Enfilade

Print Quarterly, December 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 12, 2020

Meissen bowl with leopard licking its paw, after engraving with six leopards (see below), part of Hanbury Williams service, ca. 1745, porcelain, diameter 340 mm.

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Malcolm Jones, “Early Modern English Prints in the Joseph Ames Album at the Morgan Library,” pp. 411–31.

This article publishes, for the first time, some of the contents of an album in the Morgan Library and Museum, New York, entitled Emblematical and Satirical Prints in Persons and Professions. Compiled around 1750 by Joseph Ames (1689–1759) and containing 237 miscellaneous European prints. About 125 are catalogued as English; 33 of these are unique or exceedingly rare examples and are discussed in detail throughout the article. The remaining English prints in the album are described in an appendix.

N O T E S  A N D  R EV I E W S

Anonymous artist, Six Leopards, from album with prints of animals published by Joos de Bosscher, 1581–1600, engraving, 125 x 177 mm (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum).

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, Review of Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre grafischen Vorlagen (2018), pp. 465–69.

This note reviews a two-volume publication about print sources for imagery on eighteenth-century Meissen porcelain. Where possible, the catalogue of 475 entries presents the names of the artists, engravers or publishers of Dutch, French, German, and Italian print sources used.

Tom Young, Review of Douglas Fordham, Aquatint Worlds: Travel, Print, and Empire, 1770–1820 (2019), pp. 470–74.

This note, and the book it reviews, emphasises the close ties the medium of aquatint has with British exploration and imperialism. Using J.R. Abbey’s (1894–1969) collection of aquatint travel books, today held by the Yale Center for British Art, the case studies show how aquatint’s advantages in colour and detail helped to convey antiquarian details with meticulous accuracy, but that it also had a broader impact on developing a community of taste dependent on travel and the recognition of difference.

Call for Papers | BU Graduate Symposium, Crowd Control

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on December 12, 2020

From Boston University:

Crowd Control
The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture
(Online) 23–24 April 2021

Proposals due by 15 December 2020

Crowd control—as both an idea and an act—raises questions about agency, authority, and influence. From ancient Rome to Boston City Hall, state-sponsored architecture has policed the body and shaped the ideal of a citizen.Yet subtler forces such as painting, prints, and photographs also exert powerful influence. The events of this past year have heightened our awareness of both the power of the people and the contours of the systems which surround them. We have seen the wide array of structures that seek to order, pacify, neutralize, inspire, repress, or control the collective. The 37th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture invites submissions examining images, objects, and structures that engage with the regulation and redirection of peoples and their social behaviors.

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: architecture, urbanism, and the organization of private and public spaces; monuments, memory, and civic structures; masquerade, carnival, and festivals; ceremonies and processions; exhibitions and viewing conditions; pilgrimage and religious institutions; protest, policing, the carceral system, and surveillance; population control, eugenics, urban growth and decline; collective and mass culture; conquest, colonialism, coloniality, xenophobia; caste, race, and social hierarchies.

We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of study, from any area of study. Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer), a paper title, and a CV to bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2020. Selected speakers will be notified by early February. Papers should be 15 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session. The symposium will be held virtually on Friday, 23 April, and Saturday, 24 April 2021, with a keynote lecture by Dr. Paul Farber, Director of Monument Lab and Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Public Art & Space at the University of Pennsylvania Weitzman School of Design.

This event is generously sponsored by the Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; and the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association.