Enfilade

Lecture | Wendy Wassyng Roworth on Angelica Kauffman

Posted in lectures (to attend) by Editor on March 6, 2020

At SLAM (and conveniently enough, coinciding with ASECS) . . .

Wendy Wassyng Roworth, Angelica Kauffman: An Enterprising Artist in 18th-Century Britain
Saint Louis Art Museum, 20 March 2020

Angelica Kauffman, Woman in Turkish Dress, 1767, oil on canvas, 25 × 20 inches (Saint Louis Art Museum, Funds given by Dr. E. Robert and Carol Sue Schultz 704.2018).

Angelica Kauffman (1741–1807), an Austrian-Swiss artist, began her career in Italy, where her clients included British tourists who encouraged the young painter to pursue her profession in England. Over the fifteen years she worked in London, Kauffman achieved fame and fortune and returned to Italy as an international celebrity. Celebrating a portrait recently acquired by the Museum, this lecture will discuss Kauffman’s life and work in England as a fashionable painter and member of the Royal Academy of Arts, a rare distinction for a woman, and how she used her talents to advantage.

Friday, 20 March 2020, 7pm, Farrell Auditorium at the Saint Louis Art Museum. The lecture is offered free of charge, thanks to the Mary Strauss Women in the Arts Endowment. Tickets are, however, required. Advance tickets are recommended and may be reserved in person at the Museum’s Information Centers or through MetroTix, 314.534.1111 (all tickets reserved through MetroTix incur a service charge).

Wendy Wassyng Roworth is Professor Emerita of Art History, University of Rhode Island.

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, March 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on March 6, 2020

In the latest issue of the Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies:

Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 43.1 (March 2020).

A R T I C L E S

• Amanda Vickery, “Branding Angelica: Reputation Management in Late Eighteenth‐Century England,” 3–24.
• Alberto del Campo Tejedor, “The Barber of Enlightened Spain: On the Politics and Practice of Grooming a Modern Nation,” pp. 25–42.
• Ana Sáez‐Hidalgo, “Anglo‐Spanish Enlightenment: Joseph Shepherd, an English ‘ilustrado’ in Valladolid,” pp. 46–60.
• Robert W. Jones, “Elizabeth Sheridan’s Post‐Celebrity,” pp. 61–78.
• Jonathan Taylor, “‘Who Bravely Fights, and Like Achilles Bleeds’: The Ideal of the Front‐Line Soldier during the Long Eighteenth Century,” pp. 79–100.

E D I T E D  M A N U S C R I P T S

• Jessica Wen Hui Lim, “Barbauld’s Lessons: The Conversational Primer in Late Eighteenth‐Century British Children’s Literature,” 101–20.

R E V I E W S

• Madeleine Pelling, Review of Susanna Avery‐Quash and Kate Retford, eds., The Georgian London Town House: Building, Collecting and Display, pp. 121–22.
• Megan Kitching, Review of Keith Michael Baker and Jenna Gibbs, eds., Life Forms in the Thinking of the Long Eighteenth Century, pp. 122–24.
• Charlotte Fletcher, Review of Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux, The Pocket: A Hidden History of Women’s Lives, 1660–1900, pp. 124–25.
• Hannah Hutchings‐Georgiou, Review of Andrew Carpenter, ed., The Poems of Olivia Elder, pp. 125–26.
• Thomas Lalevée, Review of Gabriel Galice and Christophe Miqueu, eds., Rousseau, la république, la paix: actes du colloque du GIPRI (Grand‐Saconnex, 2012), pp. 126–28.
• Helen Metcalfe, Review of Sally Holloway, The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture, pp. 128–29.
• Olive Baldwin Thelma Wilson, Review of Berta Joncus, Kitty Clive, or The Fair Songster, pp. 129–31.
• Joachim Whaley, Review of Claudia Keller, Lebendiger Abglanz: Goethes Italien‐Projekt als Kulturanalyse, pp. 131–32.
• Ben Wilkinson‐Turnbull, Review of A. C. Elias, John Irwin Fischer, and Panthea Reid, eds., Jonathan Swift’s Word‐Book: A Vocabulary Compiled for Esther Johnson and Copied in Her Own Hand, pp. 132–33.
• Max Skjönsberg, Review of Margaret Watkins, The Philosophical Progress of Hume’s Essays, pp. 133–35.