Enfilade

New Book | The Villa Laurentina of Pliny the Younger

Posted in books by InternRW on July 22, 2016

From L’Erma di Bretschneider:

Jerzy Miziolek, The Villa Laurentina of Pliny the Younger in an 18th-Century Vision (Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider, 2016), 250 pages, ISBN: 978-8891308443, €75 / $94.

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The book deals with a paper reconstruction of Pliny the Younger’s (c. AD 61–112) villa near Ostia, some twenty kilometres from Rome. This unique work was created in Rome in the years 1777–78 by a young Pole, Count Stanisław K. Potocki (1755–1821) in cooperation with Giuseppe Manocchi and other outstanding artists of the time. The work, originally in the Potocki collection in Wilanów, is today housed in the iconographic collection of the National Library, Warsaw. It contains over thirty large-format, color drawings. In the late 18th century, probably during his last sojourn in Italy (1795–97), Count Potocki wrote a 24-page-long commentary to his work, entitled Notes et Idées sur la Villa de Pline. This hitherto unpublished manuscript commentary and reconstruction drawings of the villa are now published together with a virtual visualisation of the villa produced in 3D Studio Max 2014.

Jerzy Miziolek is professor of the visual arts and the classical tradition at the University of Warsaw (Institute of Archaeology). He is the author of seven books and more than 150 papers and reviews. He has delivered more than forty papers and lectures at foreign universities and international symposia concerning Early Christian, Renaissance, and neoclassical art.

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C O N T E N T S

Introduction

I. Stanislaw Kostka Potocki: Archaeology and Artistic Culture in the 2nd Half of the Eighteenth Century
1  The Fascination with Antiquity and Its Influence in the 2nd Half of the Eighteenth Century
2  Stanisław Kostka Potocki in the Memoirs of Eyewitness
3  Stanisław Kostka Potocki’s Studies at the Royal Academy in Turin
4  Stanisław Kostka Potocki’s Travels around Italy in 1774–82
5  In the Company of Princess Izabela Lubomirska: Stanisław Kostka Potocki’s Sojourn in Italy in 1785–86

II. The Laurentina: Pliny the Younger’s Seaside Villa and Its Reconstruction in the Pure Taste of the Century of Trajan
1  A Literary Portrait of the Laurentina: The Dwelling-Place of the Muses
2  The Owner of the Laurentina
3  The Search for the Remnants of the Laurentina in the Eighteenth Century and Later
4  Pliny ‘s Letter on the Laurentina in European Culture from the Renaissance to Neoclassicism
5  Artists Employed by Stanisław Kostka Potocki and Their Drawings
6  Reconstruction Drawings of the Laurentina and Remarks on the Notes et Idées sur la Villa de Pline
7  Reconstruction of Pliny ‘s Villa, Decoration of the Main Rooms, Patterns, and Inspirations
8  The Cryptoportico with Adjacent Pavilions and the Heliocaminus
9  Some notes on the Ideas Guiding the Plan for Pliny ‘s Villa by Potocki

III. The Third Dimension of Pliny the Younger ‘s villa: Virtual Reconstruction of the Laurentina
Instead of an Epilogue: The Laurentina of Potocki ‘s Vision and the Artistic Cultures of Neoclassical Warsaw

Appendices
Pliny the Younger, Letter to Gallus (2, 17)
Stanisław Kostka Potocki, Notes and Ideas on Pliny ‘s Villa
Notes and Explanations in the Portfolios Containing the Drawings

Bibliography

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Exhibition | Of Beauty and Grandeur: Roman Portraits in the Baroque

Posted in exhibitions by Editor on July 22, 2016

From the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden:

Of Beauty and Grandeur: Roman Portraits and their Baroque Appropriation
Von Schönheit und Größe: Römische Porträts und ihre barocke Aneignung
Skulpturensammlung at the Albertinum, Dresden, 22 July — 6 November 2016

Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 11.50.12 AMThe Dresden Antiquities Collection is one of the oldest collections amassed in Dresden by the kings and prince electors, and one of the oldest large collections of antiquities presented in a museum outside Italy. The items, on view behind glass in storage depots at the Albertinum, are currently waiting to be presented again in the eastern gallery of the Semperbau at the Zwinger. The sculptures from classical antiquity and the Baroque period have not been presented to the public in a fitting manner since 2002, the year of a major flood on the Elbe, followed by the reconstruction of the Albertinum and its reopening as a museum for modern art.

The collection displays a selection of some 50 classical and Baroque portraits and portrait statues. These portraits—sculptures combining authenticity and idealisation—played a crucial role in defining and communicating political, social and communal identities, sending out various messages to their audience in ancient times. One of the most important art genres of classical antiquity, portraits of children, women, politicians, military commanders and the ruling elite were a ubiquitous element of everyday Roman life. They were erected on public squares, influencing broad swathes of the public as a kind of mass media. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the works, which had often survived only as fragments, were elaborately and splendidly completed with busts made of coloured stone or reworked in the classical style.  At the start of the 18th century, they came to Dresden from the Brandenburg Collection built up by Friedrich Wilhelm I (1688–1740) and the Roman Collection assembled by the House of Chigi.

This presentation shines the spotlight on the sculptures which make up the heart of the collection and which stand out in terms of their quality and quantity. Among the items there are some unusual works, such as the statue of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius (150–160 AD), the portrait of his wife Faustina (around 140 AD) on a magnificent Baroque bust of coloured marble, or the porphyry bust of the emperor known as Caligula (17th century), whose acquisition was of particular value to Augustus the Strong because of its precious material. Loans from the Grünes Gewölbe (Green Vault) include a showpiece by Johann Melchior Dinglinger and Balthasar Permoser: a cameo of a Roman emperor from classical antiquity set in a precious frame. In the 18th century this portrait was seen as that of the first Roman emperor, Augustus. Augustus the Strong saw himself as linked to his namesake by his own fame as a ruler and a patron of the arts.

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New Book | Klassizismus in Aktion: Goethes ‘Propyläen’

Posted in books by Editor on July 22, 2016

Published by Böhlau with details from  De Gruyter:

Daniel Ehrmann and Norbert Christian Wolf, eds., Klassizismus in Aktion: Goethes ‘Propyläen’ und das Kunstprogramm der Weimarer Klassik (Vienna: Böhlau Verlag, 2015), 458 pages, ISBN: 978-3205201540, 59€ / $83 / £45.

51aTvpVG5fLDer Band setzt sich mit der von Johann Wolfgang Goethe von 1798 bis 1800 herausgegebenen Kunstzeitschrift Propyläen auseinander und nimmt dabei nicht nur bekannte Essays des Herausgebers, sondern auch Beiträge Friedrich Schillers, Johann Heinrich Meyers und Wilhelm von Humboldts in den Blick. Erstmalig wird so eine zentrale Programmschrift des deutschen Klassizismus in ihrem inneren Zusammenhang gemustert und in ihren zeitgenössischen Kontexten interdisziplinär untersucht. Dadurch kann die literaturhistorische und ästhetikgeschichtliche Bedeutung des publizistischen Projekts neu ermessen werden. Der Forschung soll so ein vertiefender Einblick in das innere Gefüge und die spannungsreiche Beschaffenheit des klassizistischen Weimarer Kunstprogramms eröffnet werden.

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I N H A L T S V E R Z E I C H N I S

EINLEITUNG
• Daniel Ehrmann / Norbert Christian Wolf, Klassizismus in Aktion. Zum spannungsreichen Kunstprogramm der Propyläen

KULTUR UND AUTONOMIE
• Sabine Schneider, »Ein Unendliches in Bewegung«. Positionierungen der Kunst inderKultur
• Hans-Jürgen Schings, Laokoon und La Mort de Marat oder Weimarische Kunstfreunde und Französische Revolution
• Daniel Ehrmann, Bildverlust oder Die Fallstricke der Operativität. Autonomie und Kulturalität der Kunst in den Propyläen

NATUR UND DIE KÜNSTE
• Elisabeth Décultot, Kunsttheorie als Übersetzung. Goethes Auseinandersetzung mit Diderots Versuch über die Mahlerey
• Dieter Borchmeyer, Weimarer Opernästhetik. Goethes Essay Ueber Wahrheit und Wahrscheinlichkeit der Kunstwerke
• Ernst Osterkamp, Das Drama und die Kunst des Klassizismus in den Propyläen

NORMATIVITÄT UND VIELSTIMMIGKEIT
• Johannes Grave Natur und Kunst, Illusion und Bildbewusstsein. Zu einigen Bildern in Goethes Beiträgen für die Propyläen
• Norbert Christian Wolf, Vielstimmigkeit im Kontext. Goethes ›kleiner KunstRoman‹
Der Sammler und die Seinigen in entstehungsgeschichtlicher und gattungstheoretischer Perspektive
• Martin Dönike, »Antike Kunstwerke«. Johann Heinrich Meyers altertumskundliche Beiträge zu den Propyläen

KLASSIZISTISCHE UND ANTIKLASSIZISTISCHE KUNSTPRAXIS
• Frank Büttner, Die Weimarischen Kunstfreunde und die Krise der Kunstakademien um 1800
• Johannes Rössler, Über das Helldunkel. Re exionen zu Druckgraphik und Reproduktionsmedien in den Propyläen
• York-Gothart Mix, ›Das Unendliche und das Endliche‹. Die Propyläen und die kunstphilosophische Debatte über die Arabeske als romantisches Erkenntnisbild

VOR UND NACH DEN »PROPYLÄEN«
• Gerrit Brüning, Glückliches Ereignis im Zeichen der Kunst. Die Propyläen als Frucht der Zusammenarbeit Goethes und Schillers
• Claudia Keller, Die ungeschriebenen Propyläen – Klassizismus im Experiment
• Peter Sprengel, Goethe-Nachfolge als Architekturphantasie. Zum Motiv der Propyläen im Werk Gerhart Hauptmanns

Abbildungen
Siglenverzeichnis
Verzeichnis der Beiträgerinnen und Beiträger
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