Enfilade

Urban History, February 2018

Posted in journal articles by Editor on January 29, 2018

The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Urban History:

Urban History 45 (February 2018)

A R T I C L E S

Matthew Jenkins, “The View from the Street: The Landscape of Polite Shopping in Georgian York,” pp. 26–48.

Shopping during the eighteenth century is increasingly viewed by scholars as an important leisure activity and an integral part of wider schemes of urban improvement. However, the physical evidence in the form of standing buildings is rarely considered. This article will demonstrate how a detailed examination and reconstruction of the urban landscape of York can illuminate how these practices were performed. The use of building biographies also allows owners to be identified and linked with specific shop types and surviving fabric. This enables exploration of how the physical environment influenced perceptions of the streetscape and the experience of interior retail space.

David Gilks, “The Fountain of the Innocents and Its Place in the Paris Cityscape, 1549–1788,” pp. 49–73.

This article analyses how the Fountain of the Innocents appeared and also how it was used and perceived as part of the Paris cityscape. In the 1780s, the plan to transform the Holy Innocents’ Cemetery into a market cast doubt on the Fountain’s future; earlier perceptions now shaped discussions over reusing it as part of the transformed quarter. The article documents how the Fountain was dismantled in 1787 and re-created the following year according to a new design, explaining why it was created in this form. Finally, the article considers what contemporary reactions to the remade Fountain reveal about attitudes toward the authenticity of urban monuments before the establishment of heritage institutions and societies.

Boris Stepanov and Natalia Samutina, “An Eighteenth-Century Theme Park: Museum-Reserve Tsaritsyno (Moscow) and the Public Culture of the Post-Soviet Metropolis,” pp. 74–99.

The article discusses the dramatic history of the Tsaritsyno Park and museum-reserve. By the mid-2000s, it had become one of Moscow’s iconic places and a zone where urban public culture was shaped. The authors trace the history of this architectural ensemble and park in terms of their role in сity culture and analyse changes in the historical culture of contemporary post-Soviet Moscow. The Tsaritsyno Park and museum exemplify these changes. An unfinished country residence of Catherine II, with a Grand Palace that had stood as a ruin for over 200 years, it has been radically renewed by the Moscow city authorities in what came to be labelled ‘fantasy restoration’. The palace was finished and now serves as the core of the museum, organized according to a controversial historical policy. Tsaritsyno as a whole became a cultural oddity featuring historical attractions for the public, effectively an ‘eighteenth-century theme park’.

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