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Call for Articles | French Porcelain, 1789–1918

Posted in Calls for Papers, journal articles by Editor on January 10, 2017

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Makers, Markets, and Museums: French Porcelain in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1789–1918
The French Porcelain Society Journal 7 (2018)

Proposals due by 7 April 2017

The French Porcelain Society Journal is the leading academic English-language journal on European ceramics and their histories, illustrated throughout in full colour. The society is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 6, Céramiques sans Frontières: The Transfer of Ceramic Designs and Technologies across Europe. Based on the society’s 2015 symposium, fourteen articles investigate the impact of French ceramic design on makers elsewhere in Europe and in Britain in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These range from an analysis of the transfer of the Istoriato maiolica tradition from Italy to France in the late sixteenth century and an account by J.V.G. Mallet of the travels of Walther Ehrenfried von Tschirnhaus to an investigation of the links between Sèvres and Minton porcelain in the nineteenth century. For a full list of contents or to order, please consult the society’s website.

The editors now invite submissions for volume 7 of the journal, Makers, Markets, and Museums: French Porcelain in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1789–1918, to be published in 2018. From the dispersal of Sèvres porcelain from royal palaces and aristocratic collections after the French Revolution to the founding of outstanding collections of French porcelain in Britain and the United States and the establishment of new museums for the decorative arts, the nineteenth century was undoubtedly one of seismic change. It witnessed the growth of a flourishing London art market and new departures in collecting French eighteenth-century decorative art, all encouraged by the rise of the dealer. Innovation in design and manufacture was documented in a plethora of printed specialist publications, pattern books and popular journals. It is hoped that this volume will enlarge our understanding of this under-researched but important aspect of ceramic history.

The journal will include an article based on the 2016 Geoffrey de Bellaigue lecture given to the society by Dr Tom Stammers (Durham University) on “Baron Jean-Charles Davillier: A Paragon and Historian of Taste in Nineteenth-Century France.” Topics for consideration could include:
•    Nineteenth-century French ceramics or those of other factories influenced by them
•    Nineteenth-century collectors
•    Methods of display in the nineteenth-century interior
•    The role of new museums, exhibitions, and publications in advancing the study and collecting of French ceramics
•    The dealer, the auction, and the art market
•    New technical advances in ceramic production
•    Connoisseurship

Submissions in the first instance should be a summary of no more than 750 words, with a brief description of the argument, a historiography and a note of the research tools and sources used. Please include a brief CV. The journal accepts articles in French as well as in English. The volume will comprise about 15 articles which will be peer reviewed by the editorial board and the FPS council of academic and museum specialists which includes: Dame Rosalind Savill, DBE, FBA, FSA (Curator Emeritus, The Wallace Collection, London); Oliver Fairclough, FSA, John Whitehead, FSA, Patricia Ferguson, Errol Manners, FSA, Diana Davis and Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth (University of Leeds). Articles should be no more than 6,000 words in length excluding endnotes. Up to 15 high-resolution images per article will be accepted. Please send abstracts as an e-mail attachment to: diana_davis@hotmail.co.uk by 7 April 2017. If your abstract is accepted, articles and images will be due by 29 September 2017.

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