtant l’opposer.

En faisant converger les figures du dauphin, de Lagrenée et de Diderot, l’exposition se propose d’éclairer d’un jour nouveau cette allégorie, et d’examiner sa place dans les représentations de la mort et de l’immortalité que nous a léguées le siècle des Lumières.

L’exposition Le dauphin, l’artiste et le philosophe marque le 250e anniversaire de la mort du Dauphin Louis-Ferdinand et introduit une saison culturelle dédiée à Louis XV au château de Fontainebleau.

Additional information is available here»

Call for Papers | Serious Fun: Expressions of Play

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on October 16, 2015

From the Call for Papers:

Serious Fun: Expressions of Play in the History of Art and Architecture
The 32nd Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium on the History of Art and Architecture
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 26–27 February 2016

Proposals due by 21 November 2015

In all of its forms, play is a vital expressive force. Whether theatrical or athletic, rollicking or subversive, play has enacted a pivotal role in shaping cultural life. The 32nd Annual Boston University Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art and Architecture invites submissions that consider aspects of play as form, content, process, and methodological framework.

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to:
• representations of play
• entertainment, games, and toys
• spaces of play, leisure, and recreation
• play as practice
• political control of play
• play as dissent or activism
• word play
• the naughty and the bawdy
• revelry and whimsy
• play and performance
• play as creative force

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of their studies, working in any area or discipline. Please send an abstract (300 words or less), paper title, and a CV to the Symposium Coordinator, Catherine O’Reilly, at bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is Saturday, November 21, 2015. Selected speakers will be notified before January 1, 2016. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session.

The Symposium will be held Friday, February 26 – Saturday, February 27, 2016, with a keynote lecture (TBD) on Friday evening at the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery and graduate presentations on Saturday in the Riley Seminar Room of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

This event is generously sponsored by The Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association; and the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery.

 

MA in the Art Market and the History of Collecting, U of Buckingham

Posted in graduate students by Editor on October 16, 2015

MA in the Art Market and the History of Collecting
The University of Buckingham

Full and partial scholarships available

A one-year MA offered by the University of Buckingham and the National Gallery in association with Waddesdon Manor (Rothschild Collections) investigates American and European art markets and cultures of collecting from the Renaissance to the present day. The course is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, the National Gallery and Waddesdon Manor.

A unique feature of the course will be access to two of the greatest surviving art dealers’ archives: Agnew’s, acquired by the National Gallery in 2014, and Colnaghi’s, housed since February 2014 in the Windmill Hill Archive, Waddesdon Manor. It is the first MA in the UK to offer, under the guidance of experts, practical training on how to use, unlock and analyse these rich holdings.

Full and partial scholarships available generously funded by P & D Colnaghi & Co Ltd. Apply now for January 2016. For further information see the website  or contact: Claire Prendergast, Claire.Prendergast@Buckingham.ac.uk or Jeremy Howard jeremy.howard@buckingham.ac.uk.