Enfilade

Humanities Commons

Posted in resources by Editor on May 29, 2017

For many of us, summer means catching up on one’s scholarly profiles: filing activity reports, updating CVs, reformatting personal websites, and uploading academic papers. Now you have a new set of options with a new platform: Humanities Commons, a nonprofit, open-access network, built with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

As described on the ‘About’ page for HC:

Humanities Commons was designed by scholarly societies in the humanities to serve the needs of humanists as they engage in teaching and research that benefit the larger community. Unlike other social and academic communities, Humanities Commons is open-access, open-source, and nonprofit. It is focused on providing a space to discuss, share, and store cutting-edge research and innovative pedagogy—not on generating profits from users’ intellectual and personal data.

The network also features an open-access repository, the Commons Open Repository Exchange. CORE allows users to preserve their research and increase its reach by sharing it across disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries. Developed in partnership with Columbia University’s Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, CORE is underwritten by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Office of Digital Humanities.

In December, Inside Higher Ed noted the launch of the beta version.

In a March posting for ACRLog, the blog of the Association of College & Research Libraries, Lily Troia interviewed Nicky Agate, Head of Digital Initiatives in the Office of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association. The posting provides a useful introduction to Humanities Commons and how it differs from commercial services such as Academia.edu.

CAA is one of four societies currently participating, and the hub, CAA Commons, is scheduled for release in the coming weeks (months?). In the meantime (and at least at this point, it’s not obvious what additional features might be available with CAA Commons), anyone is invited to register, establish a profile, create a website (in cooperation with WordPress), upload papers, and start setting up groups. Groups can be public, private, or hidden. More information is available from the Guides and FAQ sections.

Craig Hanson

 

 

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