Enfilade

Print Quarterly, December 2019

Posted in books, exhibitions, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 4, 2019

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 36.4 (December 2019)

Étienne Fessard and Augustin de Saint-Aubin, after Charles Natoire, Gaetano Brunetti, and Paolo Antonio Brunetti, Perspective View of the Chapel of Enfants Trouvés in Paris, 1759, etching and engraving, sheet (trimmed) 80 × 59 cm (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art).

A R T I C L E S

Rena M. Hoisington, “Étienne Fessard’s Prints of the Chapel of the Hôpital des Enfants Trouvés in Paris,” pp. 404–25.

Soon after Charles Natoire (1700–1777) completed his cycle of paintings for the Chapel of the Hôpital des Enfants Trouvés in Paris, Fessard announced a subscription plan for a series of prints reproducing them. Often addressed merely for their documentary value, these prints are here analysed as objects in themselves. The article explores their complex publication history and assesses them in the context of Fessard’s career. Also analysed is the series’ repercussion on the reputation of the artists involved in their realization, Natoire included.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Colin Harrison, Review of Peter Whitfield, Oxford in Prints: 1675–1900 (Bodleian Library, 2016), p. 448.

The book explores how Oxford has been pictured between 1675 and 1922 by illustrating a selection of volumes in the collection of the Bodleian Library. The largest group consists of almanacks printed by the University, which took their definitive format of a topographical headpiece with a calendar beneath in the early eighteenth century.

Jean Michel Massing, Review of Cheryl Finley, Committed to Memory: The Art of the Slave Ship Icon (Princeton University Press, 2018), p. 484–88.

The book “focuses on the life, and afterlife, of  famous anti-slavery icon,” the 1788 engraved Plan of an African Ship’s lower Deck with Negroes in the proportion of only one to a Ton (484). Part One “considers abolitionist slave ship prints from the period 1788 to 1900; the remainder of the book is devoted to their stature as an icon reappropriated by twentieth-century African American, British and African artists” (488).

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Mungo Campbell and Nathan Flis, eds., William Hunter and the Anatomy of the Modern Museum, exhibition catalogue (Yale Center for British Art, and The Hunterian, University of Glasgow, in association with Yale University Press, 2018), p. 472.