Enfilade

ASECS 2015, Los Angeles

mollcodfish

Herman Moll, To the Right Honourable John Lord Sommers…This Map of North America according to ye Newest and most Exact observations, 23 x 38 inches (London: H. Moll, ca. 1715). “California was depicted on maps as an island. . . even after Father Kino established its penisularity about 1705,” The Philadelphia Print Shop. The official date for the founding of the city of Los Angeles is September 4, 1781.

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2015 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Los Angeles, 19–21 March 2015

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Finished in 1976, the 35-story Westin Bonaventure Hotel is the largest hotel in the city, the work of John Portman, one of the world’s most influential hotel architects.

The 2015 ASECS conference takes place in Los Angeles, March 19–21, at the Westin Bonaventure. HECAA will be represented by two panels, on Friday, chaired by Amy Freund and Noémie Etienne and Meredith Martin. Our annual luncheon and business meeting is also scheduled for Friday. A selection of additional panels is included below (of the 221 sessions scheduled, many others will, of course, interest HECAA members). For the full program, see the ASECS website.

H E C A A  S E S S I O N S

Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session (HECAA)
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Santa Anita C
Chair: Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University
1. Iris MOON, Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Sedimentations of the Self: A Stratigraphic Reading of Maurice Quentin de La Tour’s Pastel Portraits of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Citizen of Geneva”
2. Joanna M. GOHMANN, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Woman’s Best Friend: The Visual Work of Madame de Pompadour’s Dogs”
3. Ashley BRUCKBAUER, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Ambassadeurs à la turc: Assimilation and Dissimulation in Eighteenth-Century Images of Franco-Ottoman Diplomacy”
4. Elizabeth Bacon EAGER, Harvard University, “Between Looking and Making: The Early Drawing Curriculum at West Point”

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Pilgrim Arts of the Eighteenth Century (HECAA)
Friday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, San Fernando
Chairs: Noémie ETIENNE, Institute of Fine Arts AND Meredith MARTIN, New York University and Institute of Fine Arts
1. David PULLINS, Harvard University, “Multiple Hands: Workshop Practice and Masters of Eighteenth-Century French Painting”
2. Dipti KHERA, New York University and Institute of Fine Arts, “Invitations to Travel: Circulating Pontiffs, Pilgrims and Pictures in the Bazaars of Early Modern India”
3. Kristel SMENTEK, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “Moving Across Media: The Mobile Image and Eighteenth-Century Sino-French Encounter”
4. Matthew FISK, Boston Architectural College, “A Vernacular Orientalism: Exoticizing Discourse and Amateur Japanning in the Northern Connecticut Frontier, 1725–1735”

 

O T H E R  S E S S I O N S  R E L A T E D  T O  T H E  V I S U A L  A R T S

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New Approaches to Material Culture
Thursday, 19 March, 8:00–9:30, San Gabriel B
Chair: Chloe WIGSTON SMITH, University of Georgia
1. Elizabeth Kowaleski WALLACE, Boston College, “The Things Things Don’t Say: Reconsidering the Rape of the Lock”
2. Karen LIPSEDGE, Kingston University, “Men at Home: Men, Domestic Space, and the Novels of Richardson”
3. Robbie RICHARDSON, University of Kent, “‘British valour, opposed to tomahawk cruelty’: First Nations Material Culture in the British Imaginary”
4. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, “Staging Desire: Performance, Memory, and Re-enactment in Thomas Lawrence’s Portraits of Sally, Sarah, and Maria Siddons”

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Fans and Fandoms in the Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 19 March, 8:00–9:30, Santa Barbara B
Chair: Kate HAMILTON, Carnegie Mellon University
1. Jade HIGA, Duquesne University, “Mary Crawford’s Fan(ny) Base: Fan Behavior and the Female Body of Austen’s Mansfield Park”
2. Stephanie KOSCAK, Wake Forest University, “The Monarchy in the Marketplace: Royal Signs and Loyalist Fandoms in Eighteenth-Century London”
3. Diana SOLOMON, Simon Fraser University, “The Quality of Fanfare: The Starring Role of Audiences in Eighteenth-Century London Theatre”
4. Whitney ARNOLD, University of California, Los Angeles, “Rousseau and His Fans: Celebrity and Autobiographical Representation”

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A Sum of Its Parts: Symmetry in the Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 19 March, 8:00–9:30, San Pedro
Chairs: Daniella BERMAN, New York University AND Changduk (Charles) KANG, Columbia University
1. Sarah GRANDIN, Harvard University, “Desportes’ Buffet à l’Orfèvrerie and Symmetrical Display”
2. Benjamin H. BAKER, University of Pennsylvania and Université de Paris IV – Sorbonne, “Retrospective Rewriting, Affective Symmetry and Dispositive Disarray in Prévost’s Cleveland”
3. Clare HAYNES, University of Tulsa, “A Beauteous Symmetry: The Expression of Godly Order in the Church of England, 1660–1800”

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The Eighteenth Century in Hollywood (ASECS Executive Board Sponsored Session)
Thursday, 19 March, 9:45–11:15, Catalina Ballroom
Chair: Kathleen WILSON, State University of New York, Stony Brook
1. Paula BYRNE, Advisor and Historian, “Belle”
2. Jeffrey HATCHER, Screenwriter, “The Duchess
3. Stella TILLYARD, Author and Historian, “Aristocrats, Tides of War, A Royal Affair

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Scientists, Artists, and Artisans in the Eighteenth Century
Thursday, 19 March, 2:30–4:00, La Cienega
Chair: Dena GOODMAN, University of Michigan
1. Hannah WILLIAMS, University of Oxford, “Artists and Scientists in the Churches of Paris”
2. Mia JACKSON, Queen Mary, University of London, “Illustrious Times: Clock-Makers and Cabinet-Makers in the Louvre”
3. Paola BERTUCCI, Yale University, “Savants, Artisans, and Artistes: The Société des Arts in Early-Eighteenth Century Paris”
4. Nina Rattner GELBART, Occidental College, “Mlle Biheron’s Cabinet, Mlle Basseporte’s Jardin: Savantes-artistes and their Spheres of Sociability”

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Empires and Oceans (Race and Empire Caucus) (Roundtable)
Thursday, 19 March, 4:15–5:45, Santa Barbara C
Chair: James MULHOLLAND, North Carolina State University
1. Betty JOSEPH, Rice University, “Piratical Discourse and the Interspaces of Empire”
2. Daniel J. O’QUINN, University of Guelph, “Theatrum Pacis: Where Does Peace Happen?”
3. Dwight CAREY, University of California, Los Angeles, “Trans-Colonial Style: The Architecture of Empire in Eighteenth-Century Louisiana and Mauritius”
4. Gretchen J. WOERTENDYKE, University of South Carolina, “Meditations on Critical Regionalism, the Sea, and Comparative Literary Studies”
5. Vanessa SMITH, University of Sydney, “Imperialism in Oceania”
6. Steven PINCUS, Yale University, “The Stamp Act in Global Perspective”

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Educating Women in France, 1780–1814
Friday, 20 March, 8:00–9:30, Santa Anita C
Chair: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida
1. Mary TROUILLE, Illinois State University, “Mme de Genlis’s Challenge to Rousseau’s Views on Female Education”
2. Sévérine SOFIO, CNRS-Université Paris 8, “L’intérêt social exige d’encourager l’émulation des femmes / Teaching Art to Women During the French Revolution: A National Issue?”
3. Susan TAYLOR-LEDUC, Parsons Paris The New School, “From Servant to Teacher: Madame Campan’s Vision for Educating Women”
4. Lindsay DUNN, Texas Christian University, “Educating an Empress: Art Education and Marie-Louise, House of Habsburg-Lorraine”

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The Cultures of Sport in the Eighteenth Century
Friday, 20 March, 8:00–9:30, San Fernando
Chair: Alexis TADIÉ, Université of Paris, Sorbonne
1. Sharon HARROW, Shippenburg University, “Satire and Ideology in Eighteenth-Century Sports Poetry”
2. John WHALE, University of Leeds, “The Culture of Eighteenth-Century Pugilism”
3. Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University, “Gun and Game: The Art of Shooting in Eighteenth-Century France”

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Textiles and the Long Eighteenth Century
Friday, 20 March, 8:00–9:30, Los Feliz
Chair: Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville
1. Kimberly CHRISMAN-CAMPBELL, Independent Scholar, “Borrowed Plumes: Feathered Textiles at the French Court”
2. Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College, “Tactility and Textiles in Portraits of Madame de Pompadour”
3. Emily M.N. KUGLER, Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, Brown University, “From Calico Madams to Osnaburg-Shrouded Slaves: Textiles for Laboring Women, 1719–1831”
4. Ashley SCHOPPE, University of Tulsa, “‘Richly Dressed in our Own Manufacture’: Public Perceptions of Princess Augusta’s Patronage of British Textiles”
Respondent: Lauren MISKIN, Southern Methodist University

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Teaching the Eighteenth Century: A Poster Session
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Santa Monica D
Chair: Diane KELLEY, University of Puget Sound
1. Caroline BREASHEARS, St. Lawrence University, “‘You’re an Austen Hero!’ Teaching about Masculinity in Jane Austen’s Novels”
2. Sharon HARROW, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, “Teaching Adaptations”
3. Heather KING, University of Redlands, “Mixing it Up: Balancing Curricular Options and Institutional Limits”
4. Elizabeth KRAFT, University of Georgia, “Restoration Courtship Comedies and Hollywood Comedies of Remarriage”
5. Heidi KRAUS, Hope College, “Women, Art, and Society in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century France: Engaging the Undergraduate Audience”
6. Crystal MATEY, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, “Depictions of Fictional Scientists in the Long Eighteenth-Century”
7. Sarah NICOLAZZO, University of California, San Diego, “Pirates, Pickpockets, Police: Teaching Law and Literature in the Eighteenth-Century Classroom”
8. Véronique OLIVIER AND Yelena LIEPERT, Chapman University, “The Representation and Role of Women in Eighteenth-Century Society”
9. Theresa Marie RUSS, University of California at Santa Barbara, “Teaching ‘Knowledge Work in the Long Eighteenth Century’: Visually, Aurally, Interactively”

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Alta and Baja: California in the Eighteenth Century (ASECS Executive Board Sponsored Session)
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Santa Barbara B
Chair: Pamela HUCKINS, Southern New Hampshire University
1. James MIDDLETON, Independent Scholar, “Dress in the Codex Pictoricus Mexicanus of Fr. Ignaz Tirsch, S.J.”
2. David RICHARDSON, Camino Real de las Misiones, “Mission Santa María de los Angeles, The Last Jesuit Mission of Baja California”
3. Yve CHAVEZ, University of California, Los Angeles, “Eighteenth-Century Accounts of Indigenous Art and Culture at the Alta California Missions”
4. Jonathan C. LAURSEN, University of California, Riverside, “The ‘Leyenda negra’ on the Pacific Coast”

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Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session (Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture)
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Santa Anita C
Chair: Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University
1. Iris MOON, Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Sedimentations of the Self: A Stratigraphic Reading of Maurice Quentin de La Tour’s Pastel Portraits of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Citizen of Geneva”
2. Joanna M. GOHMANN, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Woman’s Best Friend: The Visual Work of Madame de Pompadour’s Dogs”
3. Ashley BRUCKBAUER, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Ambassadeurs à la turc: Assimilation and Dissimulation in Eighteenth-Century Images of Franco-Ottoman Diplomacy”
4. Elizabeth Bacon EAGER, Harvard University, “Between Looking and Making: The Early Drawing Curriculum at West Point”

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Digging Italy (Italian Studies Caucus)
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, San Gabriel C
Chair: Wendy Wassyng ROWORTH, University of Rhode Island
1. Jeffrey COLLINS, Bard Graduate Center, “From Ditch to Nitch: Digging the Villa of Cassius”
2. Lauren DI SALVO, University of Missouri, “Unearthing Ancient Mosaics and their Translation into Contemporary Souvenirs”
3. Ulf R. HANSSON, University of Texas at Austin, “Non-Marrying Men and the Lure of Antiquity: Philipp von Stosch and his Florentine Museo”
4. Carolyn GUILE, Colgate University, “Warsaw’s Italy: Poland’s Last King and the Making of Royal Łazienki, 1764–1795”

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The Eighteenth Century on Film (Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies)
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Catalina Ballroom
Chair: John H. O’NEILL, Hamilton College
1. Dorothée POLANZ, University of Virginia, “Portrait of the Queen as a Celebrity: Marie Antoinette on Screen, 1934–2012”
2. Melissa BISSONETTE, St. John Fisher College, “‘Too light & bright & sparkling’: The BBC Pride and Prejudice and the Secret of Style”
3. Ellen MOODY, American University, “Screenplays and Shooting Scripts (not Novels) into Films”
4. Steven W. THOMAS, Wagner College, “The Assurance of Belle, the Insurance of the Zong, and the Speculation of Cinema”

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Epistolarity: Contested / ‘Contexted’ and Contextualized Letters, Part I
Friday, 20 March, 11:30–1:00, Santa Barbara A
Chair: Mark MALIN, Randolph-Macon College
1. Nina DUBIN, University of Illinois at Chicago, “Epistolarity at the Salon of 1793: Cicero, Moitte, Janinet”
2. Kelsey RUBIN-DETLEV, University of Oxford, “‘Elle a écrit de sa propre main’: Catherine the Great’s Letters in Periodicals and Polemics of Eighteenth-Century France”
3. Tamara L. HUNT, University of Southern Indiana, “Letters, Seditious Libel, and the Press in Early Eighteenth-Century England”
4. Shang-yu SHENG, City University of New York, Graduate Center, “Responding to Mr. Spectator: Communication Structures in The Spectator’s Hypertexts”

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HECAA Luncheon and Business Meeting
Friday, 20 March, 1:00–2:30, Beaudry B

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Pilgrim Arts of the Eighteenth Century (Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture)
Friday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, San Fernando
Chairs: Noémie ETIENNE, Institute of Fine Arts AND Meredith MARTIN, New York University and Institute of Fine Arts
1. David PULLINS, Harvard University, “Multiple Hands: Workshop Practice and Masters of Eighteenth-Century French Painting”
2. Dipti KHERA, New York University and Institute of Fine Arts, “Invitations to Travel: Circulating Pontiffs, Pilgrims and Pictures in the Bazaars of Early Modern India”
3. Kristel SMENTEK, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “Moving Across Media: The Mobile Image and Eighteenth-Century Sino-French Encounter”
4. Matthew FISK, Boston Architectural College, “A Vernacular Orientalism: Exoticizing Discourse and Amateur Japanning in the Northern Connecticut Frontier, 1725–1735”

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Twenty-First Century Approaches to Eighteenth-Century Quixotes and Quixotisms: Don Quijote II (1615–2015), Part I (Ibero-American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies)
Friday, 20 March, 4:15–5:45, La Cienega
Chair: Catherine JAFFE, Texas State University
1. Jonathan CRIMMINS, Augustana College, “The Worth in Every Clime: Historical Tincture in Harlequin and Quixotte: or The Magic Arm
2. Aaron R. HANLON, Georgetown University, “Quixotism as Global Heuristic”
3. Brittany LUBERDA, The Frick Collection, “Don Quixote by Charles-Antoine Coypel”
4. Elizabeth LEWIS, University of Mary Washington, “Maps, Travelers, and the ‘Real’ Don Quixote de la Mancha

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UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library Excursion
Friday, 20 March, 5:30–7:00, UCLA bus departs from the Westin Bonaventure Hotel at 5:00.
(Free bus transportation is limited to the first 50 people who register for this excursion)
Free for ASECS conference participants and their guests; please register by 6 March as capacity is limited.
This excursion is hosted by the UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library and Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies. It includes a private guided tour of the elegant Clark Library and presentations by the library staff about the collections. Following the tour, guests will enjoy a special reception. The bus will depart the Clark Library at 7:00 p.m. and return to the hotel.
For details about bus or rail transportation options, please visit http://www.metro.net
Free parking is available for those traveling by car or taxi. For directions or a Google map, visit http://www.clarklibrary.ucla.edu/visit
About the Clark Library
The Clark is an off-campus rare book library specializing in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It also has a renowned collection centering on Oscar Wilde and his era and significant holdings of modern fine printing and Western Americana. Other collections include French literature, a major collection devoted to Pietro Aretino, and a recent major gift strengthened considerably the Clark’s holdings of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century books. Currently the library has about 110,000 books, as well as manuscripts, archives, maps, prints, and other material. Bequeathed to UCLA in 1934 by William Andrews Clark, Jr. (1877–1934), a prominent book collector and philanthropist, this extensive collection is housed in an historical building standing on the spacious grounds of the old Clark estate in the West Adams district of Los Angeles (near downtown L.A.).
How to RSVP
To register, please send an email to c1718cs@humnet.ucla.edu with ‘ASECS- Clark Excursion’ in the subject line, and include the name, email, and phone number for each guest that will attend and indicate whether you need a bus reservation. The free bus transportation is limited to 50 people and reservations are provided on a first-come, first-served basis by email. The RSVP deadline is 6 March.

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The Habsburgs, 1740–1792, Part I
Saturday, 21 March, 8:00–9:30, Los Catalina Ballroom
Chair: Rebecca MESSBARGER, Washington University in St. Louis
1. Heather MORRISON, State University of New York, New Paltz, “International Scientific Competition and European Diplomatic Relations during the Habsburg Monarchy’s Botanical Expedition of 1783–1788”
2. Michael YONAN, University of Missouri, “Habsburg Artistic Exchange In and Out of the Austrian Netherlands”
3. Julia DOE, Columbia University, “Marie Antoinette et la Musique: Habsburg Patronage and French Musical Culture: 1770–1789”

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Classroom as Coffeehouse: Encouraging Critical Thinking and Debate in Discussion of Primary Sources
Saturday, 21 March, 8:00–9:30, San Gabriel B
Chair: Birte PFLEGER, California State University, Los Angeles
1. Sharlene SAYEGH, California State University, Long Beach, “Reading through the Chatter: Finding the Social in Eighteenth-Century Legal Records”
2. Anne WOHLCKE, California Polytechnic State University, Pomona, “Filtering Eighteenth-Century Content for Twenty-First Century Consumption: Teaching Enlightenment through the Lens of an English Coffeehouse”
3. Kristen CHIEM, Pepperdine University, “Lessons from the Garden: Discussing Gender in Eighteenth-Century Chinese Art”

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Form and Feeling: Materiality in Eighteenth-Century History and Literature
Saturday, 21 March, 8:00–9:30, San Fernando
Chairs: Lisa Foreman CODY, Claremont McKenna College AND Julie PARK, California Institute of Technology and Vassar College
1. Sarah ERON, University of Rhode Island, “Misrecognition: The Case of Evelina”
2. Dahlia PORTER, University of North Texas, Denton, “Feeling the Archive: Objects, Print, and the Materiality of Research”
3. Ryan WHYTE, OCAD University, “Facsimile King: The Crisis of Materiality in Representations of Louis XV”
4. Paula RADISCH, Whittier College, “Two Case Studies in High Art: Quentin de La Tour and Chardin”

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The Circuit of Apollo: Women’s Tributes to Women in the Long Eighteenth-Century, Part II (Roundtable) (Women’s Caucus Scholarly Panel)
Saturday, 21 March, 9:45–11:15, San Pedro
Chair: Laura L. RUNGE, University of South Florida
1. Julie Candler HAYES, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “Women on Women: Writing Women’s Literary History in France”
2. Julie MURRAY, Carleton University, “Remembering Mary Wollstonecraft: Mary Hays’ Late Style”
3. Deborah WEISS, University of Alabama, “The Tribute of Critique: Amelia Opie and Mary Wollstonecraft”
4. Jessica FRIPP, Parsons The New School for Design, “Honoring Geoffrin: Joséphine and Lemonnier’s The First Reading of Voltaire’s Tragedy L’Orphelin de la Chine in the Salon of Madame Geoffrin in 1755”
5. Jocelyn HARRIS, University of Otago, “Jane Austen’s Homage to Fanny Burney in Mansfield Park
6. Katharine KITTREDGE, Ithaca College, “Friendship as Platform for Reinvention: Melesina Trench and Mary Leadbeater”

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Clifford Lecture
Saturday, 21 March, 11:30–12:30, Catalina Ballroom
Presiding: Felicity A. NUSSBAUM, University of California, Los Angeles
Ann BERMINGHAM University of California, Santa Barbara, “Coffee-House Characters and British Visual Humor at the End of the Eighteenth Century”

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American Latium: American Artists in and around Rome in the Age of the Grand Tour” (Italian Studies Caucus)
Saturday, 21 March, 2:00–3:30, San Gabriel A
Chair: Karin WOLFE, British School at Rome
1. Christopher M.S. JOHNS, Vanderbilt University, “John Singleton Copley in Rome: The Challenge of the Old Masters Accepted”
2. Tommaso MANFREDI, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, “The Rome of Charles Bulfinch: A Cultural Itinerary of 1786”
3. Vincent PHAM, University of California, San Diego, “Transatlantic Transactions: Benjamin West, the Grand Tour and The American School in London”

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Flipping the Grand Tour: The Italian Response
Saturday, 21 March, 3:45–5:15, Santa Anita C
Chairs: Blair DAVIS, University of California, Santa Barbara AND
Carole PAUL, University of California, Santa Barbara
1. Peter Björn KERBER, J. Paul Getty Museum, “Foreigners and Festivals in Settecento Venice”
2. Shirley SMITH, Skidmore College, “Goldoni and Baretti: Italian Vacations in the Eighteenth Century”
3. Clorinda DONATO, California State University, Long Beach, “Correcting the Grand Tour Gaze: Domenico Caminer Reviews De La Lande’s 1766 Voyage en Italie”

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Beyond Orientalism: Consumer Agency and Producer Adaptation in Asia Exchanges with Europe and the Americas
Saturday, 21 March, 3:45–5:15, Santa Barbara B
Chair: Samara CAHILL, Nanyang Technological University
1. Sofía SANABRAIS, University of Southern California, “‘…desired and sought by the rest of the world’: The Philippine–Asia Trade and its Impact on Spanish Colonial Artistic Production”
2. Rachel Tamar VAN, California Polytechnic State University, Pomona, “A Market for Fakes: Knock-Offs, Adulteration, & Faux Masterpieces between China & Early America”
3. Susan SPENCER, University of Central Oklahoma, “Ihara Saikaku: Literary Artistry Meets the Art of the Deal”
Respondent: Emily M.N. KUGLER, Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, Brown University

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The Royal Mistresses of Eighteenth-Century France
Saturday, 21 March, 3:45–5:15, Los Cerritos
Chair: Mary TROUILLE, Illinois State University
1. Kathleen WELLMAN, Southern Methodist University, “Keeping it in the Family: The Nesle Sisters in the Reign and Reputation of Louis XV”
2. Ashley MASON, University of Iowa, “The Marquise de Maintenon or La Scarron: Manipulative Dissimulator or Ideal maîtresse du roi?”
3. C. Ryan HILLIARD, University of California, Los Angeles, “The Female Networks of a Royal Mistress: The Correspondence of Madame de Maintenon and the Princesse des Ursins”
4. Amanda STRASIK, University of Iowa, “Madame de Pompadour, François Boucher, and the Pastoral Child”

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