Enfilade

New Book | ‘Muilman, Crokatt, and Keable’ by Gainsborough, ca. 1750

Posted in books by Editor on January 13, 2017

My heading is something of a misnomer. This publication isn’t a codex and doesn’t work the way even a digital book typically does. And yet, it also is different from a collection of essays, such as one finds in a journal (whether with paper or digital formats). I don’t think we (yet) have a name for this sort of publication. Perhaps it’s simply a catalogue, but that seems to suggest something grander than this entirely focused scope. I would welcome suggestions. Looking too casually at the Tate’s website where the publication is hosted, one might think it comparable to the sorts of entries often available on museum websites. And it may be akin in some ways, but it is conceived as a coherent, discreet publication, complete with an editor and peer review. The default word (for almost everything) now seems to be ‘project’. Whatever we call it, I’m looking forward to using it in class later this spring. CH

From Tate:

John Chu, ed., “A Tate In Focus Project: Peter Darnell Muilman, Charles Crokatt and William Keable in a Landscape c. 1750, by Thomas Gainsborough, ca. 1750,” with essays by John Chu, Huw David, Hannah French, Alexandra Gent, Rebecca Hellen, and Peter Moore, and a recording and interview by Hannah French (London: Tate Research Publication, 2017).

Peter Darnell Muilman, Charles Crokatt and William Keable in a Landscape c.1750 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 Purchased jointly with Gainsborough's House, Sudbury with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Art Fund and the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1993 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T06746

Thomas Gainsborough, Portrait of Peter Darnell Muilman, Charles Crokatt, and William Keable in a Landscape, ca.1750 (Tate T06746 / Gainsborough’s House).

Offering a multi-disciplinary discussion of Gainsborough’s early triple portrait, this project considers the painting as a depiction of polite and refined society, as a reflection of the growing wealth of a global mercantile elite, and as a ‘painting within a painting’ by an artist as renowned for his landscapes as he was his portraiture.

The mid-eighteenth-century ‘conversation piece’ Peter Darnell Muilman, Charles Crokatt and William Keable in a Landscape was painted by Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788) when he was still making a name for himself as landscape and portrait painter. It was acquired jointly by Gainsborough’s House and Tate in 1993 and is regarded as a masterpiece of this early phase of his career. This project draws together expertise from the fields of art history, conservation, history of commerce and musicology to throw light on the social and cultural milieu that gave rise to the commission. It asks as many questions about the financial and social privileges of the portrait’s sitters as it does about Gainsborough himself, proposing new ways of understanding why Muilman, Crokatt and Keable presented themselves making music in the midst of a remote rustic landscape.

C O N T E N T S

• John Chu—The Painting and ‘Early Gainsborough’
• Huw David—Patronage: Mercantile Sitters
• Rebecca Hellen and Alexandra Gent—Painting the Picture
• John Chu—Portraiture, Conversation, Politeness
• Hannah French—Music, Refinement, Masculinity
• Hannah French and John Chu,—Baroque Flute Recording and Interview with Hannah French
• John Chu—Landscape, Imitation, Cosmopolitanism
• Peter Moore—Mercantile Culture and National Identity
• Acknowledgments

Contributors
John Chu, Assistant Curator, Pictures and Sculpture, National Trust
Huw T. David, Director of Development, Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford
Rebecca Hellen, Paintings Conservator, Tate
Alexandra Gent, Paintings Conservator, Tate and Courtauld Institute of Art
Hannah French, musicologist and baroque flautist, Royal Academy of Music
Peter Moore, Research Curator, Gainsborough’s House

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Call for Papers | Water, Gods, and the Iconography of Power

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on January 13, 2017

Design for a Carriage Built by Andrea Cornely after a design by Ciro Ferri, engraving published in 'An Account of His Excellence, Roger Earl of Castelmaine's Embassy from His Sacred Majesty James the II King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland &c. To His Holiness Innocent XI' (London, ca. 1687). London: V&A 19393.

Design for a Carriage Built by Andrea Cornely after a design by Ciro Ferri, engraving published in An Account of His Excellence, Roger Earl of Castelmaine’s Embassy from His Sacred Majesty James the II King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland &c. To His Holiness Innocent XI (London, ca. 1687). London: V&A 19393. Inscriptions read: “The Tritons behind support two Majestic figures of Neptune & Britannia who extend each / an Arm & rear up the Imperial Crown of England’ and in the lower center of the plate, “A Marine Lion with two Genii each curbing ye Lion & Unicorn, one next Neptune holds his Trident”

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

A donde Neptuno reina: Water, Gods and the Iconography
of Early Modern Power (16th–18th Centuries)
CHAM Conference—Oceans and Shores: Heritage, People, and Environments
Lisbon, 12–15 July 2017

Proposals due by 1 February 2017

Since Antiquity, the personification of water—rivers or seas—has been a recurrent elements in the iconography related to power. From the Tigris to the Ganges, from the Mare Nostrum to the Atlantic Sea, water seems to have been an essential element in the visual display of powerful monarchies and empires. After the European discovery of the Americas, oceans started also to play an extraordinary role in allegorical representations, especially in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere, too. This panel approaches water iconography, especially as related to oceans, as a mode of representation of power during the early modern period, addressing its role in politics and culture. We are interested in arts, music, and literature, and how they relate to the iconography of water and its relationship with power. Especially welcome are cross-disciplinary contributions, proposals that address different cases studies in a comparative way, and studies focused on ephemeral architecture and theatrical contexts. Topics may include, but are not limited to:
Ephemeral art: Celebrations of victories, kings’ birthdays, or even religious events were the perfect context for the representation of water as the image of rulers.
Prints, emblems, and propaganda: How does the topic relate to rulers’ propaganda?
European powers and the new geography: How did sovereigns employ discoveries into their own images of power?
Odes, poetry, and epic: How did literature use the image of oceans and rivers to glorify rulers, and what were the implications for the visual arts?

More information is available at the CHAM conference website, and please direct any questions to Dr. Pilar Diez del Corral Corredoira, diezdelcorralcorredoira@tu-berlin.de. Proposals are due by 1 February 2017.

 

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Print Quarterly, December 2016

Posted in journal articles by Editor on January 13, 2017
unnamed

Domenico Bonaveri, Muscle Figure, pl. 10 from Notomie di Titiano (Bologna, ca, 1685–90), etching and engraving (Los Angeles: Getty Research Library).

The December 2016 issue of Print Quarterly includes several items relevant to the eighteenth century: articles concerning a redating of the Notomie di Titiano to c. 1685–90, a scrapbook in the Bibliotheca Thysiana in Leiden assembled in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century, and a rediscovered drawing of 1669–80 by Jean Boulanger, as well as shorter pieces on the Dresden festivities of 1719 and prints and propaganda in the age of Napoleon.

Print Quarterly 33.4 (December 2016)

A R T I C L E S
• Monique Kornell, “A Dating for Domenico Bonaveri’s Notomie di Titiano,” pp. 379–91.
• Daphne E. Woutsa, “Exploring the Thysiana Scrapbook,” pp. 391–406.
• Angelamaria Aceto, “A Rediscovered Drawing by Jean Boulanger (1608–c.1680),” pp. 406–15,

N O T E S
• Madeleine Brook, “Constellatio Felix in 1719,” pp. 449–51.
• Philippe Bordes, “Prints and Propaganda in the Age of Napoleon,” pp. 453–55.

A full content list is available here»

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Knole, Kent in the ‘NT Houses & Collections Annual, 2016’

Posted in journal articles by Editor on January 13, 2017

Now available for free digitally, or as a hard copy through the National Trust:

covernt2016The National Trust Historic Houses & Collections Annual 2016, published in association with Apollo, is dedicated to Knole in Kent and includes these essays on eighteenth-century topics:

• Camilla Beresford, “The Bird House At Knole.” Considers a mid-18th-century gothic curiosity that once housed a remarkable collection of exotic birds.
• Christopher Rowell and Wolf Burchard, “The Third Duke of Dorset and the First Earl Whitworth as Diplomatic Patrons and Collectors.” Considers the many examples of furniture at Knole associated with the French court on the eve and aftermath of the French Revolution.
• John Chu, “Thomas Gainsborough’s Portrait of Louis-Pierre, Marquis de Champcenetz.” On how the Marquis, whose portrait by Gainsborough returns to Knole this year, found refuge and friendship in England (the portrait was at Knole by 1793 and remained there until 1930).

A full list is available here»

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