Enfilade

Call for Collaborators | The Digital Piranesi

Posted in online learning, opportunities, resources by Editor on January 8, 2023

View of the Flavian Amphitheatre, called the Colosseum (Veduta dell’Anfiteatro Flavio detto il Colosseo), from Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s Opere, volume 1 of 29 (Paris: Firmin Didot, 1837–39). Piranesi’s original copper plates were used for this posthumously published collection; this specific print comes from a complete set of volumes at the University of South Carolina, home to The Digital Piranesi project.

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From the Call for Participants:

Essay Contributors for The Digital Piranesi
Applications due by 1 March 2023

Digital art history, word-image studies, architectural history, and book history meet in The Digital Piranesi, a developing digital humanities project devoted to the complete works of Giambattista Piranesi (1720–1778). With funding from the Kress Foundation, six collaborators will be invited to contribute to the project. Following an introductory in-person workshop in Columbia, South Carolina, in late Summer 2023, regular virtual meetings through Summer 2024 will be dedicated to writing brief, impactful scholarly essays about each image in the first volume of his Roman Antiquities / Le Anthichità Romane (1756). Travel and accommodation will be supported by grant funds.

Each image of the first volume of the Roman Antiquities appears with original annotations and (in metadata) English translations here.

Please send a CV and one-page statement detailing qualifications, experience, and interest to Jeanne Britton at jbritton@mailbox.sc.edu by 1 March 2023. Inquiries are welcome.

The Digital Piranesi has received generous support from the NEH Division of Preservation and Access, the Kress Foundation, and, at the University of South Carolina, the Office of the Vice President for Research, the Center for Digital Humanities, the Magellan Scholar Program, the Maners-Pappas Endowment, the Humanities Collaborative, and the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

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