Enfilade

Mauritshuis Acquires Pastel Portrait by Perronneau

Posted in museums by Editor on March 20, 2019

Press release (18 March 2019) from the Mauritshuis:

Jean-Baptiste Perronneau, ‘Portrait of Jacob van Kretschmar’, 1754, pastel and crayon on paper, 60 × 45 cm (The Hague: Mauritshuis, Gift of Jonkheer F.G.L.O. van Kretschmar, 2018).

Last year the Mauritshuis received a generous gift from Jonkheer F.G.L.O. van Kretschmar: a magnificent pastel portrait from 1754 by the French artist Jean-Baptiste Perronneau (ca. 1715–1783). The portrait shows Jacob van Kretschmar of The Hague, the donor’s ancestor. The pastel, which had remained in the family, is a superb example of Perronneau’s work. Pastels are extremely sensitive to light, and so cannot be on permanent display, but from today the new acquisition will be exhibited for several months in Room 13.

Emilie Gordenker, Mauritshuis Director: “We are deeply grateful to Jonkheer van Kretschmar. The Mauritshuis has a small, but fine collection of eighteenth-century pictures—in particular pastels—and this acquisition enhances our holdings in this area significantly.”

Travelling Pastel Artists

The eighteenth century in the Netherlands is often described in art historical literature as the century of Cornelis Troost (1696–1750). The Mauritshuis has a unique collection of pastels by Troost, including the well-known NELRI series (a set of five humorous pastels). Troost was only one of many artists working at that time. The art world was extremely international in the eighteenth century and artists travelled throughout Europe. There were many foreign portrait painters working in the Netherlands for varying lengths of time. With the arrival of talented artists such as the Parisian Jean-Baptiste Perronneau, the Swiss Jean-Étienne Liotard (1702–1789) and the German Johann Friedrich August Tischbein (1750–1812), pastel portraits became popular in the Netherlands. Perronneau was the first foreign pastel artist to come and work in the Netherlands, and it was during his first stay that he produced the portrait of Van Kretschmar.

Today we know of some 45 portraits that Perronneau made in the Netherlands, thirty of which are pastels and the rest oil paintings. After his first visit in 1754, the artist regularly returned to the Netherlands, where he was extremely successful. Almost half of the extant Dutch portraits were created during Perronneau’s second stay in 1761 in Amsterdam and The Hague. He also made portraits of the young Orange prince William V and his sister Princess Wilhelmina Carolina at that time, but further commissions from the court never materialised. Perronneau died in 1783 in Amsterdam.

Portrait of Jacob van Kretschmar

Perronneau signed and dated the pastel in elegant letters in the top left-hand corner: “Perronneau / Peintre du Roy / en 1754 / à La Haye.” The composition of the portrait is simple, yet powerful. The 33-year-old military man Jacob van Kretschmar (1721–1792) is portrayed half-length. The loose, but convincing way in which Perronneau rendered the details in the powdered hair and the jabot—the frill of lace at the neck—demonstrate his great talent. The portrait’s appeal is further enhanced by the elegant, seemingly relaxed pose, the bright colours and the serene light. The blue tailcoat edged with gold thread stands out against the light background, where the blue of the paper still shimmers through.

About the Donor

The donor of the pastel by Perronneau is a well-known figure in the Dutch museum world. Jonkheer F.G.L.O van Kretschmar (1919–2019) was a Dutch art historian and genealogist. He was the director of the Iconographic Bureau for many years, which today forms part of the Netherlands Institute for Art History—RKD in The Hague. Van Kretschmar was of great value to the Iconographic Bureau—he saw to it that the institution did not solely concentrate on collecting documentation about Dutch portraits, but also focused on their scientific study. He also made a great personal contribution with his publications on Dutch portrait art—published over many decades—and the inventories he made of private collections of family portraits, usually depicting members of the aristocracy. Van Kretschmar’s great dedication to and keen interest in Dutch cultural heritage were recognised when he was awarded the silver museum medal on his retirement as director in 1984.

Presentation

The portrait of Jacob van Kretschmar will be on display in Room 13 until 7 July, along with a self-portrait by Cornelis Troost. An engaging pastel portrait of Wilhelmina of Prussia by Tischbein, one of several versions that is rarely on view and is still in its original frame, will also be in Room 13. The three pastels will be accompanied by a number of eighteenth-century painted portraits, including a portrait of a man by Troost and George van der Mijn’s portraits of Cornelis Ploos van Amstel and his wife. There could be no better setting for these works than this room with its eighteenth-century interior.

caa.reviews Seeks Editors, 2019–22

Posted in opportunities by Editor on March 20, 2019

Worth noting that the Field Editor for Eighteenth-Century Art is one of the open positions; from CAA News:

caa.reviews Seeks Editor-in-Chief
Applications due by 1 April 2019

The caa.reviews Editorial Board invites nominations and self-nominations for the position of Editor-in-Chief for a three-year term, July 1, 2020–June 30, 2023. This term is preceded by one year of service on the editorial board as editor designate, July 1, 2019–June 30, 2020, and followed immediately by one year of service as past editor. Candidates should have published substantially in the field and may be academic, museum-based, or independent scholars; institutional affiliation is not required. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of new books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to the fields of art history, visual studies, and the arts.

Working with the editorial board, the editor-in-chief is responsible for the content and character of the journal. The editor-in-chief supervises the caa.reviews Council of Field Editors, assisting them in identifying and soliciting reviewers, articles, and other content for the journal; develops projects; and makes final decisions regarding content.

The editor-in-chief attends the caa.reviews Editorial Board’s three meetings each year—held in New York in May and October and once at the Annual Conference in February—and submits an annual report to CAA’s Board of Directors. CAA reimburses the editor-in-chief for travel and lodging expenses for the two New York meetings in accordance with its travel policy, but the person in this position pays these expenses to attend the conference. The editor-in-chief also works closely with the CAA staff in New York and receives an annual honorarium paid quarterly.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, at least one letter of recommendation, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editor-in-Chief Search, CAA, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY, 10004; or email the documents to Publications and Programs Editor Joan Strasbaugh, jstrasbaugh@collegeart.orgDeadline: April 1, 2019; finalists will be interviewed in early May.

caa.reviews Seeks Four Field Editors
Application due by 15 April 2019

In addition, CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for four individuals to join the caa.reviews Council of Field Editors for a three-year term July 1, 2019–June 30, 2022. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of new books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to art history, visual studies, and the arts.

The journal seeks four field editors in the following areas:

  • Design History
  • Eighteenth-Century Art
  • Architecture and Urbanism
  • Theory and Historiography

Working with the caa.reviews editor-in-chief, the caa.reviews Editorial Board, and CAA’s staff editor, each field editor selects content to be reviewed, commissions reviewers, and considers manuscripts for publication. Field editors for books are expected to keep abreast of newly published and important books and related media in their fields of expertise, and those for exhibitions should be aware of current and upcoming exhibitions (and other related projects) in their geographic regions.

The Council of Field Editors meets yearly at the CAA Annual Conference. Field editors must pay travel and lodging expenses to attend the conference. Members of all CAA committees and editorial boards volunteer their services without compensation.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a cover letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editorial Board, CAA, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents to staff editor Joan Strasbaugh, jstrasbaugh@collegeart.orgDeadline: April 15, 2019.