Enfilade

New Book | Italian Watermarks, 1750–1860

Posted in books by Editor on July 15, 2016

From Brill:

Theo Laurentius and Frans Laurentius, Italian Watermarks, 1750–1860 (Leidin: Brill, 2016), 175 pages, ISBN: 978-9004310612, €175 / $210.

91365The knowledge of papermaking spread slowly over Italy from the start of the 13th century. Scholarly interest in the history of Italian paper manufacture has concentrated especially on the earliest period. Research into Italian paper from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries has lagged somewhat behind.

Watermarks are extremely important for investigating the origins of paper. Until quite recently watermarks were copied and reproduced by placing them on a light source and then tracing them over onto some kind of transparency. It should be clear, however, that in many instances this technique could never achieve reproductions that were one hundred per cent accurate. Italian Watermarks, 1750–1860 offers x-rays and descriptions of approximately three hundred Italian watermarks. A selection of paper produced in different areas of Italy is presented with an identification.

Theo Laurentius has been active as a paper researcher for over fifty years. He has published several studies on watermarks and paper, including two important catalogues: Watermarks 1600–1650 Found in the Zeeland Archives (Hes & De Graaf, 2007) and Watermarks 1650–1700 Found in the Zeeland Archives (Hes & De Graaf, 2008).
Frans Laurentius, Ph.D., is an art historian. He has published several studies on graphic arts, Dutch pottery, and watermarks, as well as a monograph on the Dutch print dealer Clement de Jonghe: Clement de Jonghe (ca. 1624–1677): Kunstverkoper in de Gouden Eeuw (Hes & De Graaf, 2010).

Exhibition | Italian Landscape of the Romantic Era

Posted in exhibitions by InternRW on July 15, 2016

Italian Landscape of the Romantic Era.jpg

Ferdinand Oehme, Villa d’Este in Tivoli, detail, 1833
(Dresden: Albertinum, Galerie Neue Meister)

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

From the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden:

Italian Landscape of the Romantic Era: Painting and Literature
Italienische Landschaft der Romantik: Malerei und Literatur
Neues Schloss, Bad Muskau, 11 May — 21 August 2016

The whole sky was covered with a whitish haze of cloud, through which the sun, without its form being distinguishable,  gleamed over the sea, which displayed the most beautiful sky blue hue that one ever could see.Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1787

Tivoli and the Roman Campagna, Capri and the Bay of Naples, majestic silhouettes of lofty mountains, glittering expanses of sea, dignified ancient architecture and Mediterranean flora: il bel paese (‘the beautiful country’) as seen by writers and artists, is at the focus of this special exhibition.

Neues Schloss in Bad Muskau (Photo by David Pinzer)

Neues Schloss in Bad Muskau (Photo by David Pinzer)

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries travelers to Italy increasingly focused on the perception of nature. Their encounters with southern climes promised a substantial impetus for artistic development and regeneration. Hence, the Italian landscape became a new ideal for landscape gardens which spread more or less simultaneously from England over the whole continent of Europe. One of the most important protagonists of this movement in Germany was Prince Hermann von Pückler-Muskau (1785–1871), whose park and castle in Bad Muskau are an ideal venue for the exhibition. His landscape park, which was begun in 1815, is now one of the most beautiful in Europe and has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2004. Indeed, the park itself was originally conceived as a kind of museum: “A park must be like an art gallery: every few steps you should see a new picture” (Pückler-Muskau).

The special exhibition in the New Castle (Neues Schloss) features more than 20 masterpieces—landscapes full of light by painters such as Jakob Philipp Hackert, Ludwig Richter, Ernst Ferdinand Oehme, Carl Rottmann, and Carl Blechen. All these paintings reflect the poetry of nature, the rich colours, and forms found in the south. Most of them are usually housed in the Dresden Albertinum and are among the highlights of the Galerie Neue Meister; thanks to the restoration of several paintings from the store room, their original radiance has been revitalized.

Selected writings by contemporary authors who also traveled around Italy—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Gottfried Seume, Madame de Staël, and Wilhelm Waiblinger—enable the Italian landscape to be experienced in a combination of genres. The most important starting point for such painted and written projections of this land of longing, Goethe’s Italian Journey was first published in installments in 1816, and so the year 2016 marks the 200th anniversary of its publication. It initiated a period of German fascination for the “land where the lemon trees bloom” (Goethe), a fascination which—with few exceptions and several interruptions—extended into broad social circles and whose effect is still felt today.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

New Book | Silver in Georgian Dublin

Posted in books by InternRW on July 15, 2016

From Routledge:

Alison FitzGerald, Silver in Georgian Dublin: Making, Selling, Consuming (New York: Routledge, 2016), 256 pages, ISBN: 978-1472427878, $150.

Silver in Georgian DublinGeorgian Dublin is synonymous with a period of unprecedented expansion in the market for luxury goods. At a time when new commodities, novel technologies, and fashionable imports seduced elite society, silver enjoyed an established association with gentility and prestige. Earlier studies have focused predominantly on the issue of style. This book considers the demand for silver goods in Georgian Ireland from the perspectives of makers, retailers, and consumers. It discusses the practical and symbolic uses of silverware, interpreted through contemporary guild accounts, inventories, trade ephemera, and culinary manuscripts. For the first time the activities of Dublin’s goldsmiths and their customers are considered in the context of the British Isles, acknowledging Dublin’s ‘second city’ status in relation to London. How did the availability of new products like English porcelain and Sheffield Plate affect the demand for silver in Dublin, and how did silver imports from London affect the Dublin trade? To what extent do the practices of Dublin goldsmiths mirror their North American counterparts seeking to infer associations with the fashionable metropolis of London? Drawing on an extensive range of documentary and object evidence this wide-ranging analysis considers the context in which silver goods were made, used, valued, and displayed in Georgian Ireland.

Alison FitzGerald is a Lecturer in the Department of History at Maynooth University, Ireland.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

C O N T E N T S

Introduction
1  The Business of Becoming a Goldsmith in Eighteenth-Century Dublin
2  Goldsmiths and Market Forces in Eighteenth-Century Ireland
3  Shopping for Plate in Dublin and London
4  Silver and Its Meaning in Georgian Ireland
5  The Silver Trade in Post-Union Ireland
Conclusion

Save

Save

Save