Enfilade

Amidst Pandemic

Posted in site information by Editor on March 23, 2020

Note from the Editor

I’ve always wanted Enfilade to be an informative site for people who want to better understand the eighteenth century. Even more than that, I’ve hoped that it would also be a space that would cultivate intellectual pleasure. Amid the many pressures we all face—as academics, museum professionals, gallerists, dealers, independent scholars, writers, &c., &c.—news of exhibitions and new books, calls for papers and other opportunities were, I trusted, a welcome antidote to an inbox overflowing with countless, mind-numbing chores. With its very predictable, entirely out-dated format (it is still very much the web as things looked in 2009), the site has aimed to provide a small, incremental conception of where the field now finds itself—where you all have, as a community of scholars, taken it.

And now, of course, with the global spread of the Coronavirus, we all find ourselves displaced from our regular ways of working, living, and being. Upcoming events listed here weeks ago will not happen (I’m still stunned to have missed out on what promised to be a brilliant ASECS in St. Louis), it’s hard to know quite what to make of calls for papers (at least in the short-term), and all of those current exhibitions so carefully installed sit entirely quiet, waiting for when museums will again open their doors. I realize, in other words, that much of the regular content of Enfilade now takes on a strange hue.

With advanced apologies for anything that sounds tone-deaf or insensitive in the midst of a pandemic, I plan to keep at it, largely in hopes that the site might continue to offer useful information, as well as providing something that feels familiar when so much doesn’t. And I suspect news of forthcoming books will be more welcome than ever (please don’t be bashful in sending in news items). If you’ve not yet started following HECAA’s Instagram account, have a look: Katherine Iselin—who just recently defended her dissertation at Missouri under the direction of Michael Yonan—does a brilliant job with it. And in the coming weeks, HECAA will launch a new website exclusively for members. There is, then, a thriving community of dixhuitièmistes, even in these days of isolation.

Particularly in the weeks and months ahead, take care of yourselves and be well.

Craig Hanson

ASECS 2020, St. Louis

Posted in conferences (to attend) by Editor on March 23, 2020

Although this year’s ASECS conference was cancelled, I want to acknowledge the many interesting panels and talks that were planned for this past weekend. I was looking forward to it. And what a stunning cover for the program! CH

2020 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
Hyatt Regency at the Arch, St. Louis, 19–21 March 2020

The 51st annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies was scheduled to take place at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch in St. Louis, before it was cancelled in response to the Coronavirus pandemic. HECAA was to be represented by the Anne Schroder New Scholars’ Session, chaired by Susanna Caviglia and scheduled for Friday morning. The annual business meeting was to take place Friday evening at 5:00. A selection of 29 additional panels is included here (of the 188 sessions scheduled, many others would, of course, have interested HECAA members). For the full slate of offerings, see the program.

W E D N E S D A Y ,  1 8  M A R C H  2 0 2 0

Introduction to the St. Louis Art Museum Eighteenth-Century Collections
Wednesday, 1:00–5:00
Organizers: Amy TORBERT, Saint Louis Art Museum and Brittany LUBERDA, Baltimore Museum of Art
The pre-conference workshop will consist of dialogues among curators, field experts, and attendees on topics including global encounter, intermateriality, politics of empire, social histories, production processes, and curating the eighteenth century. These conversations will be held in the galleries in front of highlights such as colonial silver, European porcelain, Chinese bronzes and exportware, Peruvian textiles, and paintings including John Greenwood’s Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam (c.1752–58) and François-André Vincent’s Arria and Paetus (1784). The event will include the opportunity to study works from storage rarely on view and to visit the Print Study Room.
Participants must have pre-registered and must arrange their own transportation. The Museum is a 30-minute drive from the airport and a 20-minute drive from the hotel.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

T H U R S D A Y ,  1 9  M A R C H  2 0 2 0

Burneys and Stuff: Material Culture and the Visual Arts (The Burney Society)
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am
Chair: Alicia KERFOOT, SUNY Brockport
1. Teri DOERKSEN, Mansfield University of Pennsylvania, ‘Soles to be saved; Soles not to be saved’: Humanizing the Material and Objectifying the Human in Edward Francis Burney’s Satirical Regency Watercolors
2. Cynthia KLEKAR-CUNNINGHAM, Western Michigan University, Objects and Absence: The Immaterial in Burney’s Fiction
3. Kristin M. DISTEL, Ohio University, ‘Tis some exquisite performer’: Juliet’s Harp and the Shame of Visibility in Burney’s The Wanderer

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The Particularity of Experience and the Art of Judgment
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am
Chair: Neil SACCAMANO, Cornell University
1. Vivasvan SONI, Northwestern University, Experience with(out) Judgment: Senses of Experience in Locke’s Essay, Sterne’s Tristram Shandy and Blake’s Songs
2. Johannes WANKHAMMER, Princeton University, The Senses Do Judge: A. G. Baumgarten’s Theory of Judgment and the Claims of Aesthetics
3. Karen VALIHORA, York University, Adam Smith’s Sublime and Beautiful
4. Patrick COLEMAN, UCLA, ‘Est-il bon, est-il méchant?’: Judgment, Action, and Aesthetics in Diderot

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Amateur or Professional? Reconsidering the Language of Artistic Status
Thursday, 8:00–9:30am
Chairs: Paris SPIES-GANS, Harvard Society of Fellows and Laurel PETERSON, The Morgan Library & Museum
1. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, Fashioning Fairies: Lady Diana Beauclerk’s Watercolors
2. Luke FREEMAN, University of Minnesota, Engraving Authority: Bernard Picart’s Status and the ‘Leading Hands of Europe’
3. Maura GLEESON, University of Florida, Picturing La Créatrice: Image, Imagination, and Artistic Practice in Napoleonic France
4. Cynthia ROMAN, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, ‘Not Artists’: Horace Walpole’s Hyperbolic Praise of Prints by Persons of Rank and Quality

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: How to Publish in an Eighteenth-Century Studies Journal
Thursday, 9:45–11:15am
Chair: Adam SCHOENE, Eighteenth-Century Studies
1. J. T. SCANLAN, The Age of Johnson
2. Eugenia ZUROSKI, Eighteenth-Century Fiction
3. Cedric D. REVERAND, Eighteenth-Century Life
4. Sean MOORE, Eighteenth-Century Studies
5. Jennifer THORN, Eighteenth-Century Studies
6. David A. BREWER, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Mineralogy and Artful Metamorphosis
Thursday, 11:30–1:00
Chairs: Tara ZANARDI, Hunter College, CUNY and Christina LINDEMAN, University of South Alabama
1. Elisabeth C. RIVARD, Independent Scholar, The Handheld ‘Wunderkammer’: Mineralogical Snuffboxes in the Enlightenment
2. Jennifer GERMANN, Ithaca College, Peaches and Pearls: Materializing Metaphors of Race in Eighteenth-Century British Art
3. Eleanore NEUMANN, University of Virginia, Drifted Rocks: Gender and Geologic Time in the Early-Nineteenth-Century Landscapes of John Linnell, J.M.W. Turner, and Maria Graham

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Rethinking Turquerie: New Definitions and Approaches
Thursday, 11:30–1:00
Chair: Ashley BRUCKBAUER, Independent Scholar
1. Jonathan HADDAD, University of Georgia, Cooking the Books: The Marquis de Caumont’s Turkish Cauldrons and the Ottoman Incunabula
2. Katherine ARPEN, Auburn University, The ‘Hammam’ as a Model for Public Bathing in Late Eighteenth-Century France

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

From ‘Tabula Rasa’ to ‘Terra Incognita’: Landscape and Identity in the Enlightenment
Thursday, 11:30–1:00
Chair: Shirley TUNG, Kansas State University
1. Michael BROWN, University of Aberdeen, Locating Britain: The English Geographies of Daniel Defoe
2. John DAVENPORT, Missouri Southern State University, Topographical Dialogues and Competing Claims to Selfhood in Eighteenth-Century Travel Writing
3. Kasie ALT, Georgia Southern University, Negotiating the Self through Landscape Design and Representation: Thomas Anson’s Estate at Shugborough
4. Julia SIENKEWICZ, Roanoke College, Landscape and Alterity: Encounters with Virginia and South Africa

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: Surveying Social Media and Eighteenth-Century Studies
Thursday, 11:30–1:00
Chair: Crystal LAKE, Wright State University
1. Jenny DAVIDSON, Columbia University
2. Aaron HANLON, Colby College
3. Marguerite HAPPE, UCLA
4. Sarah Tindal KAREEM, UCLA and The Rambling

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

‘Too political, too big, no good’: Picturing Politics
Thursday, 2:30–4:00
Chair: Jessica L. FRIPP, Texas Christian University
1. Alexandra CARDON, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Engaging the Public: The Rejection of Mythology in Royal Almanac Prints 1695–1715
2. J. Patrick MULLINS, Marquette University, Thomas Hollis’s ‘Liberty Prints’ and the Transatlantic Cult of Tyrannicide
3. Thomas BUSCIGLIO-RITTER, University of Delaware, Denis Volozan’s Portrait of George Washington in an Atlantic Context
4. Marina KLIGER, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, From ‘Great Men’ to ‘Women’s Influence’: Retelling the Story of Louis Ducis’s Tasso and Eleonora d’Este from the Empire to the Restoration

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: Engaging the Ottoman Empire
Chair: Ashley COHEN, University of South California
Thursday, Thursday, 4:15–5:45
1. Douglas FORDHAM, University of Virginia
2. Lynn FESTA, Rutgers University
3. Katherine CALVIN, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
4. Angelina DEL BALZO, Bilkent University
5. Humberto GARCIA, University of California, Merced
6. Charlotte SUSSMAN, Duke University
7. Gerald MACLEAN, University of Exeter
Respondent: Daniel O’QUINN, University of Guelph

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Colonial Matter in the Eighteenth-Century World
Thursday, Thursday, 4:15–5:45
Chairs: Danielle EZOR, Southern Methodist University and Kaitlin GRIMES, University of Missouri-Columbia
1. Amelia RAUSER, Franklin & Marshall College, Madras Cloth: Currency, Costume, and Enslavement
2. Kelly FLEMING, University of Virginia, Empire, Satire, and the Regency Cap in The Adventures of an Ostrich Feather of Quality (1812)
3. Yiyun HUANG, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, ‘Nothing but large potions of tea could extinguish it’: Chinese Knowledge and Discourse of Tea in Colonial America

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The Enlightened Mind: Education in the Long Eighteenth Century
Thursday, Thursday, 4:15–5:45
Chairs: Karissa BUSHMAN, Quinnipiac University and Amanda STRASIK, Eastern Kentucky University
1. Franny BROCK, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Madame de Genlis’ ‘New Method’ and Teaching Drawing to Children in Eighteenth-Century France
2. Dorothy JOHNSON, University of Iowa, Bodies of Knowledge? Teaching Anatomy to Artists in Enlightenment France
3. Madeline SUTHERLAND-MEIER, University of Texas, Austin, Raising and Educating Children in Eighteenth-Century Spain: Padre Sarmiento’s Discurso sobre el método que debia guardarse en la primera educación de la juventud
4. Brigitte WELTMAN-ARON, University of Florida, The Pitfalls of Education: Madame de Genlis on Spoiled Children

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The Visual Gothic in the Long Eighteenth Century
Thursday, Thursday, 4:15–5:45
Chair: Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College
1. Aurélien DAVRIUS, Paris-Malaquais ENSA, Jacques-François Blondel, an Admirer of French Religious Architecture
2. Katherine HILLIARD, Princeton University, Behind the Veil: Gothic Secrecy and Epistemology in The Mysteries of Udolpho
3. Elizabeth HORNBECK, University of Missouri, Vetusta Monumenta and the Eighteenth-Century Remediation of Gothic Architecture

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

F R I D A Y ,  2 0  M A R C H  2 0 2 0

Anne Schroder New Scholars Session (HECAA)
Friday, 8:00–9:30am
Chair: Susanna CAVIGLIA, Duke University
1. Isabel BALDRICH, School of Art and Art History, University of Iowa, Black Skin, White Hands: Ambivalence in Girodet’s Portrait of Belley
2. Alicia CATICHA, University of Virginia, Sculpting Whiteness: Marble, Porcelain, and Sugar in Eighteenth-Century Paris
3. Philippe HALBERT, Yale University, Surface Encounters, Mirror Images, and Creole Body Politics in French Louisiana
4. Xena FITZGERALD, Southern Methodist University, Between Frame and Stage: Viewing a Historical Marriage in Eighteenth-Century Peru

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The Rise of the House Museum: Domestic Curatorial Practices
Friday, 9:45–11:15am
Chair: Teri FICKLING, University of Texas, Austin
1. Jane CELESTE, Rice University, Farnley Hall and Fairfaxiana: Collecting History, Displaying Politics
2. Kirsten HALL, University of Texas, Austin, Specters and Spectators: Charlotte Addison and the Making of an Archive at Bilton Hall
3. Fiona BRIDEOAKE, American University, Curation and Creation at A la Ronde
4. Lisa BRUNE, Washington University in St. Louis, ‘So artfully planted’: Women’s Utopian Curation in Sarah Scott’s Millenium Hall

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Visualizing Empire in the French Eighteenth Century
Friday, 9:45–11:15am
Chair: Philippe HALBERT, Yale University
1. Izabel GASS, Yale University, The Classical Body as ‘Dispositif’ in the French New World
2. Harry ADAMS, Tsinghua University, Kader Attia’s Cosmopolitan Enlightenment
3. Thomas BEACHDEL, Hostos Community College, The Sublime Future in Ruins

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: The Global Eighteenth Century (Western Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies)
Friday, 9:45–11:15am
Chair: Sören HAMMERSCHMIDT, GateWay Community College
1. Samara CAHILL, Blinn College, The Propagation of Infidels
2. Norbert SCHÜRER, California State University, Long Beach, Found in Translation
3. James MULHOLLAND, North Carolina State University, Middle Reading
4. David MAZELLA, University of Houston, Wilkes, Whitefield, Woolman: The Global Attention Economy of the Eighteenth Century
5. Emily CASEY, Saint Mary’s College of Maryland, Decolonizing Colonial American Art Histories
6. Rebekah MITSEIN, Boston College, The Matter of Akan Metaphysics in Eighteenth-Century Thought
Respondent: Stephanie DEGOOYER, Willamette University

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Do-Overs: Repetition and Revision in the Long Eighteenth Century
Friday, 11:30–12:45
Chair: Elizabeth MANSFIELD, Pennsylvania State University
1. Servanne WOODWARD, University of Western Ontario, Transitions from Rococo to Neo-Classical Illustration with Moreau le jeune
2. Amy FREUND, Southern Methodist University, Jean-Baptiste Oudry and Canine Repetition
3. Daniella BERMAN, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, ‘d’après David’: Variations on Portraiture
4. Wendy BELLION, University of Delaware, The Eighteenth Brumaire of King George III

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Presidential Session: Innovating the Next Fifty Years of ASECS
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chair: Jeffrey RAVEL, MIT
1. Lisa FREEMAN, University of Illinois at Chicago, Trends in the Academic Job Market: What Can ASECS Do?
2. Emily FRIEDMAN, Auburn University, Digital Humanities and the Future of ASECS
3. Melissa J. GANZ, Marquette University and Peter ERICKSON, Colorado State University, Innovating ASECS: New Conference Formats
4. April FULLER, University of Maryland and Dylan LEWIS, University of Maryland, Humanities Beyond the Academy

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Workshop: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chairs: Erica HAYES, Villanova University and Kacie WILLS, Illinois College
This workshop will provide participants with the technical skills to align geographic coordinates to a digitized historical map in the eighteenth-century in order to create a georeferenced historical map. Participants will learn how to use simple tools like Map Warper, an open source image georeferencer tool, in order to overlay the digitized historical map on top of a GIS modern basemap for compar- ison and use in an interactive web mapping application. This workshop is ideal for scholars working with historical maps or interested in learning digital humanities GIS skills. Workshop participants need to bring their own laptops. No prior GIS or mapping experience is required. Contact the ASECS Business Office if you are interested in signing up for this workshop. Walk-ins are welcome if space permits but are encouraged to arrive early if they wish to participate in the hands-on activities of the workshop. Interested observers are also welcome if space permits.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: Scholarly Tourism: Traveling to Research the Eighteenth Century
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chair: Ula Lukszo KLEIN, Kennesaw State University
1. Claudia SCHUMANN, Texas Tech University, In the Shadows — Researching Underrepresented Women Writers
2. Meg KOBZA, Newcastle University, Places of Privilege: Price and Practice in Private Archives
3. Caroline GONDA, University of Cambridge, Strawberry Hill and Shibden Hall: Anne Damer and Anne Lister
4. Fiona RITCHIE, McGill University, Mentoring Student Researchers in the Archives
5. Laura ENGEL, Duquesne University, The Archival Tourist
6. Leigh-Michil GEORGE, UCLA, ‘The Corruption of Mrs. Woodward’: A Story of Love and Betrayal, Lost and Found in the Kent Archives
7. Yvonne FUENTES, University of West Georgia, Eighteenth-Century Gossip and News: The Archives of Spanish Parish Churches, Cathedrals, and Basilicas

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: Teaching Eighteenth-Century Health Humanities
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chair: Rebecca MESSBARGER, University of Washington in St. Louis
1. Kate GUSTAFSON, Indiana University Northwest, Teaching Empathy Practices through Eighteenth-Century Text
2. Brittany PLADEK, Marquette University, Teaching Eighteenth-Century Medical Ethics in the Literature Classroom
3. Abigail ZITIN, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, Topics in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture: Fiction/Addiction
4. Andrew GRACIANO, University of South Carolina, Art, Anatomy, and Medicine, 1700–Present
5. C. C. WHARRAM, Eastern Illinois University, Introduction to the Health & Medical Humanities: Contagion

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Built Form
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chair: Janet R. WHITE, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
1. Luis J. GORDO PELAEZ, California State University, Grain Architecture in Bourbon New Spain
2. Paul HOLMQUIST, Louisiana State University, Une autre nature: Aristotelian Strains in Ledoux’s Theory of Architecture as Legislation
3. Dylan Wayne SPIVEY, University of Virginia, Building from a Book: James Gibb’s Book of Architecture and the Commodification of Architectural Style
4. Miguel VALERIO, Washington University, Architecture of Devotions: The Churches Afro-Brazilian Religious Brotherhoods Built in the Eighteenth Century

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Experiencing the Past: Bringing Collections to Life through Experiment and Reconstruction
Friday, 4:30–6:00
Chair: Al COPPOLA, John Jay College, CUNY
1. Emily BECK, Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, Bentley GILLMAN and Jon KRIEDLER, Tattersall Distilling, Nicole LABOUFF, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Alcohol’s Empire: Distilled Spirits in the 1700s Atlantic World
2. Christine GRIFFITHS, Bard Graduate Center, Distilling Gardens and (Re)Materializing Eighteenth-Century Perfumes
3. Anna CHEN and Marguerite HAPPE, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA, ‘Bad Taste’: A Pedagogy of Public-Facing Recipe Revival
Note: Room capacity is limited, so interested attendees may wish to arrive early. Attendees will be invited to sample scents and beverages but will not be involuntarily exposed to potential irritants/allergens.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

S A T U R D A Y ,  2 1  M A R C H  2 0 2 0

Art Professions
Saturday, 8:00–9:30am
Chair: Carole PAUL, University of California, Santa Barbara
1. Heidi A. STROBEL, University of Evansville, Terminology and its Limitations
2. Anne NELLIS RICHTER, Independent Scholar, ‘Yr Obedient, Grateful, and Dutiful Servant’: Hierarchies of Work in a Private Art Gallery
3. Rachel HARMEYER, Rice University, Emulating Angelica: Decorative and Amateur Art after Kauffman
4. Kristin O’ROURKE, Dartmouth College, From Connoisseur to Professional: The Metamorphosis of Art Criticism

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Collecting, Antiquities, and Eighteenth-Century Art
Saturday, 9:45–11:15am
Chairs: Katherine A. P. ISELIN, University of Missouri-Columbia and Lauren DISALVO, Dixie State University
1. Nick STAGLIANO, Cooper Hewitt/Parsons School of Design, The New School, Expressions of Antiquity in Eighteenth-Century European Porcelain
2. Freya GOWRLEY, University of Derby, Classical Specimens and Fragmentary Histories: The Specimen Table as Part and Whole
3. Callum REID, University of Melbourne, Antiquities in Peter Leopold’s Uffizi Gallery
4. Josh HAINY, Truman State University, For Their Mutual Benefit: John Flaxman’s Recreation of the Belvedere Torso for Thomas Hope

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Herbarium: Illustration, Classification, Exchange
Saturday, 9:45–11:15am
Chair: Sarah BENHARRECH, University of Maryland
1. Maura FLANNERY, St. John’s University, New York, Erasures and Additions: The Herbarium as a Changing Document
2. J. Cabelle AHN, Harvard University, ‘Le cadavre desséché de plantes’: Herbaria and the Formation of the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris
3. Nicole LABOUFF, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Fair-Sexing the Herbarium: Making Women Horticulturalists Visible in Late Eighteenth-Century Britain
4. Katie SAGAL, Cornell College, Naming is Not Knowing: Charlotte Smith’s ‘Flora’ and Vegetal Proliferation

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The 37th James L. Clifford Memorial Lecture
Saturday, 11:30–12:30
Anne LAFONT, École des hautes études en sciences sociales de Paris (EHESS), Winckelmann Congo: Blackness in the Age of White Marble
Presiding: Melissa HYDE, University of Florida
This lecture will address the rise of African Art History— in the broadest sense— during the long eighteenth-century. During this period, notions of African art and its history were entangled with the idea of diasporic Africa or Blackness, as conceptualized by a diverse ensemble of European textual sources, most of them not concerned with art. The line of argument to be pursued here is that many of these early modern texts, ought, nonetheless, to be understood as a historical discourse on art— whether they describe African geography, natural history or commerce; narrate African history or catalogue its objects in Cabinets de Curiosités. Of course, these narratives, which are more or less connected with African material culture and ritual performances, eventually would be articulated in art theoretical publications properly speaking, as eighteenth-century authors such as abbé du Bos or Winckelmann began to include Africa in their ambition to write a comprehensive, comparative art history grounded on a climatic explanation of style. This approach to art history understood artistic style, form and content as products of the natural climate and atmosphere in which art was created. Recent scholarship has demonstrated the centrality of Whiteness to archeology’s emergence in the mid-eighteenth century. Adding to our understanding of the racial implications of whiteness and color in art history, this lecture will show, how, at the very same historical moment, Blackness was being constructed, both as a counterpart to Whiteness but also, more generally as a means of inscribing African rites and objects into the domain of European Fine Arts.

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Roundtable: Global Enlightenment, Digital Humanities, and Collaborative Scholarship: Reflections on The Eighteenth Centuries: Global Networks of Enlightenment (2018), Edited by David Gies and Cynthia Wall
Saturday, 2:00–3:30
Chair: Elizabeth Franklin LEWIS, University of Mary Washington
1. Jeanne BRITTON, University of South Carolina, Using Global Networks of Enlightenment: Giovanni Piranesi and the Digital Eighteenth Centuries
2. Valentina TIKOFF, DePaul University, Using Global Networks of Enlightenment: How Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Multiple Geographies, and Linguistic Perspectives Help Us Navigate and Teach the Age of Enlightenment
3. Carol GUARNIERI, University of Virginia, Creating a Digital Companion to Global Networks of Enlightenment: The Digital Eighteenth Centuries on mapscholar.org
4. Cynthia WALL, University of Virginia, Editing Global Networks of Enlightenment
5. David GIES, University of Virginia, Editing Global Networks of Enlightenment

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

Bio-Ethics
Saturday, 3:45–5:15
Chair: Rachel CARNELL, Cleveland State University
1. Alex SOLOMON, Ashoka University, Springs, Effluvia, and Action at a Distance
2. Andrew GRACIANO, University of South Carolina, Bioethics (and the Lack Thereof) in Art and Anatomy
3. Erin DREW, University of Mississippi, Usufruct: Towards an Eighteenth-Century Bio-Ethic

◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊

The Triumph of Love
A comedy of intrigue, gender confusion, and love by Pierre Marivaux, translated by James Magruder
Friday and Saturday, 20 and 21 March at 8pm; Sunday, 22 March at 2pm.
.Zack Theatre, 3224 Locust Street, St. Louis
Tickets available at the door; $20
A co-production of Washington University in St. Louis and ASECS