Enfilade

Print Quarterly, December 2020

Posted in books, journal articles, reviews by Editor on December 12, 2020

Meissen bowl with leopard licking its paw, after engraving with six leopards (see below), part of Hanbury Williams service, ca. 1745, porcelain, diameter 340 mm.

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The eighteenth century in the latest issue of Print Quarterly:

Print Quarterly 38.4 (December 2020)

A R T I C L E S

Malcolm Jones, “Early Modern English Prints in the Joseph Ames Album at the Morgan Library,” pp. 411–31.

This article publishes, for the first time, some of the contents of an album in the Morgan Library and Museum, New York, entitled Emblematical and Satirical Prints in Persons and Professions. Compiled around 1750 by Joseph Ames (1689–1759) and containing 237 miscellaneous European prints. About 125 are catalogued as English; 33 of these are unique or exceedingly rare examples and are discussed in detail throughout the article. The remaining English prints in the album are described in an appendix.

N O T E S  A N D  R EV I E W S

Anonymous artist, Six Leopards, from album with prints of animals published by Joos de Bosscher, 1581–1600, engraving, 125 x 177 mm (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum).

Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, Review of Raffinesse im Akkord: Meissener Porzellanmalerei und ihre grafischen Vorlagen (2018), pp. 465–69.

This note reviews a two-volume publication about print sources for imagery on eighteenth-century Meissen porcelain. Where possible, the catalogue of 475 entries presents the names of the artists, engravers or publishers of Dutch, French, German, and Italian print sources used.

Tom Young, Review of Douglas Fordham, Aquatint Worlds: Travel, Print, and Empire, 1770–1820 (2019), pp. 470–74.

This note, and the book it reviews, emphasises the close ties the medium of aquatint has with British exploration and imperialism. Using J.R. Abbey’s (1894–1969) collection of aquatint travel books, today held by the Yale Center for British Art, the case studies show how aquatint’s advantages in colour and detail helped to convey antiquarian details with meticulous accuracy, but that it also had a broader impact on developing a community of taste dependent on travel and the recognition of difference.

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