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ASECS 2021, Online

Posted in conferences (to attend), online learning by Editor on April 6, 2021

Starting Wednesday, with sessions running until Sunday evening!

2021 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Online, 7–11 April 2021

The 51st annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies takes place online. HECAA will be represented by the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Susanna Caviglia and scheduled for Saturday afternoon at 2:50 and the annual business meeting, right after that, starting at 3:55. A selection of 33 additional panels is included below (of the 182 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full slate of offerings, see the program. Regular registration is $80; discounted rates are $35. All times are Eastern Standard Time.

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W E D N E S D A Y ,  7  A P R I L  2 0 2 1

Spanish Sensorium
Wednesday, 12:10–1:10
Chair: Elena DEANDA-CAMACHO, Washington College
1. Lilian BRINGAS SILVA, Georgetown University, “Los bodegones de Goya”
2. Karissa BUSHMAN, Quinnipiac University, “Goya’s Illnesses and Deafness and the Impact on his Senses”
3. Meira GOLDBERG, Fashion Institute of Technology, CUNY, “The Space of Perfect Rhythm: Experiencing the Flamenco Circle”
4. Rachael Givens JOHNSON, University of Virginia, “Moving the Faithful: Hearing, Seeing, and Feeling in Eighteenth-Century Spanish- Atlantic Religious Festivals”

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Publishing Natural History
Wednesday, 12:10–1:10
Chairs: Eleanore NEUMANN, University of Virginia, and Agnieszka Anna FICEK, CUNY
1. April SHELFORD, American University, “More Estimable than Sloane? Patrick Browne’s Civil and Natural History of Jamaica (1756)”
2. Marianne VOLLE, York University/Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, “Natural History in the Making: Exploring the Network and Botanical Collection of Fougeroux de Bondaroy (1732–1789)”
3. Taylin NELSON, Rice University, “The ‘Totality’ of the Animal: Systems of Classification and Domestication”
4. Demetra VOGIATZAKI, Harvard University, “Three Allegorical Caves in Choiseul-Gouffier’s Voyage Pittoresque de la Grèce (1782)”

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Built Form in the Long Eighteenth Century
Wednesday, 1:20–2:20
Chair: Janet WHITE, UNLV
1. Luis J. GORDO PELAEZ, California State University, “Grain Architecture in Bourbon New Spain”
2. Paul HOLMQUIST, Louisiana State University, “Une autre nature: Aristotelian Strains in Ledoux’s Theory of Architecture as Legislation”
3. Dylan Wayne SPIVEY, University of Virginia, “Building from a Book: James Gibb’s Book of Architecture and the Commodification of Architectural Style”
4. Miguel VALERIO, Washington University in St. Louis, “Architecture of Devotions: The Churches Afro-Brazilian Religious Brotherhoods Built in the Eighteenth Century”

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Canada or the Tower: Finding, Depicting, and Imagining Canada
Wednesday, 2:50–3:50
Chair: Cristina S. MARTINEZ, University of Ottawa
1. Georgiana UHLYARIK, Art Gallery of Ontario, “Kanata: Indigenous Sovereignty and the Canadian Imagination”
2. Dominic HARDY, Université du Québec à Montréal, “Thomas Davies’ Watercolours of Québec under British Colonial Rule (1760–1812), Iconographies of Landscape, Identity, and Memory”
3. Marjolaine POIRIER, Université du Québec à Montréal, “Space, Place, and the figurant: Looking at Quebec City in 3D during the American Revolution”
4. Isabelle MASSE, UCLA and Concordia University, “Lower Canada or the Debtors’ Prison: Insolvent Portraitists on the Run”

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Imagining the Future in Ruins
Wednesday, 2:50–3:50
Chair: Thomas BEACHDEL, Hostos, CUNY
1. Amy DUNAGIN, Kennesaw State University, “Rosamund’s Bower, Addison’s Rosamond, and Whig Visions of British Ruin”
2. Anne Betty WEINSHENKER, Montclair State University, “Freemasonic Elements in the Tombeaux des princes
3. Jason BIRCEA, University of California, Berkeley, “The Sound of Depopulation in Oliver Goldsmith’s The Deserted Village
4. Susannah B. SANFORD, Texas Christian University, “Birds and the Bees: Clara and Environmental Ruin in Sansay’s Secret History

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Playing with Pigments: Color Experiments in the Visual Arts
Wednesday, 4:00–5:00
Chairs: Daniella BERMAN, New York University, and Caroline M. CULP, Stanford University
1. Alicia MCGEACHY, Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts, “Through the Colored Glaze: Multi-analytical Studies of Eighteenth-Century Chelsea Ceramics”
2. Thea GOLDRING, Harvard University, “Printing Nature’s Taches: The Invention of Aquatint and the Depiction of Human Varieties”
3. Colleen STOCKMANN, Gustavus Adolphus College, “Climate and the Spectrum of Indigo Production in the Americas, 1740–1780”

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From Tabula Rasa to Terra Incognita: Landscape and Identity in the Enlightenment
Wednesday, 4:00–5:00
Chair: Shirley TUNG, Kansas State University
1. Michael BROWN, University of Aberdeen, “Locating Britain: The English Geographies of Daniel Defoe”
2. John DAVENPORT, Missouri Southern State University, “Topographical Dialogues and Competing Claims to Selfhood in Eighteenth-Century Travel Writing”
3. Kasie ALT, Georgia Southern University, “Negotiating the Self through Landscape Design and Representation: Thomas Anson’s Estate at Shugborough”
4. Julia SIENKEWICZ, Roanoke College, “Landscape and Alterity: Encounters with Virginia and South Africa”

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Amateur or Professional? Reconsidering the Language of Artistic Status
Wednesday, 5:10–6:10
Chairs: Paris SPIES-GANS, Harvard Society of Fellows, and Laurel PETERSON, Independent Scholar
1. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, “Fashioning Fairies: Lady Diana Beauclerk’s Watercolors”
2. Luke FREEMAN, University of Minnesota, “Engraving Authority: Bernard Picart’s Status and the ‘Leading Hands of Europe’”
3. Maura GLEESON, Independent Scholar, “Picturing La Créatrice: Image, Imagination, and Artistic Practice in Napoleonic France”
4. Cynthia ROMAN, The Lewis Walpole Library, “‘Not Artists’: Horace Walpole’s Hyperbolic Praise of Prints by Persons of Rank and Quality”

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Colonial Matter in the Eighteenth-Century World
Wednesday, 5:10–6:10
Chairs: Danielle EZOR, Southern Methodist University, and Kaitlin GRIMES, University of Missouri-Columbia
1. Amelia RAUSER, Franklin & Marshall College, “Madras Cloth: Currency, Costume, and Enslavement”
2. Kelly FLEMING, University of Virginia, “Empire, Satire, and the Regency Cap in The Adventures of an Ostrich Feather of Quality (1812)”
3. Yiyun HUANG, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, “‘Nothing but large potions of tea could extinguish it’: Chinese Knowledge and Discourse of Tea in Colonial America”

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T H U R S D A Y ,  8  A P R I L  2 0 2 1

Roundtable: Scholarly Tourism: Traveling to Research the Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 11:00–noon
Chair: Ula Lukszo KLEIN, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
1. Meg KOBZA, Newcastle University, “Places of Privilege: Price and Practice in Private Archives”
2. Caroline GONDA, Cambridge University, “Strawberry Hill and Shibden Hall: Anne Damer and Anne Lister”
3. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, “The Archival Tourist”
4. Fiona RITCHIE, McGill University, “Mentoring Student Researchers in the Archives”
5. Yvonne FUENTES, University of West Georgia, “Eighteenth-Century Gossip and News: The Archives of Spanish Parish Churches, Cathedrals, and Basilicas”

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Roundtable: Methods for Bibliography and Eighteenth-Century Studies
Thursday, 12:10–1:10
Chair: J. P. ASCHER, University of Virginia
1. Mathieu BOUCHARD, McGill University, “Beaumont and Fletcher in 1711: The Bibliographical Analysis of an Anonymous Editor”
2. Ashley CATALDO, American Antiquarian Society, “Bradstreet’s Pastedowns: De(bri)s Bibliography”
3. David LEVY, Writer, “Collateral Bibliography: Are Hoyle Collections Separate Issues?”
4. Nina M. SCHNEIDER, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA, “Three-Dimensional Bibliography: Plaster Casts in the Sir John Soane Museum”
5. Michael VANHOOSE, University of Virginia, “A Rationale for Cliometric Bibliography, with Applications to British Papermaking, 1782–1837”

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Vital Matters: Materialism(s) in the Eighteenth Century and Beyond
Thursday, 12:10–1:10
Chair: Pichaya (Mint) DAMRONGPIWAT, Cornell University.
1. Jess KEISER, Tufts University, “Cavendish contra New Materialism; or, Anthropomorphism in Lyric and Panpsychism”
2. Susan EGENOLF, Texas A&M University, “Josiah Wedgwood, Thomas Griffiths, and the Mystique of Cherokee Clay”
3. Roger MAIOLI, University of Florida, “England’s First Atheistic Manifesto”
Respondent: Lucinda COLE, University of Illinois

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The Sister Arts in Eighteenth-Century Ireland
Thursday, 12:10–1:10
Chair: Michael GRIFFIN, University of Limerick
1. Scott BREUNINGER, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Improvement and the Arts during the Early Irish Enlightenment”
2. Tríona O’HANLON, Independent Scholar, “The Violinist in Eighteenth-Century Dublin: A Case Study Addressing the Connection between Cultural Activity and Political Agendas in Eighteenth-Century Ireland”
3. David BURROW, University of South Dakota, “Assessing Russia: Artistic Taste and Civilizational Values”

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‘Too Political, Too Big, No Good’: Picturing Politics
Thursday, 3:40–4:40
Chair: Jessica L. FRIPP, Texas Christian University
1. Alexandra CALDON, Graduate Center, CUNY, “Engaging the Public: The Rejection of Mythology in Royal Almanac Prints, 1695–1715”
2. J. Patrick MULLINS, Marquette University, “Thomas Hollis’s ‘Liberty Prints’ and the Transatlantic Cult of Tyrannicide”
3. Thomas BUSCIGLIO-RITTER, University of Delaware, “Denis Volozan’s Portrait of George Washington in an Atlantic Context”
4. Marina KLINGER, New York University/The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “From ‘Great Men’ to ‘Women’s Influence’: Retelling the Story of Louis Ducis’s Tasso and Eleonora d’Este from the Empire to the Restoration”

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Visualizing the French Empire
Thursday, 4:50–5:50
Chairs: Philippe HALBERT, Yale University, and Izabel GASS, Yale University
1. Alexandre DUBÉ, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, and Sophie WHITE, University of Notre Dame, “The Stuff of Conviction”
2. Agnieszka Anna FICEK, CUNY, “Picturing the Péruvienne: The Exotic and Erotic in the Illustrations to Mme. de Graffigny’s Lettres d’une Péruvienne
3. Joseph LITTS, Princeton University, “Materials, Race, and the Body in the Franco-Swiss Atlantic World”
4. Thomas BEACHDEL, Hostos, CUNY, “The Sublime Future of Ruins”

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2020 Presidential Session: The Carbon Footprint of ASECS: What to Do?
Thursday, 4:50–5:50
Organizer: Jeffrey S. RAVEL, MIT
ASECS can no longer ignore its contributions to climate change. Given the rapidly increasing rate of natural disasters around the globe, each of us has an ethical responsibility to reduce their carbon footprint. We will all have to make painful sacrifices to repair the damage already done to the environment. ASECS has one built-in advantage that we can leverage—our roster of regional affiliate societies. We might, for example, hold the annual meeting every other year, and then encourage attendance at the meetings of the regional societies in years when we did not convene the national meeting. For both the national and regional conferences, we might build a more robust remote system that would allow members without funding or those who do not wish to travel by plane or car to participate virtually. In this session, the chair would like to start a conversation with all concerned members of the Society about responsible steps ASECS can take going forward.

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F R I D A Y ,  9  A P R I L  2 0 2 1

Roundtable: Cultural Histories of Fame and Celebrity in the Age of Enlightenment
Friday, 11:00–noon
Chair: Brian COWAN, McGill University
1. Meghan ROBERTS, Bowdoin College, “Fame and the French Enlightenment”
2. Heather MCPHERSON, University of Alabama at Birmingham, “The Visual Arts and Modern Celebrity in Georgian England”
3. Ted MCCORMICK, Concordia University (Montreal), “Fame and Celebrity in Eighteenth-Century Science”
4. Pascal BASTIEN, Université de Quebec à Montréal, “Infamy in Eighteenth-Century France”
5. Sydney AYRES, Institute of Advanced Study, Edinburgh University, “Contemporary Celebrity vs. Posthumous Fame in Britain, c.1790–1820”
6. Antoine LILTI, EHESS (Paris), “Eighteenth-Century Celebrity”

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Collecting, Antiquities, and Eighteenth-Century Art
Friday, 12:10–1:10
Chairs: Katherine ISELIN, University of Missouri-Columbia, and Lauren DISALVO, Dixie State University
1. Freya GOWRLEY, University of Derby, “Classical Specimens and Fragmentary Histories: The Specimen Table as Part and Whole”
2. Josh HAINY, Truman State University, “For Their Mutual Benefit: John Flaxman’s Recreation of the Belvedere Torso for Thomas Hope”
3. Katherine CALVIN, Kenyon College, “Collecting on Credit: The British Levant Company in Aleppo’s Art and Money Markets”

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ASECS Listening Session
Friday, 1:20–2:20
Presiding: Nyree GRAY, ASECS Ombuds and Associate Vice President / Chief Civil Rights Officer, Claremont McKenna College
The many ASECS members who have recently contacted the Executive Board are concerned about a range of issues regarding the Society. Therefore, the Board has decided to devote the Friday plenary to a Listening Session, at which ASECS members are invited to share their thoughts and suggestions. Another Listening Session will be held during the 5:10–6:10 time slot on Friday evening. Through these meetings, members can help develop an agenda for a Town Hall Meeting, to be held on April 23.

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William Hogarth in the Twenty-First Century
Friday, 2:50–3:50
Chair: Nick ALLRED, Rutgers University
1. Ann VON MEHREN, University of Memphis, “Black Children in Hogarth’s ‘Modern Morality’ Art”
2. Corey GOERGEN, Georgia Institute of Technology, “‘Makes Human Race a Prey’: Hogarth’s Gin Lane in Twenty-First-Century Public Health Campaigns”
3. Debra BOURDEAU, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, “Hogarth’s Bedlam: A Rake’s Progress and Britain’s Mental Health Crisis”

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Roundtable: Reflections on David Gies and Cynthia Wall, eds., The Eighteenth Centuries: Global Networks of Enlightenment
Friday, 2:50–3:50
Chair: Elizabeth Franklin LEWIS, University of Mary Washington
1. Jeanne BRITTON, University of South Carolina, “Using Global Networks of Enlightenment: Giovanni Piranesi and the Digital Eighteenth Centuries”
2. Valentina TIKOFF, DePaul University, “Using Global Networks of Enlightenment: How Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Multiple Geographies, and Linguistic Perspectives Help Us Navigate and Teach the Age of Enlightenment”
3. Carol GUARNIERI, University of Virginia, “Creating a Digital Companion to Global Networks of Enlightenment: ‘The Digital Eighteenth Centuries’ on mapscholar.org”
4. Cynthia WALL, University of Virginia, and David GIES, University of Virginia, “Editing Global Networks of Enlightenment

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Networks and Practices of Connoisseurship in the Global Eighteenth Century
Friday, 4:00–5:00
Chairs: Kristel SMENTEK, MIT, and Valérie KOBI, Universität Hamburg
1. Ünver RÜSTEM, Johns Hopkins University, “Connoisseurship and the Art of Synthesis in Eighteenth-Century Istanbul: Ottoman Engagements with Western Architectural Books and Prints”
2. Michele MATTEINI, New York University, “Western Painting Inside Out: Pak Chiwon and the Connoisseurship of Western Painting in Eighteenth-Century East Asia”
3. Elizabeth Saari BROWNE, MIT, “Discernment or Devotion: Egypt and Sculptural Politics in Eighteenth-Century France”

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Art Professions
Friday, 5:10–6:10
Chair: Carole PAUL, University of California, Santa Barbara
1. Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville, “Terminology and its Limitations”
2. Anne Nellis RICHTER, Independent Scholar, “‘Yr Obedient, Grateful, and Dutiful Servant’: Hierarchies of Work in a Private Art Gallery”
3. Rachel HARMEYER, Rice University, “Emulating Angelica: Decorative and Amateur Art after Kauffman”
4. Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College, “From Connoisseur to Professional: The Metamorphosis of Art Criticism”

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ASECS Listening Session
Friday, 5:10–6:10
Presiding: Nyree GRAY, ASECS Ombuds and Associate Vice President / Chief Civil Rights Officer, Claremont McKenna College
The many ASECS members who have recently contacted the Executive Board are concerned about a range of issues regarding the Society. Therefore, the Board has decided to devote the Friday plenary to a Listening Session, along with this evening slot. Through these meetings, members can help develop an agenda for a Town Hall Meeting, to be held on April 23.

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S A T U R D A Y ,  1 0  A P R I L  2 0 2 1

The 37th James L. Clifford Memorial Lecture
Anne LAFONT, École des hautes études en sciences sociales de Paris (EHESS), Winckelmann Congo: Blackness in the Age of White Marble
Saturday, 11:30–12:30
Presiding: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida

This lecture will address the rise of African Art History—in the broadest sense—during the long eighteenth-century. During this period, notions of African art and its history were entangled with the idea of diasporic Africa or Blackness, as conceptualized by a diverse ensemble of European textual sources, most of them not concerned with art. The line of argument to be pursued here is that many of these early modern texts, ought, nonetheless, to be understood as a historical discourse on art—whether they describe African geography, natural history or commerce; narrate African history or catalogue its objects in Cabinets de Curiosités. Of course, these narratives, which are more or less connected with African material culture and ritual performances, eventually would be articulated in art theoretical publications properly speaking, as eighteenth-century authors such as abbé du Bos or Winckelmann began to include Africa in their ambition to write a comprehensive, comparative art history grounded on a climatic explanation of style. This approach to art history understood artistic style, form and content as products of the natural climate and atmosphere in which art was created. Recent scholarship has demonstrated the centrality of Whiteness to archeology’s emergence in the mid-eighteenth century. Adding to our understanding of the racial implications of whiteness and color in art history, this lecture will show, how, at the very same historical moment, Blackness was being constructed, both as a counterpart to Whiteness but also, more generally as a means of inscribing African rites and objects into the domain of European Fine Arts.

The Clifford Lecture series honors James L. Clifford, founder of the Johnsonian News-Letter, biographer of Samuel Johnson, and third President of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. The first lecture was presented in 1984 and since 1987 the Clifford Lecture has been delivered at every ASECS Annual Meeting.

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The Enlightened Mind: Education in the Long Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 1:20–2:20
Chairs: Karissa BUSHMAN, Quinnipiac University, and Amanda STRASIK, Eastern Kentucky University
1. Franny BROCK, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Madame de Genlis’ ‘New Method’ and Teaching Drawing to Children in Eighteenth-Century France”
2. Dorothy JOHNSON, University of Iowa, “Bodies of Knowledge? Teaching Anatomy to Artists in Enlightenment France”
3. Madeline SUTHERLAND-MEIER, University of Texas, Austin, “Raising and Educating Children in Eighteenth-Century Spain: Padre Sarmiento’s Discurso sobre el método que debia guardarse en la primera educación de la juventud
4. Brigitte WELTMAN-ARON, University of Florida, “Exercising Body and Mind in Madame d’Epinay’s Conversations d’Emilie

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Anne Schroder New Scholars Session (HECAA)
Saturday, 2:50–3:50
Chair: Susanna CAVIGLIA, Duke University
1. Isabel BALDRICH, University of Iowa, “Black Skin, White Hands: Ambivalence in Girodet’s Portrait of Belley”
2. Alicia CATICHA, Northwestern University, “Sculpting Whiteness: Marble, Porcelain, and Sugar in Eighteenth-Century Peru”
3. Xena FITZGERALD, Southern Methodist University, “Between Frame and Stage: Viewing a Historical Marriage in Eighteenth-Century”
4. Philippe HALBERT, Yale University, “La Belle Créole: Identity, Race, and the Dressing Table in the French Atlantic World”

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HECAA Business Meeting
Saturday, 3:55–4:55

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Do-Overs: Repetition and Revision
Saturday, 5:00–6:00
Chair: Elizabeth MANSFIELD, Penn State University
1. Servanne WOODWARD, University of Western Ontario, “Transitions from Rococo to Neo-Classical Illustration with Moreau le jeune”
2. Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University, “Jean-Baptiste Oudry and Canine Repetition”
3. Daniella BERMAN, New York University, “‘d’après David’: Variations on Portraiture”
4. Wendy BELLION, University of Delaware, “The Eighteenth Brumaire of King George III”

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S U N D A Y ,  1 1  A P R I L  2 0 2 1

Material Forms
Sunday, 11:00–noon
Chair: Chloe WIGSTON SMITH, University of York
1. David A. BREWER, The Ohio State University, “Charles II in Aurangabad”
2. Allison LEIGH, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, “Cultural Bilingualism in Eighteenth-Century Russian Portraiture”
3. Laura AURICCHIO, Fordham University, “French Accents: Picturing the Mechanical Arts in Early Republican New York”

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Mineralogy and Artful Metamorphosis
Sunday, 12:10–1:10
Chairs: Tara ZANARDI, Hunter College, CUNY, and Christina LINDEMAN, University of Southern Alabama
1. Elisabeth C. RIVARD, University of Virginia, “The Handheld Wunderkammer: Mineralogical Snuffboxes in the Enlightenment”
2. Jennifer GERMANN, Ithaca College, “Peaches and Pearls: Materializing Metaphors of Race in Eighteenth-Century British Art”
4. Eleanore NEUMANN, University of Virginia, “Maria Graham’s Landscapes following the 1822 Valparaiso Earthquake”

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Raw: Materials, Merchants, and Movement
Sunday, 2:30–3:30
Chair: Brittany LUBERDA, Baltimore Museum of Art
1. Sophie TUNNEY, Graduate Center, CUNY, “The Global Journey of Potted Plants and Seeds: The French Botanical Network between l’Isle de France and Cayenne”
2. Cynthia KOK, Yale University, “The Plastic Shell: Mother-of-Pearl and Material Literacy in Early Modern Europe”
3. Sarah COHEN, SUNY Albany, “Sugar, Silver, and Enslaved Labor Staged for the French Elite”

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The Visual Gothic
Sunday, 4:00–5:00
Chair: Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College
1. Aurélien DAVRIUS, ENSA Paris-Malaquais, “Jacques-François Blondel, an Admirer of Gothic Religious Architecture”
2. Elizabeth HORNBECK, University of Missouri, “The Vetusta Monumenta and the Eighteenth-Century Remediation of Gothic Architecture”
3. Pamela WEIDMAN, University of California, Berkeley, “‘Imperfect gleam of moonshine’: Beholding Gothic Objects in Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto
4. Shao-wei HUANG, SUNY Buffalo, “The Unexpected Image of the Gothic: The Epistemological Link Between The Castle of Otranto and A Tale of a Tub

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Workshop: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS
Sunday, 5:10–6:10
Chairs: Erica HAYES, Villanova University, and Kacie WILLS, Illinois College
This workshop will provide participants with the technical skills to align geographic coordinates to a digitized historical map from the eighteenth century in order to create a georeferenced historical map. Participants will learn how to use simple tools like Map Warper, an open source image georeferencer tool, in order to overlay the digitized historical map on top of a GIS modern basemap for comparison and use in an interactive web mapping application. This workshop is ideal for scholars working with historical maps or interested in learning digital humanities GIS skills. No prior GIS or mapping experience is required.

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Experiencing the Past: Bringing Collections to Life through Experiment and Reconstruction
Sunday, 5:10–6:10
Chair: Al COPPOLA, John Jay College, CUNY
1. Emily BECK, Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, Bentley GILLMAN, Tattersall Distilling, Jon KRIEDLER, Tattersall Distilling, Nicole LaBOUFF, Minneapolis Institute of Art, “Alcohol’s Empire: Distilled Spirits in the 1700s
Atlantic World”
2. Christine E. GRIFFITHS, Bard Graduate Center, “Distilling Gardens and (Re)Materializing Eighteenth-Century Perfumes”
3. Anna CHEN, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA, and Marguerite HAPPE, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA, “‘Bad Taste’: A Pedagogy of Public-Facing Recipe Revival”

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Note (added 6 April 2021) — The original version of the posting did not include information on the HECAA business meeting.