Enfilade

Call for Papers | The Art of Ugliness, Graduate Symposium

Posted in Calls for Papers, graduate students by Editor on November 28, 2018

From H-ArtHist:

The Art of Ugliness, 29th Annual Art History Association Graduate Symposium
Indiana University, Bloomington, 13 April 2019

Proposals due by 10 January 2019

Keynote address: “The Use Value of Ugliness” by Dr. Andrei Pop (Associate Professor, Committee on Social Thought, Art History, and the College, The University of Chicago) and Dr. Mechtild Widrich (Assistant Professor, Art History, Theory and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Is ugliness diametrically opposed to beauty? Or is ugliness simply another aspect of the same coin systematically constructed and cultivated over centuries? While beauty has been fruitfully examined in fields ranging from philosophy to aesthetics and art history, less attention has been given to discourses concerning ugliness. We consider it imperative to reconsider ugliness at this moment to flesh out the ways in which discourses surrounding the ‘ugly’ shape ideas surrounding acceptability. Why do we define, name, or think of something or someone as ‘ugly’? Is it a psychological reaction to what we perceive as gross or disgusting? Does it violate morality? The Art of Ugliness will explore the complex social, cultural, and political aspects embedded within notions of ugliness as well as the aesthetic and philosophical implications of ‘the ugly’.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Changing perceptions of the nude
• The geography of decay- the ruinous landscape
• Disease and the body
• Xenophobia
• Class and the representation of the profane and abject
• Ugliness and (pseudo)scientific visual culture: phrenology, physiognomy
• Technology and the body
• Evolutionary Theories and Aesthetics
• Relationships to the ‘exotic’/ ‘other’
• The Grotesque; the monstrous; the strange

We invite papers that address ideas of ugliness and aesthetics and greatly encourage the submission of papers engaging objects from a broad variety of periods, geographies, and social groups. Paper sessions, followed by a panel response and discussion, will occur on Saturday, April 13th followed by the keynote address. Current graduate students in art history and related disciplines are invited to submit an abstract (maximum 300 words) for a twenty-minute presentation and CV to ahasympo@gmail.com by January 10th, 2019. Honoraria will be awarded to all presenters who attend from outside Bloomington.

Call for Papers | Early Modern Privacy: Notions, Spaces, Implications

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on November 28, 2018

From the Call for Papers:

Early Modern Privacy: Notions, Spaces, Implications
Royal Danish Academy of Science and Letters, Copenhagen, 9–10 April 2019

Proposals due by 2 December 2018

Pieter Bruegel the Younger, Visit to the Farmhouse, c.1620–30, oil on panel, 37 × 49 cm (Bath: The Holburne Museum).

The Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Privacy Studies (PRIVACY) at the University of Copenhagen invites applications for its inaugural conference. Our goal is to provide an opportunity to discuss and re-examine source material in order to understand practices, spaces, and ideas of privacy and related concepts that emerged in the early modern period across historical disciplines. We welcome (interdisciplinary) considerations of practice and performances of privacy and its opposites, as well as analyses of terminology, vocabulary, and languages, for example, in sources mentioning words using the prefix priv-.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers
• Willem Frijhoff (Erasmus University of Rotterdam)
• Hélène Merlin-Kajman (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3)
• Mia Korpiola (University of Turku)
• Maarten Delbeke (ETH Zurich)

We invite colleagues working within any field of Early Modern studies to submit proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes duration. Please upload paper title, an abstract of no more than 300 words, and a concise CV via PRIVACYs website no later than Sunday, 2 December 2018. Abstracts and CVs should be in English. A limited number of travel bursaries are available on a need basis; submit your travel bursary application with an estimated budget alongside your materials at the link above. For further information, please email privacy@teol.ku.dk. A final program from the conference will be published in early January.

Suggested Topics
• Legal and religious definitions of private and public
• Individuality and subjectivity in relation to private and public spaces
• The emergence of the modern home and life-cycle inside and outside a (house-)hold
• Vagrancy, poverty and homelessness
• Education and access to knowledge
• Confidentiality, gossip, secrecy and surveillance within communities
• Sexual normativity and deviance from sexual norms
• Confessional spaces
• Interior and exterior design and life
• Public and private politics

Organizing Committee
Michaël Green, Natália da Silva Perez, Anna Katharina Becker, Fredrik Torisson

Call for Papers | Antiquarian ‘Science’ in the Scholarly Society

Posted in Calls for Papers by Editor on November 28, 2018

From the Call for Papers:

Antiquarian ‘Science’ in the Scholarly Society
Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, 1–2 April 2019

Proposals due by 30 November 2018

This is workshop two of the AHRC International Networking Grant: Collective Wisdom: Collecting in the Early Modern Academy led by Anna Marie Roos (Lincoln) and Vera Keller (Oregon).

We will explore how ‘antiquarian science’ informed collecting in the early modern scholarly academy, as many members of these societies like astronomer Martin Folkes (1690–1754) also were connoisseurs and antiquaries. Folkes was Newton’s protégé, President of both the Royal Society and Society of Antiquaries of London, and he even tried to unite the two societies as they had many common members and goals.

In this workshop we will ask (inter alia):
What was the relationship between archaeological fieldwork or antiquarianism and learned travel or the Grand Tour? What does collecting on tour say about the manner and scale of personal and institutional contacts between London and the scientific world of the Continent? What tools of natural philosophy were utilised to understand buildings and artefacts? What were the implications of the collecting of ethnographic objects for political dominance and Empire?

A working session using sources from the Society of Antiquaries Library and Museum will also be part of the programme. The Society’s library is Britain’s oldest major research library for archaeology, architectural history, decorative arts (especially medieval), material culture and the historic environment. It contains books, archives, manuscripts, prints and drawings. Its accredited museum collection—which was formed before the introduction of public museums and galleries in the mid-18th century—contains prehistoric, classical and medieval antiquities, seal matrices and impressions, and paintings.

Speakers include Philip Beeley (Oxford), Dominik Collet (Heidelberg), Dustin Frazier-Wood (Roehampton), Stephanie Moser (Southhampton), Cesare Pastorino (Berlin), Anna Marie Roos (Lincoln), Edwin Rose (Cambridge), Kim Sloan (British Museum), Alexander Wragge-Morley (UCL), Elizabeth Yale (Iowa)

We welcome papers of 25 minutes duration from established and early career scholars on the themes above. Please send an abstract of 200 words to Anna Marie Roos (aroos@lincoln.ac.uk) by 30 November 2018.