Enfilade

The Burlington Magazine, June 2021

Posted in books, catalogues, journal articles, reviews by Editor on June 28, 2021

Charles-Louis Clérisseau, Traou en Dalmathia, 1757
(Paris: Bibliothèque nationale de France)

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The eighteenth century in this month’s issue of The Burlington . . .

The Burlington Magazine 163 (June 2021) — Works of Art on Paper

A R T I C L E S

• Ana Šverko, “Clérisseau’s Journey to Dalmatia: A Newly Attributed Collection of Drawings,” pp. 492–502.
A collection of 136 hitherto anonymous drawings of Italy, Istria and Dalmatia in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, is here attributed to Charles-Louis Clérisseau. The drawings, which include a group made during his journey from Venice to Diocletian’s Palace in Split with Robert Adam in 1757, further expand our understanding of Clérisseau as the forerunner of a new generation of traveller-painters.

• Tony Barnard, “Trading in Art: Antonio Cesare di Poggi (1744–1836),” pp. 492–502.
With the help of his English wife, Hester, the Italian artist A.C. Poggi forged a career in London as a portrait painter, a retailer of fans, a dealer principally in drawings and publisher of prints. Poggi’s successes and failures reflect changing fashions and fortunes in the capital’s competitive art world between his arrival in England c.1770 and departure for the Continent in 1801.

• Christopher White, “Reminiscences of the British Museum Print Room, 1954–65,” pp. 492–502.
The author’s first job, as Assistant Keeper with responsibility for the Northern schools in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, London, introduced him to a distinguished group of curators and an occasionally eccentric band of visitors. The department’s focus was emphatically on drawings, where major acquisitions could be made by sharp-eyed scholars in the salesrooms.

Fan portraying George III and his family at the Royal Academy of Arts exhibition in 1788, made by A.C. Poggi incorporating a print by Pietro Antonio Martini after J. H. Ramberg, ca. 1790, engraved and hand-coloured paper with carved and pierced ivory sticks and guards, width when open 38.4 cm (London: Victoria and Albert Museum, T.56-1933).

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R E V I E W S

• Elizabeth Pergam, “The Frick Reframed,” pp. 536–39. On the plain, grey walls of the Modernist Breuer building, New York, some of the most famous works from the Frick Collection shine in a new light.

• Yuriko Jackall, Review of the exhibition catalogue Une des Provinces du Rococo: La Chine Rêvée de François Boucher, ed. by Yohan Rimaud and Alastair Laing (In Fine éditions d’art and Musée des beaux-arts et d’archéologie de Besançon, 2019), pp. 539–41.

• Jonathan Yarker, Review of the exhibition Turner’s Modern World (Tate Britain, 2020–21), pp. 541–44.

• Amanda Dotseth, Review of the exhibition publication Museo del Prado 1819–2019: Un lugar de memoria, ed. by Javier Portús et al (Prado, 2018), pp. 546–49.

• Simonetta Prosperi Valenti Rodinò, Review of Les dessins de la collection Mariette: Écoles italienne et espagnole, by Pierre Rosenberg et al, 4 vols., (Somogy, 2019), pp. 550–51.

• Oliver Tostmann, Review of Die Zeichnungen des Giovan Battista Beinaschi aus der Sammlung der Kunstakademie Düsseldorf am Kunstpalast, ed. by Sonja Brink and Francesco Grisolia (Imhof Verlag, 2020), pp. 556–57. [Beinaschi lived between 1636 and 1688, but Tostmann notes in passing points of his eighteenth-century reception.]

• Christoph Martin Vogtherr, Review of L’ Art et la manière: Dessins français du XVIIIesiècle des musées de Marseille, ed. by Luc Georget and Gérard Fabre (Silvana Editoriale, 2019), pp. 557–58.

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