Enfilade

Print Quarterly, June 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 20, 2020

The eighteenth century in the current issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 37.2 (June 2020)

Rembrandt van Rijn, Portrait of Jan Six, 1647, etching, engraving, and drypoint, 244 × 191mm (Amsterdam: Rijksprentenkabinett).

A R T I C L E S

Antoinette Friedenthal, “Sketched, Not Etched: Jan Six and the Mariettes’ Rembrandt Oeuvre for Prince Eugene of Savoy,” pp. 140–51.

This article considers the compilation of the Rembrandt album originally produced for Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663–1736). Particular emphasis is placed on the attempts to procure a rare impression of Rembrandt’s Portrait of Jan Six. Reference to the correspondence of Jean Mariette (1660–1742) and Pierre Jean Mariette (1694–1774) on the matter and their draft catalogue reveals that the Prince’s etched Portrait of Jan Six is, in fact, a drawn copy after the print. This in turn serves to support the proposal that the Prince of Savoy’s Rembrandt album is not held in Dresden as previously thought, but instead in the Albertina in Vienna.

N O T E S  A N D  R E V I E W S

Helmut Gier, Review of New Hollstein German Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts, 1400–1700: Johann Ulrich Kraus, Parts I–V, (2018–19), pp. 180–83.

The note provides an overview of the five New Hollstein volumes that bring together the corpus of Johann Ulrich Kraus (1655–1719). A prodigious printmaker and publisher, Kraus’s diverse output included commissions for various European courts, book illustrations, architectural treatises, and portraits. He is notable for sensitivity to, and amalgamation of, the latest French, Italian, Dutch, and German artistic trends.

Giorgio Marini, Review of Elisabetta Rizzioli, L’Officina di Leopoldo Cicognara: La Creazione delle Immagini per la ‘Storia della Scultura’ (2016), pp. 184–87.

Rizzioli’s book focuses on the art theorist and critic Francesco Leopoldo Cicognara (1767–1834), who “played a crucial role in the promotion of the arts from the Neoclassical period to the 1814–15 Congress of Vienna, relying on an international artistic community to which Antonio Canova (1757–1822) had introduced him.”

P U B L I C A T I O N S  R E C E I V E D

Antonia Dosen, Dubravka Botica, Anamarija Stepanić, Andelika Galić, and Petra Milovac, eds., Architecture and Performance: Prints from the Cabinet of Louis XIV in the MUO Holdings, exhibition catalogue (Zagreb: Museum of Arts and Crafts, 2016), p. 204.

“With parallel Croatian and English texts, the well-illustrated Architecture and Performance is dedicated to three groups of prints that were part of the so-called Cabinet du Roi . . . the three volumes dedicated to the Louvre, the Tuileries, Versailles and the royal festivals.”

Call for Papers | The Architectural Model

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on June 20, 2020

From ArtHist.net (19 June 2020) . . .

The Architectural Model as Tool, Medium, and Agent of Change
Special issue of Architectural Theory Review, edited by Matthew Mindrup and Matthew Wells


Proposed articles due by 15 September 2020

The architectural model has long held an important role in the edification of buildings, not least as a descriptive tool, a source of inspiration and a medium for studying new designs. Since around the fifteenth century it has served primarily as an explanatory guide for clients and builders, but there is ample evidence to support the view that it also played an important role in the generation and formulation of new designs over that same timespan, during critical moments of change in social, technical or even institutional practices. This latter role is often overlooked in architectural history and theory, even though it enjoys a similar longevity. Addressing this lacuna, we seek submissions that examine architectural modelling practices and theories which emerged from or helped to define critical moments of evolution in the history of architecture. This special issue will show how the employment of architectural models in these instances is a crucial indication of architecture’s history and capacity the discipline’s capacity for self-reflection.

Whether physical, conceptual, or digital, models stand somewhere between theoretical concepts and contingent realities, reflective of both settings, thereby allowing us to use them as instruments in our understanding of both situations. Long familiar in the sciences is the transition in cosmology from a Ptolemaic cosmology to a Copernican one. Recent research has taken a closer look at similar roles which the architectural model has had on architectural practice including the commercialisation of model making practices upon design during the post-war years in the United States; the role of paper in translating drawings to models in sixteenth-century Italy, the effect of artists and art practice on architectural models in the education of German architects during the early twentieth century and the emergence of the digital model in construction practices over the past thirty years.

The wide range of ways in which the model affects change in architectural culture warrants closer inspection. What are the ‘theories’ that motivate the form and function of models for architecture in those moments? We invite authors to consider this problem from any angle, reading the model in the broadest terms possible. Submissions may consider with new questions cases of apparently canonical importance, or address the ideas and projects of underrepresented practitioners and organizations. They might consider instances in which models (or practices involving the model, or modelling) have become sites of disciplinary adoration and/or discursive attention. How has the architectural model been an essential tool, medium or agent of change? This number of ATR hopes to shed light on a still relatively scarce archive of architectural modelling practices that motivates and mobilizes individuals, institutions and industries to rethink the built environment.

We seek papers that fall into one of four categories:

1) Modelling change — How can models (and their exhibition) be seen and understood as lodestars for critical moments of change in architectural culture?

2) Modelling theories — What particular moments or epochs in architectural theory were particularly concerned with conceptualising the model or, likewise, how were theories of architecture affected by models themselves?

3) New materials and techniques — What new model-making materials and tools, as well as the role of models (and mock-ups) emerged to advance the testing of particular formal, material, structural or technical solutions? How did new model-making materials and tools suggest new roles for the model, and how did this inform new developments in architectural practice and pedagogy?

4) Agency of the architect-as-model-maker — What is the model-maker’s role as an actor in the production of the built environment? Either as an architect, or as a practitioner in their own right? What can the examination of model-makers within architectural practices and those without tell us about their role in architectural culture?

We welcome the submission of previously unpublished, research-based writing that addresses these questions. Scholarly texts of between 4000 and 8000 words (including notes) will undergo double-blind, peer review. Although authors are invited to submit papers on people, places, and projects across the globe, all submissions must be written in (or translated into) English for consideration.

The deadline for the submission of completed manuscripts is 15 September 2020. Please submit manuscripts to the journal’s website. The editors welcome expressions of interest prior to paper submissions and are available for discussing possible contributions. For any questions regarding this issue please contact:

Matthew Mindrup, matthew.mindrup@sydney.edu.au
Matthew Wells, matthew.wells@gta.arch.ethz.ch

Manuscript submission guidelines can be found on the Architectural Theory Review website.