Enfilade

Lecture | Menno Fitski, On a Japanese Lacquer Chest

Posted in lectures (to attend) by Editor on September 17, 2019

Next Thursday at Columbia:

Menno Fitski, Genji Meets Yoritomo
Burke Center, Columbia University, New York, 26 September 2019

Menno Fitski, head of Asian Art at the Rijksmuseum, will lecture on an astonishing mid-seventeenth century Japanese lacquer chest acquired by the museum in 2013. Hitherto known only through a poor World War II-era photograph published by his mentor (and father-in-law), the late Oliver Impey, the RM chest must be counted as one of the finest examples of Japanese lacquer ever to have been exported to the West. It forms part of what Impey described as the Fine Group—comprised of three other, similarly large, richly lacquered chests, in the the Victoria and Albert Museum; the State Historical Museum, Moscow; and one believed to have been sawn up. The recovery of the RM chest was rightfully heralded in the 2015 exhibition Asia in Amsterdam.

The RM and V&A chests are believed to have passed from the directors of the Dutch East India company in Japan who first acquired them to Cardinal Mazarin whose descendants preserved them throughout the eighteenth century. Around 1800, they were acquired by the renowned English collector William Beckford and subsequently sold in the estate sale of his son-in-law, the 10th Duke of Hamilton in 1882. At this point, their paths diverged—one to the V&A and the RM example into the collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence. At some point thereafter, the RM chest dropped off the map, only to remerge in a house near Paris six years ago.

But the odyssey through trade and European princely ownership is only part of their story as the quality and themes of these lacquers are in every sense exceptional (if only for what we now view as having been made expressly for export, i.e, Namban wares). Of a quality more generally identified with the most refined domestic taste (akin to those collected by Maria Theresa and Marie Antoinette), the panels of the chest illustrate scenes from the eleventh century Tale of Genji.

The lecture is scheduled for Thursday, 26 September 2019 at 6:00pm.

Call for Papers | Seventh Feminist Art History Conference

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on September 17, 2019

From Amart-l (9 September 2019) . . .

The Seventh Feminist Art History Conference
American University, Washington, D.C., 25–27 September 2020

Proposals due by 1 December 2019

The Feminist Art History Conference was established in 2010 to celebrate and build on the legacy of feminist art-historical scholarship and pedagogy originated by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard at American University in Washington, D.C. In September 2020 this international conference will convene for the seventh time. The core principles of a feminist art history have long included the goals of reclaiming the place of women artists and patrons within the history of art and visual culture, and of describing and elaborating how gendered ideologies have framed the structure of both artistic practice and the writing of art history over the centuries. In recent years feminist art history has also become increasingly intersectional and interdisciplinary, dialoguing with race, class, geography, and environmental and architectural issues, to name but a few.

In the spirit of bringing together the diverse strands of thought and practice that feminist art history now embraces, this conference will feature papers spanning a wide range of chronological, geographic, intersectional, and interdisciplinary topics. These may include (but are not limited to) artists, movements, and works of art and architecture; cultural institutions and critical discourses; practices of collecting, patronage, and display; the gendering of objects, spaces, and media; the reception of images; and issues of power, agency, gender, and sexuality within visual and material cultures. At this year’s conference, underrepresented art-historical periods (ancient, medieval, Renaissance), cultures and traditions beyond the Western world, and issues of race and ethnicity are especially encouraged. We welcome submissions from established and emerging scholars of art history as well as advanced graduate students.

To be considered for participation, please provide a single document in Microsoft Word. It should consist of a one-page, single-spaced proposal of unpublished work up to 500 words for a 20-minute presentation, followed by a curriculum vitae of no more than two pages. Please name the document “[last name]-proposal” and submit with the subject line “[last name]-proposal” to feminist.ahconference@gmail.com.

Invitations to participate will be sent by 1 February 2020.

Keynote Speaker
Kellie Jones, Professor in Art History and Archaeology and the Institute for Research in Aftrian American Studies (IRAAS), Columbia University

Organizing Committee
Joanne Allen, Jordan Amirkhani, Juliet Bellow, Norma Broude, Kim Butler Wingfield, Nika Elder, Mary D. Garrard, Andrea Pearson, Ying-chen Peng and Anne Nellis Richter (coordinator)
Sponsored by the Art History Program in the Department of Art, College of Arts and Sciences, American University, with the generous support of Robin D’Alessandro and Dr. Jane Fortune