Enfilade

ASECS 2014, Williamsburg

2014 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Williamsburg, 19–22 March 2014
800px-Colonial_Williamsburg_Governors_Palace_Front_Dscn7232

Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg, Virginia. The original structure was built between
1710 and 1722, with further additions made in the 1750s. Fire destroyed the
main house in 1781. The present building was constructed in the early 1930s.
Photo by Larry Pieniazek, 2006, from Wikimedia Commons.

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The 2014 ASECS conference takes place in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, March 19–22, at the Williamsburg Lodge. HECAA will be represented by two panels, on Friday, chaired by Denise Amy Baxter and Amy Freund and Jessica Fripp. Our annual luncheon and business meeting is also scheduled for Friday, between the two sessions. A selection of additional panels is included below (of the 221 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full program, see the ASECS website.

H E C A A S E S S I O N S

The Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session (HECAA)
Friday, 21 March, 11:30–1:00, Colony Room A
Chair: Denise Amy BAXTER, University of North Texas
1. Diane WOODIN, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Noble Wit and Celestial Wonder in Early Modern France: The Strategic Scholarship of the Duchesse du Maine”
2. Blair DAVIS, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Roman Villas and French Garden Theory”
3. Alison HAFERA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Quiet Spaces of Repose: The Garden as Site of Mourning in Eighteenth-Century France”

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Selfhood and Visual Representation in the Eighteenth Century (HECAA)
Friday, 21 March, 4:15–5:45, Allegheny Room A
Chairs: Amy FREUND, Texas Christian University AND Jessica FRIPP, Parsons The New School for Design
1. Emma BARKER, The Open University, “Blindness and Selfhood in Eighteenth-Century French Art”
2. Melina MOE, Yale University, “The Singular Macaroni or Macaroni Singularity”
3. Julia SIENKEWICZ, Duquesne University, “At Sea without a Guiding Star: Uncertain Selfhood in the Atlantic Watercolors of Benjamin Henry Latrobe”

O T H E R S E S S I O N S R E L A T E D T O T H E V I S U A L A R T S

W E D N E S D A Y , 1 9 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

Open House, Swem Library at the College of William and Mary
Wednesday, 19 March, 4:00–6:00
The Swem Library is noted for its strong special collections. Come to the Special Collections Research Center and browse selected rare books, manuscripts, and archives pulled specifically for the enjoyment of ASECS. Some of the treasures on display will be a unique first edition of Isaac Newton’s Principia, a first edition of the Book of Mormon, a list of slaves owned by the College of William and Mary, as well as letters from some of our founding fathers, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe. All attendees and their guests are welcome and no registration is required.

T H U R S D A Y , 2 0 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

Textiles in the Long Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 20 March, 8:00–9:30, Allegheny Room B
Chair: Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville
1. Courtney BEGGS, Bridgewater State University, “Reading Ribbons: Textile Tokens, The Foundling Hospital, and Stories of Maternity”
2. Emily WEST, McMaster University, “‘Hands without head would do little’: Mechanizing the Spinster”
3. Mei Mei RADO, Bard Graduate Center, “‘Western Tapestries’ Made in the Eighteenth-Century Chinese Court”
4. Ji Eun YOU, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Printed Fabrics and Textile on Prints: Interior Decoration during the French Revolution”

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Mind and Brain: Representing Cognition in Eighteenth-Century Culture
Thursday, 20 March, 8:00–9:30, Virginia Room C
Chair: Hannah Doherty HUDSON, University of Texas, San Antonio
1. Audrey HUNGERPILLER, University of South Carolina, “Clarissa’s Suffering: Theorizing Sympathy and Physical Pain in the Eighteenth Century”
2. Lucas HARDY, Youngstown State University, “‘Beatific Visions of God’: Jonathan Edwards’s Postures of Mind”
3. Stan BOOTH, University of Winchester, “Subtle Gestures: The Portrayal of the Ill and Less Able in Hogarth’s Work”
Respondent: Natalie PHILLIPS, Michigan State University

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Embodying the Past: The Rewards and Risks of Re-enactment
Thursday, 20 March, 9:45–11:15, Allegheny Room B
Chair: Mimi HELLMAN, Skidmore College
1. Sarah DAY-O’CONNELL, Knox College, “Singing as Translation: A ‘New Fidelity’ Approach to Performance and Meaning in Joseph Haydn’s Canzonettas
2. Amber LUDWIG, Honolulu Museum of Art, “Re-Acting to the Past: Are Role-Playing Games Changing the Course of History?”
3. Matthew KEAGLE, Bard Graduate Center for the Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture, “Coming Out of the (Costume) Closet: Re-Enactment, the Academy, and Me”

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Hogarth’s Legacy
Thursday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Allegheny Room C
Chair: Frédéric OGÉE, Université Paris Diderot
1. Isabelle BAUDINO, Ecole Normale Supérieure Lyon, “William Hogarth, Appropriation and the Construction of British Artistic Identity”
2. Frank FELSENSTEIN, Ball State University, “Hogarth’s Legacy: Does Rowlandson Fit?”
3. David A. BREWER, The Ohio State University, “Hogarth, Fictionality, and Reference”

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National Endowment for the Humanities Grants Projects (Roundtable)
Thursday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Colony Room A
Chair: Barbara ASHBROOK, National Endowment for the Humanities
1. Stephen KARIAN, University of Missouri
2. Chloe WIGSTON SMITH, University of Georgia
3. Devoney LOOSER, Arizona State University

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Ear, Nose, and Throat: The Other Senses of the Long British Eighteenth Century, I
Thursday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Colony Room C
Chair: Rivka SWENSON, Virginia Commonwealth University
1. Kathryn Strong HANSEN, The Citadel, “‘Smell a rat’: Scent and Authenticity in Burney’s Cecilia
2. Jacqueline GRAINGER, University of Sydney, “Perfume in Print; or, the Legend of the French perfume Industry”
3. Christine GRIFFITHS, Bard Graduate Center, “‘A most pleasant Odiferous scent’: Aromatics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain”
4. Emily C. FRIEDMAN, Auburn University, “One Scent Three Ways: Imagining the Eighteenth Century as the Age of Sulfur”

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Six Metaphors for the Mind (Roundtable)
Thursday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Piedmont Room C
Chair: Brad PASANEK, University of Virginia
1. Darryl P. DOMINGO, University of Memphis, “Archer’s Bow”
2. Joseph DRURY, Villanova University, “Musical Instrument”
3. Scott ENDERLE, Skidmore College, “Mazes”
4. Jess KEISER, Rice University, “Soldiers”
5. Kathleen LUBEY, St. John’s University, “Acorns”
6. Julie PARK, Vassar College, “Camera Obscura”

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Eighteenth-Century Brewing
Thursday, 20 March, 2:30–4:00, Virginia Room C
Chair: Frank CLARK, Supervisor, Historic Foodways, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
(Fee for Tasting)

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Material Culture in the Atlantic World
Thursday, 20 March, 2:30–4:00, Allegheny Room A
Chair: Chloe WIGSTON SMITH, University of Georgia
1. Christian J. KOOT, Towson University, “From Manuscript to Print: The Transformation of an Early Modern Atlantic Map”
2. Kalissa HENDRICKSON, Arizona State University, “Imperial Commodities in Civic Pageantry”
3. Elizabeth A. WILLIAMS, Rhode Island School of Design Museum, “Fluid Contents: Navigating Material Culture in the Atlantic World”

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Materials, Artistic Process, and Meaning in the Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, Allegheny Room C
Chairs: Sarah BETZER, University of Virginia AND Douglas FORDHAM, University of Virginia
1. Jason LAFOUNTAIN, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, “The Art-Experienced Wound and Nailhole Painting of the Moravian Brethren: Irrationality and Medium Specificity in the 1740s”
2. Francesca WHITLUM-COOPER, Courtauld Institute of Art, “La vie errante de Jean-Baptiste Perronneau (1715–1783): Pastel, Peregrinations and Instability in Eighteenth-Century Europe”
3. Melissa HYDE, University of Florida, “Pastel Trouble: The Matter of Rosalba Carriera and Quentin de La Tour”
4. Amelia RAUSER, Franklin and Marshall College, “Muslin, Marble, Ivory”

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Global Cities, I
Thursday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, Liberty Room
Chair: Robert MARKLEY, University of Illinois
1. Andrew SCHULZ, Pennsylvania State University, “The Royal Botantical Garden and the ‘Recreation’ of Empire in Enlightenment Madrid”
2. Susan SPENCER, University of Central Oklahoma, “Scheming Capitalists and Suicidal Puppets: A Literature for Osaka in the Era of Edo”
3. Inhye HA, University of Illinois, “Autonomy and Gentility in Olaudah Equiano’s Eighteenth-Century American Waterfront Communities
4. Nina Budabin MCQUOWN, Western University, Ontario, “Urban Farming: ‘Town Manures’ in Eighteenth-Century Soil and City”

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Eighteenth-Century Re-enactments
Thursday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, Tidewater Room D
Chair: Sarah KAREEM, University of California, Los Angeles
1. Emily Hodgson ANDERSON, University of Southern California, “Ghosting Oroonoko”
2. Stuart SHERMAN, Fordham University, “Do Do Do What You’ve Done Done Done Before: Theatrical Reenactments and the Live Documentary”
3. Jessica LEIMAN, Carleton College, “‘The Enthusiasm of an Ingenuous Mind’: Reenacting La Nouvelle Héloïse”s
4. Chloe WIGSTON SMITH, University of Georgia, “Reenacting the Empire of Material Culture: Yinka Shonibare, Dutch Wax Prints, and Thomas Gainsborough”

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ASECS Members’ Reception
Thursday, 20 March, 6:00–7:00, Colony Room D&E

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F R I D A Y , 2 1 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

Cultures of the Machine
Friday, 21 March, 8:00–9:30, Colony Room A
Chair: Joseph DRURY, Villanova University
1. Amy FREUND, Texas Christian University, “‘The most beautiful of all inventions’: The Hunting Gun in Eighteenth-Century France”
2. Crystal B. LAKE, Wright State University, “Romantic Fictions and Dull Truths: Machines of War in the Long Eighteenth Century”
3. Christopher F. LOAR, Western Washington University, “Erasmus Darwin’s Machinery of Life

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New Approaches to Eighteenth-Century Gardens
Friday, 21 March, 9:45–11:15, Allegheny Room C
Chairs: Jeffrey L. COLLINS, Bard Graduate Center AND Meredith MARTIN, New York University
1. Nicolle JORDAN, University of Southern Mississippi, “‘Her Fountains which so high their streames extend’: Garden Design and Gender Identity in the Poetry of Anne Finch”
2. Emily MANN, Courtauld Insitute of Art, “Designs on the Land: English Gardens on the Coast of West Africa”
3. Sally GRANT, Independent Scholar, “Caricature in the Garden: Encounters with the Dwarves at Villa Valmarana”
4. Julie Anne PLAX, University of Arizona, “The Hunting Park at Compiègne: Aesthetics, Economics, Environment, and Entertainment”

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Dissent, Protest, and Resistance in the Old and New World
Friday, 21 March, 9:45–11:15, Allegheny Room B
Chair: Gloria EIVE, Saint Mary’s College of California
1. Frieda KOENINGER, Sam Houston State University, “Don Santos Díez González, Civil Censor: Balancing Aesthetics, Politics, and Religion in 1790s Madrid”
2. Maria Soledad BARBÓN, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “The Politics of Praise: Academic Culture and Viceregal Power in Late Colonial Peru”
3. María de las Nieves PUJALTE, Texas State University, San Marcos, “Poder y resistencia en las fronteras españolas en 1748 y en 1826—Testimonios en las obras de los viajeros Jorge Juan Cantacilia y Antonio de Ulloa”
4. Ramón Bárcena COLINA, Universidad de Oviedo y Universidad Complutense de Madrid, “Imperialism, Censorship, and Control in post-Napoleonic Spain and the European Empire: Francisco Goya y Lucientes’s Dissent

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Graduate Student Mentoring Coffee
Opportunity for graduate students to meet with their assigned mentors
Friday, 21 March, 9:45–11:15, Heritage Room

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The Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session (HECAA)
Friday, 21 March, 11:30–1:00, Colony Room A
Chair: Denise Amy BAXTER, University of North Texas
1. Diane WOODIN, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Noble Wit and Celestial Wonder in Early Modern France: The Strategic Scholarship of the Duchesse du Maine”
2. Blair DAVIS, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Roman Villas and French Garden Theory”
3. Alison HAFERA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Quiet Spaces of Repose: The Garden as Site of Mourning in Eighteenth-Century France”

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Regimes of Visuality: Technologies of Vision (Science Studies Caucus)
Friday, 21 March, 11:30–1:00, Colony Room C
Chair: Jess KEISER, Rice University
1. Al COPPOLA, John Jay College, City University of New York, “Seeing Science”
2. Kevin CHUA, Texas Tech University, “Children’s Scientific Literature and the Cybernetic Example”
3. Susan LIBBY, Rollins College, “Rationalizing Colonialism, Mapping Slavery in the Encyclopedie Illustrations of New World Plantation Labor”
4. Alexander WRAGGE-MORLEY, Caltech and Huntington Library, “Writing as Visual Technology in Natural History and Natural Philosophy”

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HECAA Luncheon and Business Meeting
Friday, 21 March, 1:00–2:30, Virginia A

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Presidential Address, Awards Presentation, and ASECS Business Meeting
Friday, 21 March, 2:30–4:00, Virginia Room E&F
Joseph ROACH Yale University, “Invisible Cities and the Archeology of Dreams”
Presiding: Misty ANDERSON University of Tennessee, Knoxville

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Selfhood and Visual Representation in the Eighteenth Century (HECAA)
Friday, 21 March, 4:15–5:45, Allegheny Room A
Chairs: Amy FREUND, Texas Christian University AND Jessica FRIPP, Parsons The New School for Design
1. Emma BARKER, The Open University, “Blindness and Selfhood in Eighteenth-Century French Art”
2. Melina MOE, Yale University, “The Singular Macaroni or Macaroni Singularity”
3. Julia SIENKEWICZ, Duquesne University, “At Sea without a Guiding Star: Uncertain Selfhood in the Atlantic Watercolors of Benjamin Henry Latrobe”

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Exhibition Lecture, Threads of Feeling
Friday, 21 March, 5:00, Hennage Auditorium, Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg
John STYLES, University of Hertfordshire, “Threads of Feeling: Foundlings, Philanthropy, and Textiles in Eighteenth-Century London”
When mothers left babies at London’s Foundling Hospital in the mid- eighteenth century, the Hospital often retained a small object as a means of identification, usually a piece of fabric. These swatches of fabric now form Britain’s largest collection of everyday textiles from the eighteenth century. They include the whole range of fabrics worn by ordinary women, along with ribbons, embroidery, and even baby clothes. Each scrap of fabric reflects the lives of an infant child and its absent parent. Collectively, they comprise a poignant, elegiac materialization of separation and loss. The lecture explains why the Foundling Hospital amassed these textiles and reflects on the capacity of such objects to perform emotional work. The exhibition Threads of Feeling, curated by John Styles, is at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum, in the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg. Limited numbers, pre-registration required. Register at the ASECS Registration Desk by 4:00.

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Women’s Caucus Masquerade Ball
Friday, 21 March, 9:00–12:00, Colony Room
Admission fee includes dessert and coffee; cash bar will be available

S A T U R D A Y , 2 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

Napoléon and the Art of Propaganda
Saturday, 22 March, 8:00–9:30, Allegheny Room A
Chair: Heidi KRAUS, Hope College
1. Wayne HANLEY, West Chester University, “General Bonaparte and His Artists: Appiani, Gros, and David”
2. Carole F. MARTIN, Texas State University, “Crossing the Alps: The Advent of the Napoleonic Era”
3. Heather MCPHERSON, University of Alabama at Birmingham, “The Napoleon Effect”
4. Susanne ANDERSON-RIEDEL, University of New Mexico, “Alexandre Tardieu’s Interpretation of Raphael’s Modernity for Napoleonic Art”

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Reproducing the Past in the Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 22 March, 8:00–9:30, Piedmont Room A
Chair: Alicia KERFOOT, The College at Brockport, State University of New York
1. Amy MALLORY-KANI, University at Albany, State University of New York, “‘These Perilous Times’: (Re)Inventing the (Early) Modern Woman in Mary Hays’s Female Biography”
2. Niall ATKINSON AND Susanna CAVIGLIA, University of Chicago, “The Eternal Modernity of Rome: The Poetics of the Past in French Eighteenth-Century Painting”
3. Susan EGENOLF, Texas A&M University, “The Arts of Etruria Reborn in Industrial England: Wedgwood’s Classical Aesthetic”

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Historical Reenactment, Living History, and Public History: Theorizing Generative Intersections between Tourists, Communities and Scholars” (Society of Early Americanists)
Saturday, 22 March, 9:45–11:15, Allegheny Room A
Chair: Joy A. J. HOWARD, Saint Joseph’s University
1. Michael TWITTY, Independent Food Historian and Interpreter, “‘No More Whistling Walk For Me,’ Historian and Food Interpreter”
2. Sara HARWOOD, Georgia State University, “Escaping the ‘Tourist Trap’: Recent Endeavors of the Witch House in Salem, Massachusetts”
3. Russell Taylor STOERMER, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and the College of William and Mary, “Researching History for Living History Programs”
4. Tyler PUTNAM, University of Delaware, “Historic Trades Skills, Historical Scholarship, and Living History Interpretation”
5. Susan KERN, The College of William and Mary, “Students as Tourists, Critics, and Neighbors: Teaching Public History at William and Mary”
6. Janet S. ZEHR, Salem College, “Embodied and Disembodied Voices: Modes of Interpretation of Black and White Experience at Old Salem, North Carolina”
7. Wayne RANDOLPH, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, “Where the Rubber Hits the Road: Bridging Academia to ‘The Masses’”

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Rousseau and the Visual
Saturday, 22 March, 9:45–11:15, Colony Room A
Chair: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida
1. John GREENE, University of Louisville, “Optical Allusions: Text and Image in Rousseau”
2. Brigitte WELTMAN-ARON, University of Florida, “Justice Disfigured: Rousseau’s Manuscript of Les Rêveries du promeneur solitaire
3. Lauren CANNADY, Centre allemand d’histoire de l’art, Paris, “Between Reveries and Seduction: Rousseau in the Garden”

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Celebrating ‘Our King’ in an Age of Enlightenment: Commemorating Monarchs in Music, Print and Every Day Life in the British Atlantic World
Saturday, 22 March, 9:45–11:15, Tidewater Room B
Chair: Amanda E. HERBERT, Christopher Newport University
1. Anne WOHLCKE, California State University, Pomona, “The King at the Head of the Army: Commemorating King George II as a hero of the Austrian War of Succession”
2. Stephanie KOSCAK, University of California, Los Angeles, “Playing with Pictures of the King: Print Consumers, Royal Authority, and Aesthetic Vacuity”
3. Birte PFLEGER, California State University, Los Angeles, “Celebrating George II and Frederick the Great: Creating an Anglo-German Middle Ground in Colonial Pennsylvania”

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Gallery Talk, Threads of Feeling
Saturday, 22 March, 10:00, DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum
John STYLES, University of Hertfordshire, will discuss the ideas that shaped his exhibition Threads of Feeling in the gallery where it is displayed. Limited numbers, pre-register at ASECS registration desk.

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Beyond Goya: Culture High and Low in Spain and the New World during the Reign of Carlos IV 1789–1808 (Ibero-American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies)
Saturday, 22 March, 2:00–3:30, Colony Room A
Chair: Janis A. TOMLINSON, University of Delaware
1. Liana EWALD, San Diego University, “Culture, Gender, National Society: Women in the Cartas Marruecase
2. Kelly DONAHUE-WALLACE, University of North Texas, “Jerónimo Antonio Gil, Laocoön’s Son, and the Spanish Enlightenment
3. Catherine JAFFE, Texas State University, “From Cape and Dagger to Didactic Novel: Molding Taste during the Reign of Carlos IV, or Count Belflor Lives to Fight Another Day”
4. Susan DEANS-SMITH, University of Texas at Austin, “Consuming Culture in Late Colonial Mexico City”

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Let’s Get Engaged!: Teaching Tradition in a Non-Traditional Classroom (Women’s Caucus)
Saturday, 22 March, 2:00–3:30, Colony Room C
Chairs: Heather KING, University of Redlands AND Srividhya SWAMINATHAN, Long Island University
1. Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville, “Transforming Exclusion into Inclusion”
2. Laura LINKER, High Point University, “Engaging Bodies: Teaching the Restoration”
3. Kathleen ALVES, City University of New York, “Teaching Swift, Sex, and Race in the Two-Year College”
4. Glen COLBURN, Morehead State University, “Civilization and its Discontents in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain”

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Rhyme or Reason? The Aesthetics of Prayer (German Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies / Deutsche Gesellschaft für die Erforschung des 18. Jahrhunderts, DGEJ)
Saturday, 22 March, 2:00–3:30, Liberty Room
Chairs: Laura M. STEVENS, University of Tulsa AND Sabine VOLK-BIRKE, Martin-Luther-University, Halle
1. James A. WINN, Boston University, “Intimations of Jubilation: Christopher Smart’s Early Religious Poems”
2. Karissa E. BUSHMAN, Augustana College, “From Devotion to Mindless Adoration: Depictions of Prayer and Worship in Goya’s Works”
3. Michael ROTENBERG-SCHWARTZ, New Jersey City University, “Representing Prayer in English Travel Narratives”
4. Malinda SNOW, Georgia State University, “Isaac Watts’s Book of Common Prayer

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Pop! Goes the Eighteenth Century
Saturday, 22 March, 2:00–3:30, Piedmont Room A
Chair: Guy SPIELMANN, Georgetown University
1. Dorothée POLANZ, University of Virginia, “Merchandizing Queen: Marie Antoinette, 1793–2013”
2. Kimberly CHRISMAN-CAMPBELL, Independent Scholar, “Lost at Sea: Ship Hats in Contemporary Fashion”
3. Alaina PINCUS, University of Illinois, “Austen’s Caché and the Twenty-First-Century Popular Romance”

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Gallery Talk, Threads of Feeling
Saturday, 22 March, 2:00, DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum
John STYLES, University of Hertfordshire, will discuss the ideas that shaped his exhibition Threads of Feeling in the gallery where it is displayed. Limited numbers, pre-register at ASECS registration desk.

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Migration, Society and the ‘Exceptional’ Gulf Coast
Saturday, 22 March, 3:45–5:15, Allegheny Room A
Chair: Susan GAUNT STEARNS, Northwestern University
1. Gordon SAYRE, University of Oregon, “The Mississippi Bubble and the Settling of Louisiana: Perspectives from the Memoir of Lieutenant Dumont”
2. Frances KOLB, Vanderbilt University, “Migration in Spanish Louisiana during the Years of Partition, 1763–1783”
3. Judith BONNER, The Historic New Orleans Collection, “From Sketches to Portraits: The Rise of Painting along the Gulf of Mexico in the Eighteenth-Century”
4. Kristin CONDOTTA, Tulane University, “A Taste of Home: Irish Foodways in Early New Orleans”

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Artistic Matters of Life and Death in Anatomical Study: Live Models, Cadavers and Ecorche Figures
Saturday, 22 March, 3:45–5:15, Allegheny Room B
Chair: Andrew GRACIANO, University of South Carolina
1. Josh HAINY, University of Iowa, “John Flaxman’s Anatomical Drawings: The Body as Theoretical Model”
2. Meredith GAMER, Yale University, “Tyburn’s Docile Bodies: Criminal Anatomies in Eighteenth-Century London”
3. Corinna WAGNER, University of Exeter, “Artists, Anatomists, and the Transparent Body: Categorical Impulse and Human Identity”
Respondent: Rebecca MESSBARGER, Washington University in St. Louis

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Antiquarianism (in Theory)
Saturday, 22 March, 3:45–5:15, Piedmont Room C
Chairs: Crystal B. LAKE, Wright State University AND Ruth MACK, State University of New York, Buffalo
1. Craig HANSON, Calvin College, “From Ancient Paintings to Illustrious Persons: Antiquarian Patronage and Illustration in the 1740s”
2. Joshua SWIDZINSKI, Columbia University, “Thomas Gray’s Unfinished History of English Poetry: Metrical Antiquarianism and the Problem of Literary History”
3. Jeff STRABONE, Connecticut College, “The Case of Robert of Gloucester’s Chronicle: Towards a Theory of Mediation in the Eighteenth Century”

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Eighteenth-Century Book Illustration, the Engraved Author Portrait, and the Formation of the Literary Canon
Saturday, 22 March, 3:45–5:15, Tidewater Room C
Chair: Kwinten VAN DE WALLE, Ghent University
1. Peter WAGNER, Universität Koblenz-Landau, “Swift’s Parody of Author Portraits
2. Gerald EGAN, California State University, “Alexander Pope’s Master Hand
3. Enid VALLE, Kalamazoo College, “Before and after the Inquisition: Author’s Portrait and Text Illustrations of Pablo de Olavide’s El Evangelio en Triunfo
4. Geoffrey SILL, Rutgers University, “Versions of Defoe: Portraits of the Artist from His Works”

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Williamsburg Walking Tour, 1774
Saturday, 22 March, 3:45–5:15, departing from lobby of Colonial Williamsburg Conference Center
Led by William WARNER, University of California, Santa Barbara
This tour will highlight the events in Williamsburg Virginia between May 25th and June 1st, 1774, in the wake of news of the Boston Port Bill, which closed down Boston harbor as punishment for the destruction of the Tea in Boston Harbor the previous winter. The tour will begin at the Colonial Williamsburg Conference Center. You don’t need Williamsburg tickets because we will be walking by the outsides of key sites and buildings (not taking tours within them). We will use a time-line of key events, a map (provided by the tour guide, Professor Warner), as well as handouts from which participants will be able to read (perhaps even aloud!). The goal is to bring together place and political speech/writing so that we can consider how they work together to mediate the American Crisis during one week of 1774 in Williamsburg.

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