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New Book | Gardens of Court and Country: English Design, 1630–1730

Posted in books by Editor on March 2, 2017

From Yale UP:

David Jacques, Gardens of Court and Country: English Design, 1630–1730 (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2017), 416 pages, ISBN: 978  0300  222012, £45 / $75.

51879841Gardens of Court and Country provides the first comprehensive overview of the development of the English formal garden from 1630 to 1730. Often overshadowed by the English landscape garden that became fashionable later in the 18th century, English formal gardens of the 17th century displayed important design innovations that reflected a broad rethinking of how gardens functioned within society. With insights into how the Protestant nobility planned and used their formal gardens, the domestication of the lawn, and the transformation of gardens into large rustic parks, David Jacques explores the ways forecourts, flower gardens, bowling greens, cascades, and more were created and reimagined over time.  This handsome volume includes 300 illustrations—including plans, engravings, and paintings—that bring lost and forgotten gardens back to life.

David Jacques is an independent scholar and a consultant in historic landscapes, parks, and gardens.

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Call for Papers | CAA in Los Angeles, 2018

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on March 2, 2017

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From CAA News (27 February 2017) . . .

106th Annual Conference of the College Art Association
Los Angeles, 21–24 February 2018

Proposals due by 17 or 24 April 2017 (depending upon type of proposal)

CAA’s Annual Conference Committee invites proposals of interest to its members and varied audiences. Submissions that cover the breadth of current thought and research in art and art practice, art and architectural history, theory and criticism, studio art, pedagogical issues, museum and curatorial practice, conservation, design, new media, and developments in technology are encouraged.

To submit a proposal, individuals must be current CAA members. All session participants, including presenters, chairs, moderators, and discussants, must also be current individual CAA members. Please have your CAA Member ID handy as well as the member IDs of any and all participants as this is a required field on the submission form. Please note that institutional member IDs cannot be used to submit proposals. If you are not a current individual member, please renew your membership or join CAA.

All session participants must also register for the conference. Online registration for CAA 2018 will begin October 2, 2017. Early conference registration will end December 15, 2017 and advance conference registration will end on February 7, 2018. Early and advance conference registration fees will not change from CAA 2017, New York.

The Annual Conference Committee will accept the following proposals for review: Complete Sessions, Sessions Soliciting Contributors, and Individual Paper/Project proposals. All sessions will be 90 minutes in length at CAA 2018. Please plan accordingly. For full details on the submission process for the conference, please review the information below and on the individual submission pages.

P R O P O S A L  S U B M I S S I O N  T Y P E S

Session Soliciting Contributors
Proposals due by 17 April 2017
The Session Soliciting Contributors option allows a submission for a full session (90 minutes in length) with yet-to-be identified speakers and papers/projects. If selected, such sessions will be included in the call for participation (CFP) which opens June 30.

Individual Paper/Project
Proposals due by 17 April 2017
Individual Paper/Project proposals (15 minutes in presentation length) may be submitted for review. No specific theme is required. The Annual Conference Committee will review and select paper/project proposals based on merit and group approved submissions into Composed Sessions of up to four participants. A liaison from the Annual Conference Committee will be identified for each Composed Session to assist with the format and to help identify a session chair or moderator.

Complete Session
Proposals due by 24 April 2017
The Complete Session option allows a submission for a complete panel (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance by session chairs. This session requires advance planning and information gathering by the chair(s).

Affiliated Societies
Proposals due by 24 April 2017
Each Affiliated Society may submit either one Complete Session proposal (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance or one Session Soliciting Contributors proposal (90 minutes in length) to be included in the CFP which opens June 30. A note of approval from the Affiliated Society chair must accompany the submission. This session will be guaranteed and will be identified as an Affiliated Society session in all CAA publications. Subsequent proposals by Affiliated Society members may be submitted separately by individuals, but are subject to peer review by the Annual Conference Committee and must be submitted via the Complete Session, Session Soliciting Contributors, or Individual Paper/Project submissions forms described above. These submissions are not guaranteed and, if selected, will not be labeled or identified as Affiliated Society sessions in CAA publications.

CAA PIPS Committees
Proposals due by 24 April 2017
CAA PIPS [Professional Interests, Practices, and Standards] committees may submit either one Complete Session proposal (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance or one Session Soliciting Contributors proposal (90 minutes in length) to be included in the CFP which opens June 30. A note of approval from the committee chair must accompany the submission. This session will be identified as a committee session in all CAA publications. Subsequent proposals by committee members may be submitted separately by individuals, but are subject to peer review by the Annual Conference Committee and must be submitted via the Complete Session, Session Soliciting Contributors, or Individual Paper/Project submissions forms described above. These submissions are not guaranteed and, if selected, will not be labeled or identified as committee sessions in CAA publications.

Rare Book School Offerings

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 2, 2017

Rare Book School offers five-day, intensive courses in several locations focused on the history of manuscript, print, and digital materials. Our courses this spring and summer will be held at the University of Virginia, Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Indiana University, Bloomington.

Among our more than thirty courses on the history of books and printing, we are pleased to offer courses of interest to those in the fields of art history and eighteenth-century studies. The following is a sample of the breadth of classes offered:
• I-10 The History of Printed Book Illustration in the West, taught by Erin C. Blake (Folger Shakespeare Library)
• H-100 The Eighteenth-Century Book, taught by Mark Dimunation (Library of Congress) and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. (University of Virginia & Rare Book School)
• H-30 The Printed Book in the West to 1800, taught by Martin Antonetti (Northwestern University)

Applications are now open on a rolling admissions basis. Visit our website for course details.

A 2016 RBS student remarked, “I will never look at a book—any book—the same way again,” and so we hope you will join us at an RBS course this year and learn to see books in a new way as well!

With kindest regards,
The RBS Programs Team

Research Lunch | Isabelle Baudino on Samuel Wale’s Book Illustrations

Posted in lectures (to attend) by Editor on March 2, 2017

From the Paul Mellon Centre:

Isabelle Baudino, Samuel Wale’s Book Illustrations:
Designing Historical Panoramas in Georgian London
Paul Mellon Centre, London, 31 March 2017

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Charles Grignion, after Samuel Wale, Britannia Allegory, between 1743 and 1747, Line engraving and etching; letterpress on verso on medium, slightly textured, cream laid paper (page in book) (Yale Center for British Art, Yale Art Gallery Collection).

Despite being a founding member of the Royal Academy of Arts, Samuel Wale (1721?–1786) has remained quite an elusive figure. Most of his easel paintings have disappeared and the greater part of his decorative works has been damaged or destroyed. Although he was apprenticed as an engraver, he started his career as a painter, attending classes at St Martin’s Lane Academy, decorating the Foundling Hospital and assisting Francis Hayman. While being consistently involved in the academic movement that led to the foundation of the Royal Academy, Wale also became one of the most prolific book illustrators of the day, designing hundreds of plates that contributed to the growing popularity of pictorial histories. Over the course of his forty-year career, he established a formulaic, full-page framed historical scene offering an unprecedented visualisation of British history. Indeed, building on his first selection of historical events, and drawing inspiration from the theatre, other books or paintings, Wale established a sequence of landmarks that gave an overview of Britain’s history from its ancient origins until modern times. He thus contributed to the visual perception of historical chronology and created images of national history that were emulated, adapted and appropriated. Friday, 31 March 2017, from 12:30 to 2:00pm. Registration information is available here.

I will argue that despite their low aesthetic and commercial value, the images that composed Wale’s historical panorama proved remarkably persistent because they brought together history, nationhood and iconography, thus transforming the understanding of history and fostering a new engagement with the past and its traces in the eighteenth-century present.

Isabelle Baudino is Senior Lecturer at the ENS in Lyons and has been a Visiting Fellow at Magdalene College, Cambridge, over the past academic year. Her work focuses on eighteenth-century British art with particular interest in history painting and the Royal Academy, taken individually, but also studied together in the context of the institutionalization of the arts in eighteenth-century Britain. Her study on Samuel Wale is part of a project which is generously supported by a mid-career fellowship from the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

 

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